Question about Ortho residencies?

Discussion in 'Orthopaedic Surgery' started by dz88, Dec 17, 2005.

  1. dz88

    dz88 Member
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    Hi guys, could anyone tell me what the top 5 ortho residencies are?
     
  2. HtSht2BoneDoc

    HtSht2BoneDoc Member
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    well if you want the us news and world report google it. HSS is number 1. BU this just says best orthopedics. I dont think they count teaching but HSS is supposed to be pretty dam good as well as the other top five they list.
     
  3. moquito_17

    moquito_17 Member
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    I think that if you talk to most guys who are in ortho, you are going to get a similar response as to what I am about to say: Trying to rank the top 5 residencies is like trying to rank the top 5 beers in the U.S.

    Seriously, every program is going to be different in different ways. Some are more academic, some have more joints, some have more trauma, some more conferences and some more operating time. Some have a good balance, others are more lopsided. All graduates are competent, capable and employable. Most residencies will prepare you for a fellowship. What you want in a porgram will affect what YOU think are the top 5.

    For me, I would never go to HSS because I don't like NYC. Others drool over it. If you're going to do ortho, you have to find the program (in the right area) that is right for you.

    Hope this helps,
     
  4. dz88

    dz88 Member
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    when you say the right area, do you mean the area that you want to practice in? Can't a resident go to the east for his residency and then go to the west to practice? I hope someone can clear this up for me.
     
  5. O'doyleRules

    O'doyleRules Old Soul
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    Hmm, how about HSS, Harvard, HJD, Iowa and UWash? Thats really a tough one to pick, because Pitt, Penn, JHU, Duke, UTSW, UCSF, UCLA are all good too. Basically anywhere that is a major academic medical center.
     
  6. moquito_17

    moquito_17 Member
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    Of course. But you are more likley to get job offers and know people in the area that you do your residency. If you want to go to HSS then San Diego, no problem. As the theme goes, no rules are set in stone--there are just general trends.

    Also, five to seven years of your life is a long time and where you live is important to some people...
     
  7. ForensicsBound

    ForensicsBound Junior Member
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    As far as the location of your residency program influencing the location where you ultimately practice, it makes no difference. You can do your residency in Miami and practice in Nebraska. The location of your fellowship has a closer correlation with your ultimate practice location but even this is irrelevant. Basically, once you've finished your training, you can go anywhere in the country.
     
  8. dz88

    dz88 Member
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  9. sscooterguy

    sscooterguy Senior Member
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    I agree with moquito_17, its almost impossible to say whats the "best". If you are talking about what is the most competative to get into, thats another thing. The reason why some are more competative than others is multifactoral. Part of it is name recognition, reputation (which is multifactoral in itself), location (especially big cities), NIH grants, etc. Unfortunately all ortho programs are competative. I guess the easiest, not the best, way to see how competative programs are is to see what cut offs the programs have to interview. I've heard many quotes of academic programs having USMLE cut offs at 230-235, and thats just for interviews.
    As for a list, I unfortunately cannot give one. Good luck though.

    sscooterguy
     
  10. bonedoctor

    bonedoctor Junior Member

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    The above post are excellant. For every applicant, you will find a different top five programs.

    Me, I had a wife and kids, so we drew a 500 mile radius around our current location and I interviewed within that area so as to stay close to family support. I then decided on less academic programs which would put the majority of the US News top programs low on my list. My top five programs would include smaller programs such as Greenville, SC and Jackson, MS.

    The short of the story is the top five programs are the top five you match to your interest: location, academic, etc.

    Helpful hints:
    1. If you know you want to go into academics, you need to look at academic, research orientated programs.
    2. If you think you might want to go into general ortho, you need to find a well rounded program (which believe it or not is hard to find).
    3. If you think you would like to sub-specialize, finding a program that is strong in the area of your interest would be beneficial.
    - I'm going into spine but my program is weak in spine. However, I didn't have a CLUE that I was going into spine while hunting for programs or I might be in another program
    4. Look at the fellow-ships that the residents from that program are getting. If you see a programs former residents with fellowships from HSS or Harvard, that program must be doing something right.
    5. While interviewing, look to see if the residents are happy because that will be you in a few years.
    6. Always ask about possible faculty changes. Some programs can fall apart if they loss two or three faculty.
    7. Do as many externships as possible. The chances are, you will end up where you rotate.
    8. Something that applies currently is to MAKE sure the program is complying with ACGME hour regulations. This is new and MANY programs are covering up there overages on hours. This will point to serious consequences in the future, i.e. loss of accredidation.
    9. Interview at least 10 places ( if you get that many interviews). This is one time in your life to not to skip out. If anything, the interviewee parties are usually worthwhile.
    10. If you have a spouse/significant other, involve them HEAVILY. An unhappy spouse during a five year residency spells disaster.
    11. Ask questions, ask questions. You will not know if you don't ask. Most programs will not advertise weaknesses but usually will not cover them up if enquired about.

    Of course, the above is if you are blessed enough to be chosing programs. Many times, it can turn into "I hope someone, ANYONE will take me." :)

    Good luck!
     

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