emedpa

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so what's the deal with dogs and raisins? my boxer ate a bag of raisins and had to spend 48 hrs in ther doggie icu with constant iv fluids and forced diuresis as a precation to avoid renal failure....
raisins.....?
 

birdvet2006

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emedpa said:
so what's the deal with dogs and raisins? my boxer ate a bag of raisins and had to spend 48 hrs in ther doggie icu with constant iv fluids and forced diuresis as a precation to avoid renal failure....
raisins.....?
The toxic principle of grapes and raisins is not known at this point, but research is being done to find out. Not all grapes and raisins are toxic, as many dogs have eaten them and are OK. However, many dogs have shown symptoms ranging from vomiting to renal failure after being given grapes/raisins. Sorry there's no good answer to your question.


Cindy
Vet student at Glasgow (Scotland)
 

VeganSoprano

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Wow, I'm so sorry to hear about your dog's misfortune. How big was the box of raisins he ate? And did he ever actually develop problems or were they just taking precautions?
 
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emedpa

emedpa

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VeganSoprano said:
Wow, I'm so sorry to hear about your dog's misfortune. How big was the box of raisins he ate? And did he ever actually develop problems or were they just taking precautions?
1/2 lb bag. didn't develop any sx, just in hospital as a precaution on advice of our vet.
 
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emedpa

emedpa

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my wife called actually...just as a cya and I'm glad she did.
they gave her (the dog, not the wife:) ) ipecac and charcoal then iv fluids and forced diuresis for 48 hrs. home now doing fine. never bumped her renal function tests.
 

reddirtgirl

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I just saw this elsewhere... some things on the list are obvious, other's, I only heard rumors about (like onions/garlic).

Why isn't this list more widely known? If you are reading this and are a DVM/vet tech, did they deal w/ this in your training at all?

I think Laney (my lab mutt) has sampled over half this list... then again, she also eats citrus, incl grapefruit (which might need to be on that list - that whole cytochrome P-450 thing)

http://www.petalia.com.au/Templates/StoryTemplate_Process.cfm?specie=Dogs&story_no=257#ct-4

might vary, dog to dog....



Chocolate toxicity
Onion and garlic poisoning
The danger of macadamia nuts
Other potential dangers
Related Products


Chocolate toxicity Top
Chocolate contains theobromine, a compound that is a cardiac stimulant and a diuretic.

When affected by an overdose of chocolate, a dog can become excited and hyperactive. Due to the diuretic effect, it may pass large volumes of urine and it will be unusually thirsty. Vomiting and diarrhoea are also common. The effect of theobromine on the heart is the most dangerous effect. Theobromine will either increase the dog’s heart rate or may cause the heart to beat irregularly. Death is quite possible, especially with exercise.

After their pet has eaten a large quantity of chocolate, many pet owners assume their pet is unaffected. However, the signs of sickness may not be seen for several hours, with death following within twenty-four hours.

Cocoa powder and cooking chocolate are the most toxic forms. A 10-kilogram dog can be seriously affected if it eats a quarter of a 250gm packet of cocoa powder or half of a 250gm block of cooking chocolate. These forms of chocolate contain ten times more theobromine than milk chocolate. Thus, a chocolate mud cake could be a real health risk for a small dog. Even licking a substantial part of the chocolate icing from a cake can make a dog unwell.

Semi-sweet chocolate and dark chocolate are the next most dangerous forms, with milk chocolate being the least dangerous. A dog needs to eat more than a 250gm block of milk chocolate to be affected. Obviously, the smaller the dog, the less it needs to eat.


Onion and garlic poisoning Top
Onions and garlic are other dangerous food ingredients that cause sickness in dogs, cats and also livestock. Onions and garlic contain the toxic ingredient thiosulphate. Onions are more of a danger.

Pets affected by onion toxicity will develop haemolytic anaemia, where the pet’s red blood cells burst while circulating in its body.

At first, pets affected by onion poisoning show gastroenteritis with vomiting and diarrhoea. They will show no interest in food and will be dull and weak. The red pigment from the burst blood cells appears in an affected animal’s urine and it becomes breathless. The breathlessness occurs because the red blood cells that carry oxygen through the body are reduced in number.

The poisoning occurs a few days after the pet has eaten the onion. All forms of onion can be a problem including dehydrated onions, raw onions, cooked onions and table scraps containing cooked onions and/or garlic. Left over pizza, Chinese dishes and commercial baby food containing onion, sometimes fed as a supplement to young pets, can cause illness.

Onion poisoning can occur with a single ingestion of large quantities or with repeated meals containing small amounts of onion. A single meal of 600 to 800 grams of raw onion can be dangerous whereas a ten-kilogram dog, fed 150 grams of onion for several days, is also likely to develop anaemia. The condition improves once the dog is prevented from eating any further onion

While garlic also contains the toxic ingredient thiosulphate, it seems that garlic is less toxic and large amounts would need to be eaten to cause illness.


The danger of macadamia nuts Top
Macadamia nuts are another concern. A recent paper written by Dr. Ross McKenzie, a Veterinary Pathologist with the Department of Primary Industries, points to the danger of raw and roasted macadamia nuts for pets.

The toxic compound is unknown but the affect of macadamia nuts is to cause locomotory difficulties. Dogs develop a tremor of the skeletal muscles, and weakness or paralysis of the hindquarters. Affected dogs are often unable to rise and are distressed, usually panting. Some affected dogs have swollen limbs and show pain when the limbs are manipulated.

Dogs have been affected by eating as few as six macadamia kernels (nuts without the shell) while others had eaten approximately forty kernels. Some dogs had also been given macadamia butter.

Luckily, the muscle weakness, while painful, seems to be of short duration and all dogs recovered from the toxicity. All dogs were taken to their veterinary surgeon.

Pets owners should not assume that human food is always safe for pets. When it comes to chocolate, onions, garlic and macadamia nuts, such foods should be given in only small quantities, or not at all. Be sure that your pets can’t get into your stash of chocolates, that food scraps are disposed of carefully to prevent onion and garlic toxicity and that your dog is prevented from picking up macadamia nuts if you have a tree in your garden.



Other potential dangers

Pear pips, the kernels of plums, peaches and apricots, apple core pips (contain cyanogenic glycosides resulting in cyanide posioning)
Potato peelings and green looking potatoes
Rhubarb leaves
Mouldy/spoiled foods
Alcohol
Yeast dough
Coffee grounds, beans & tea (caffeine)
Hops (used in home brewing)
Tomato leaves & stems (green parts)
Broccoli (in large amounts)
Raisins and grapes
Cigarettes, tobacco, cigars
what does "pips" translate into in australian (where the site is from)... pits(?) I assume??
 

mammalmama

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Hi there:
I'm not a DVM yet, but the vet that I do work for has seen many poisonings due to these foods. We don't see many onion poisonings but chocolate is a regular. We have an office handbook that tells you what foods are poisoness. Another danger to be aware of is moldy walnuts. I've seen plenty of cases come in with this poison. It affects the nervous system of the pet so they act wobbly and drunk, they pant a lot, and act like they were poisoned with snail bait. The vet that I work for went to U.C. Davis and they dealt with all kinds of situations like this. I think most schools do. Hope this helps.
 

MicheleVet

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At UF we have a Toxicology class and a Posionous Plants class. Together they cover just about all "ODs."

One of the best resources is the Animal Poison Control Center. website: http://www.aspca.org/site/PageServer?pagename=apcc

Veterinarians and owners alike can call their hotline in cases of known or suspected overdoses.

I think that in cases of an animal ingesting things other than pet food it's always best to contact a veterinarian for the best course of action.

Michele