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deleted600623

If I’m trying to go into cardiology for fellowship, how necessary is it to get at least a project under my belt prior to residency? I know its a competitive subspecialty so research production plays a big part in that but I don’t know what that really translates to practically. I’m currently a 2nd year working on one project (diff IM subspecialty related) that has led to a poster presentation and will likely lead to publication so I will have some research prior to residency. Thanks!
 

aSagacious

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Your CV is cumulative and includes all research activity since undergrad. Never too soon to start padding it. ;)

Also, most competitive internal medicine residencies value productive researchers (in addition to the other usual checkboxes).
 
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AnatomyGrey12

You’ll need research to get that nice IM residency that will lead to a cards fellowship.
 
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deleted600623

Your CV is cumulative and includes all research activity since undergrad. Never too soon to start padding it. ;)

Also, most competitive internal medicine residencies value productive researchers (in addition to the other usual checkboxes).
Good point. Does the type/quality of productivity matter? I may be wrong but I would assume that much of the production that medical students contribute to is not high quality unless they're focused on 1 big, meaningful project?
 

aSagacious

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Quality and quantity are not mutually exclusive. :) If you're serious about doing research you should do two thing simultaneously:
- Quality: Commit to a PI/lab for the long haul. Find a group that does genuinely interesting stuff. Also, you should seek to add tools to your research toolbox (stats, programming, medical illustration, expertise in a particular disease/procedure/technology, etc).
- Quantity: Simultaneously, say yes to everything. Let your PI and everyone you meet know that you're willing and able to help with anything. Book chapters, case reports, lit reviews, retrospective case series, etc.

In general, the hierarchy of research is:
- Basic/translational/RCT > retrospective clinical study > case report/series, systematic review / meta-analysis > book chapter.
- Prestigious journal > mid-tier journal > throw away journal
- First author > second author > middle author
- Journal article > oral presentation at national conference > poster at national conference > anything at intramural conference
 
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DameJulie

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Quantity: Simultaneously, say yes to everything. Let your PI and everyone you meet know that you're willing and able to help with anything.
I would be careful to not overload yourself with multiple projects. Just remember boards and passing classes are priorities.
 
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