L.M

Jun 8, 2015
3
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm applying through OMSAS, but opinions in general is great. I was just wondering if the med schools would look down on high school teachers as referees. I have a university prof as a referee already secured, but I feel high school teachers see students in a different capacity than profs and a previous reference letter they wrote for me a few years back was amazing. I was wondering if its okay to ask them too.
 

ConfusedChemist

2+ Year Member
Aug 5, 2014
804
398
Status
Medical Student
I mean sure, you can, but do you not have anyone from the last 4 years? I mean, it very well be a fabulous letter, describing what a great person you were and why....in high school. Is it really relevent now? Do they know you now, the person who is applying to med school? Not a high school student 4 years aho
 

NotASerialKiller

2+ Year Member
Jul 7, 2015
1,457
6,866
Status
Medical Student
It's true that the quality of the letter is much more important than the referee's qualifications, but if you're using them as an academic reference then they haven't been evaluating you in years, not since you were a teenager. Not nearly as useful as a prof's opinion because their basis for evaluation is much less relevant. Not a death sentence or anything, but avoid it if there is any prof who has seen you do well and has nice things to say about you.
 

CurveballfromCanada

2+ Year Member
Oct 27, 2016
26
6
Status
Pre-Medical
Anyone got any advice about how best to approach your profs for references? I have heard some horror stories about this process and I want to make sure I get my best referees and not mess up by doing the wrong thing!
I've gone to my profs and asked them straight-up; "Would you be willing to write me a letter of reference, and if not, what would I need to improve on so that you would?", with no beating around the bush. You need to have built up a professional relationship beforehand; good academic performance, participation in class activities, ask questions after lectures and during office hours (office hours are a big one, asking them questions during office hours shows you're committed and actually putting effort into their class, attend as many as possible), show your interest in their subject and willingness to learn. Be as honest and straightforward as possible with your professors, but more importantly with yourself. If they don't think you deserve a letter of recommendation then be open to criticism and ask them what you need to change.