Residency Culture for IMGs

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MDwife

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Dear All:
My husband is a PGY-2 in OBGYN. He completed his reidency in Europe and due to some life circumstances found himself in the USA. He passed all the USMLE exmas, got into a program and this is where the problems start..

People (mostly nurses) are complaining about him saying that he is abrasive, arrogant, etc.
He does come from a culture where the doctor is God himself. He is not a wussy kind of guy but he is not a beast either. Most of the residents are IMGs but he seems to be the center of all issues. Physically, he is tall and dark (you caaaan't miss him), very smart, always has best scores on ACOGs and all those things can be bothersome to some.

Let me say that this program is not a standard of excellence or reputation since the program director was just fired for having sex with an intern (maybe she watched too much Gray's anatomy).:laugh:

My question is, can you suggest a book or article on this topic? How to fit into the American medical culture. Smiling all the time even when people throw stones at you in not enough.

Thanks!
 

Terex

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Dear All:
My husband is a PGY-2 in OBGYN. He completed his reidency in Europe and due to some life circumstances found himself in the USA. He passed all the USMLE exmas, got into a program and this is where the problems start..

People (mostly nurses) are complaining about him saying that he is abrasive, arrogant, etc.
He does come from a culture where the doctor is God himself. He is not a wussy kind of guy but he is not a beast either. Most of the residents are IMGs but he seems to be the center of all issues. Physically, he is tall and dark (you caaaan't miss him), very smart, always has best scores on ACOGs and all those things can be bothersome to some.

Let me say that this program is not a standard of excellence or reputation since the program director was just fired for having sex with an intern (maybe she watched too much Gray's anatomy).:laugh:

My question is, can you suggest a book or article on this topic? How to fit into the American medical culture. Smiling all the time even when people throw stones at you in not enough.

Thanks!

People will not change for your husband..He needs to step 1 foot back....Treat health team members such as nurses etc as your allies not enemy..People here in US treat you as what you treat to them...Doctors here are not treated as Gods as it was before...Im not against your husband but he need to examine himself why he is the "center of everything"
 

buckley

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Dear All:
Smiling all the time even when people throw stones at you in not enough.


I do find that IN GENERAL, people are harsher, "ruder", at least they seem to be, here in the US, and definitely less respect than what is afforded medical doctors in europe. I think though it's just a cultural thing, the american system prides itself on being fast, efficient, tailormade and consumer-driven, so don't take it personally.

The culture here is also about keeping cool and yes, even forced smiling. But you need to make sure you're not a wimp either. I've learned to grow claws in this country. Painted claws.

But we are the foreigners, and hence the adjustment is upon us.
 

peppy

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I can definitely see how a cultural misunderstanding might be causing people to get the wrong idea about him even though he is not intending to be abrasive. Even though it is an old book, Dale Carnegie's book "How to Win Friends and Influence People" might be helpful in getting insight into ideas about how to make a positive impression on people from an American-centered view.
Another approach might be to look at some of the residents who seem to get along well with the staff and ask them for advice.
It might also help the nurses develop a more positive view of him if he made a point of asking them for their input more, and explaining why he chose to do things differently if he does something a nurse doesn't agree with. Little things like making a point of asking them how their day is going, saying "thanks" when asking a nurse to do something, occasionally bringing donuts in for the staff, and other such gestures would also probably improve their perception of his friendliness.
 

MJB

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I can definitely see how a cultural misunderstanding might be causing people to get the wrong idea about him even though he is not intending to be abrasive. Even though it is an old book, Dale Carnegie's book "How to Win Friends and Influence People" might be helpful in getting insight into ideas about how to make a positive impression on people from an American-centered view.
Another approach might be to look at some of the residents who seem to get along well with the staff and ask them for advice.
It might also help the nurses develop a more positive view of him if he made a point of asking them for their input more, and explaining why he chose to do things differently if he does something a nurse doesn't agree with. Little things like making a point of asking them how their day is going, saying "thanks" when asking a nurse to do something, occasionally bringing donuts in for the staff, and other such gestures would also probably improve their perception of his friendliness.


+1


This is the advice you seek. Treat the Nurses like people, and thank them.

That book is also very, very good.
 
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