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Renal physiology

Discussion in 'Step I' started by DoubleOSevenn, Mar 3, 2007.

  1. DoubleOSevenn

    2+ Year Member

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    I really do NOT enjoy renal phys...at all. I'm trying to get through BRS physio and there are a million calculations in the renal section. Is this really relevant for the test? I can get the concepts but I hate memorizing formulas...any advice?
     
  2. DragonWell

    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    I used Vander's for our renal block and really liked it. I read the whole thing in a day and it covered all the info I needed for the test.

    Edit: Didn't really read your post carefully. The above was good for Phys. course, not sure how it is for Step 1.

    BRS Phys. was pretty weak in renal, IMO.
     
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  3. SeventhSon

    SeventhSon SIMMER DOWN
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    if you understand the concepts and know definitions, you shouldn't ever have to memorize a formula. It all comes down to mass balance, fractional delivery, and clearance.
     
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  4. U4iA

    U4iA εὐφορία
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    obviously, and i know you have done this in the past, the best way to learn a formula is to associate what it means with the formula itself. with some of the formulas that you are having a hard time understanding, force yourself to describe why it makes sense or transform the words and variables into a picture. by doing that, you're forcing yourself to understand the concept. this may sound stupid, but you can make a game out of understanding it. rote memorization is unnatural and will be more difficult to apply to problems or clinical situations in the long run.

    For example, in calculating clearance (which seems like a pervasive concept in renal phys), the formula is C=(UxV)/Px.. memorizing it wont do you all too much good if you don't really understand it.. the concept is very simple.

    The description you will find in the book may not make complete sense to you. In which case, reword what they are saying in your own words without losing the meaning. Clearance is defined as "The volume of plasma from which the substance is cleared completely per unit time." Relating it to C=(UxV)/Px and asking yourself why it is important to know this may help put it all together.

    like the previous poster was alluding to, association and understanding is so much better than memorization especially in a conceptual course like physio. in physiology, look at memorizing like telling lies. you want to do it as little as possible. because when you do it once, you'll have to do it again and again. but if you understand the concepts they merge together because of the inter-relatedness of the topics within the subject and ultimately don't feel as heavy in your mind - making it much less likely that you will forget, get confused, or be easily tricked.. not to mention, a solid understanding of physio concepts will make pathology and pharmacology more understandable.

    good luck.
     
  5. notsobright

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    Do both is my recommendation. Knowing the concept and knowing it well is key. Memory work is for speed. So work first on comprehension. If you have time, then memorize.. Third, learn how to ball-park. If a Cr is at a certain level, you can ball park the GFR assuming relatively normal values. remember, it's not linear. For speed, you can memorize a few major points on the GFR versus Cr curve.

    Best of luck. I am taking step 1 as well and getting good mentoring advice. Take my advice with a grain of salt because I have not gone through the step 1 experience yet. :thumbup:
     

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