BRCA1

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Getting ready to submit away applications and am updating my CV. Question for you all:

Should I include regional abstracts (i.e., those presented at institutional symposia, student forums, etc.)? I have 16 abstracts for national/international meetings, but have an additional 33 that have been presented at my home institution.

Thoughts?
 

RadOncDoc21

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Oct 24, 2010
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Getting ready to submit away applications and am updating my CV. Question for you all:

Should I include regional abstracts (i.e., those presented at institutional symposia, student forums, etc.)? I have 16 abstracts for national/international meetings, but have an additional 33 that have been presented at my home institution.

Thoughts?
In the words of Lil John...WHAT!!? 16/33 abstracts :confused:
 
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BRCA1

BRCA1

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Sorry, should have given some more info... Not all 16/33 are ones I presented. Our cancer center has an annual research symposium and I've averaged 3-5 abstracts (1-2 "first author") at each of these over the last 5-6 years. Most of the others are from our annual student research forum, of which, again, I'm not presenter on some.

Of the 16 national/international, I actually presented 8.

In the interest of not breaking ERAS, and not looking like a douche, I thought I'd at least pare my regional abstracts down to ones I actually presented.

Reasonable?
 

napoleondynamite

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Exercise caution. You may think more abstracts = more better, but depends on how many pubs you have. Some PD's will look at 33 abstracts and only 1-2 pubs and wonder why you keep taking on new projects without publishing your prior work.
 
Aug 17, 2010
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Exercise caution. You may think more abstracts = more better, but depends on how many pubs you have. Some PD's will look at 33 abstracts and only 1-2 pubs and wonder why you keep taking on new projects without publishing your prior work.
This is key. If you are just doing abstracts and not outputing papers, thats a huge issue. Your rad onc mentors won't like you as a resident then. Unless you've got a CV of a faculty member, itll be tough to justify 33 abstracts...
 

canadianoutlaw

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Apr 11, 2012
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be prepared to answer questions regarding the specifics of every one of those 33+16 abstracts on the interview trail. everything you list on that application is fair game for discussion. every item listed on my application came up at least once during interview season
 

Neuronix

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On my CV, I stopped listing non first-author posters at even major conferences a long time ago. It's easy to get listed on abstracts for minor contributions, but to me they don't really mean anything. Minor conferences often are lightly peer reviewed and have near 100% acceptance rates for abstracts. So again, they don't really mean much to me. But that's just my two cents.

My concerns is that you might over-dilute your significant contributions to the field by including all that filler. I think maybe you should stick to your first author, major conference presentations and publications. I guess it depends how many total research experiences that gives you. But I do agree with the above: you should know everything you list on your ERAS very well. You never know when you might get an interviewer whose research interests line up with an offshoot of a project you peripherally contributed to... So if you're listed on a lot of posters you don't remember clearly, that's another reason not to include them.
 

SJSM001

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Feb 5, 2013
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My understanding was that things that should be listed on a CV/ ERAS were published abstracts and presentations. If it was presented by someone else at an institutional (and I assume non-published) conference, then it doesn't fit in either of these categories, correct? I may be off base here, but that's the guideline I've been following for my CV.
 

thesauce

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My feeling is that you should include everything until you reach 15 or so. Then drop off the middle author/no-name conference abstracts, etc.