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Residency in Switzerland

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Maskchamp

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Hi everyone,


I am currently a Canadian student studying in Italy. I have visited Switzerland many time and I absolutely love it. Do you know if non-EU citizens that graduate from an EU school can do their residency there after graduation? Anyone know the process, salary, working conditions, etc? I haven't been able to get a straight answer anywhere.

I speak fluent French (grew up in Montreal) and now fluent Italian, so languages are not a problem.

Thanks!
 

Malthusian99

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Hi everyone,


I am currently a Canadian student studying in Italy. I have visited Switzerland many time and I absolutely love it. Do you know if non-EU citizens that graduate from an EU school can do their residency there after graduation? Anyone know the process, salary, working conditions, etc? I haven't been able to get a straight answer anywhere.

I speak fluent French (grew up in Montreal) and now fluent Italian, so languages are not a problem.

Thanks!

Hello,

Unlike North America and the UK and Ireland, residencies are not structured in the same way:

  • First and foremost, you'll need to have your degree validated by the Swiss Medical Council (which it should do seeing as you're completing it in Italy);
  • Secondly, you will need to get your own work visa. This may seem odd but Switzerland's immigration laws are very strict and only a few visas are given to companies to hire non-EU candidates. Most of these are usually taken up the large cap companies such as Philip Morris and Tetra Pak and hospitals very rarely (from what I've seen) give out said permits, especially not for junior doctors;
  • Assuming the above two steps are successful, you can then apply for a 'residency'. In Switzerland's french speaking part, you would apply as an Médecin Assistant. Unless you are studying at one of the country's medical schools, you will need to directly apply to the relevant head of specialism at the hospital. This is a tough process as the competitive specialisms such as Cardiology and Oncology are extremely tough to get into for non-Swiss applicants (I don't have the stats);
  • Once this process is complete, you will be able to apply for Médecin Adjoint positions and then Chef de Clinique where you are a doctor in your own right and are able to get the FMH specialism.
The time frame for this varies widely, but Oncology, for example, lasts six years from the moment you are taken on by a Chef de Department.

To answer your questions more specifically:

  • Salaries are very tough to state as they depend on the canton, department and hiring conditions (contract negotiations). Switzerland's medical systems is one of the best in the world and medical staff are very well paid. It's not unheard of for senior doctors to clear CHF 400k+ (rare but possible);
  • Working conditions are absolutely fantastic. Junior doctors (Médecin Assistant) work very long hours and are expected to also continue their studies in their free time. If you really want to climb the medical ladder in the country, you will be expected to do a Doctorate in your chosen field. Point being that you'll be treated well but you need to make sure you're up to scratch in your organisation.

If I may give you some honest advice: I would attempt to complete your junior medical years in another country (e.g. UK or Ireland). They are shorter, and the training is, in my honest opinion, better. Once you have a year or two of post-degree experience, apply for a Swiss medical job.

Hope that helps and do let me know if you have any questions.
 
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Maskchamp

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Maltusian,

You are awesome!! Thanks so much. Finally have a decent answer thanks to you. I have no idea what specialty I would like to do yet. I was thinking of the UK too but was leaning towards France as well. I think you are correct in stating to complete my junior doctor years elsewhere then perhaps looking into Switzerland.

I did always hear that the Swiss immigration is extremely strict as you said, I always assumed that would be a big hurdle. As for salary, it is definitely not the most important thing. I mean, after 6 years of not having any income, I just hope I can make something decent to actually start my life. I know doctors in North America, at least junior ones, do work about 80 hours a week. I mean, that's crazy, bad for patients more so than the doctors actually. I know there are laws in Europe about hours, but I'm sure that depends on country to country.

Thanks so much!!!
 

Malthusian99

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You are awesome!! Thanks so much. Finally have a decent answer thanks to you. I have no idea what specialty I would like to do yet. I was thinking of the UK too but was leaning towards France as well. I think you are correct in stating to complete my junior doctor years elsewhere then perhaps looking into Switzerland.

You are very welcome. I hope my answer didn't come off as being negative; I'd rather be honest :).

Both the UK and France are great educationally but I will always lean towards the UK . The reason being that the UK has a two-year structured program (F1 and F2). Salary, I believe, is £22k for the first but rises relatively quickly. Again, during these two years the money is less of a priority as the ability to learn from some truly talented medical professionals.

I did always hear that the Swiss immigration is extremely strict as you said, I always assumed that would be a big hurdle. As for salary, it is definitely not the most important thing. I mean, after 6 years of not having any income, I just hope I can make something decent to actually start my life.

Doctors are very well paid in Switzerland but like everywhere else, junior doctors have to work very long hours.
 
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Maskchamp

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You are very welcome. I hope my answer didn't come off as being negative; I'd rather be honest :).

Both the UK and France are great educationally but I will always lean towards the UK . The reason being that the UK has a two-year structured program (F1 and F2). Salary, I believe, is £22k for the first but rises relatively quickly. Again, during these two years the money is less of a priority as the ability to learn from some truly talented medical professionals.



Doctors are very well paid in Switzerland but like everywhere else, junior doctors have to work very long hours.


Absolutely, thanks for being honest! I don't mind working long hours at all, if I did, then I definitely picked the wrong profession. 80 hours is insane though, I hope it won't be that much to say the least.

Interesting, will be looking there for sure. What happens after F1/F2? Is that type of training/program for any specialty? I can also look it up. It's amazing how every country has their own system.
 

Malthusian99

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Absolutely, thanks for being honest! I don't mind working long hours at all, if I did, then I definitely picked the wrong profession. 80 hours is insane though, I hope it won't be that much to say the least.

Interesting, will be looking there for sure. What happens after F1/F2? Is that type of training/program for any specialty? I can also look it up. It's amazing how every country has their own system.

Apologies for my late reply.

After F1/F2, you will apply for specialisation training, which can last anywhere from four to eight years.

If you don't mind me asking, are you studying in Italy? On one of the english-speaking programs? How is it?
 

Maskchamp

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Apologies for my late reply.

After F1/F2, you will apply for specialisation training, which can last anywhere from four to eight years.

If you don't mind me asking, are you studying in Italy? On one of the english-speaking programs? How is it?


Oh wow, that's a long time, thought perhaps about 4 years. But at this point I'm just trying to pass exams, so I still have some time.

Yes, in Milan at Humanitas, English.
I do, although there are definitely some differences between here and Canada. Very weird exam system and schooling definitely takes some getting used to, but good so far. North America is just too difficult to get into med school.
 

Malthusian99

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Oh wow, that's a long time, thought perhaps about 4 years. But at this point I'm just trying to pass exams, so I still have some time.

Understood but again, this depends on the specialisation and it may have changed since I last checked.

Yes, in Milan at Humanitas, English.

I do, although there are definitely some differences between here and Canada. Very weird exam system and schooling definitely takes some getting used to, but good so far. North America is just too difficult to get into med school.

Do you mind elaborating? I'm curious for a friend of mine who is applying and wants to study medicine in English instead of French, German or Italian (Swiss system).
 

Maskchamp

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So it's been interesting. The application process is very easy, it's the IMAT for the public schools, and each private school have their own exam. For Humanitas, it' the UKCAT. The way it works is that you have one course, say Anatomy, and for the entire course, it's one exam. It's not like in North America where the first midterm make sup say 30% of your grad, the second one 25%, etc. The teaching I find is excellent, but I have heard that it is much better in private schools so I can't comment about the public ones. The only problem is that for some profs, English is not their native language, so it can be a bit difficult to follow, but most of ours, their English is great. The other thing is how disorganized things are. I mean, it's insane, and it definitely bothers the North Americans and the germans, and other European nations. Class can start late, schedule changes constantly.

Mistakes are constant made about exam scheduling, the course can be really disorganized and topics can be jumped around and so forth. Maybe it's just my school, but I'm not sure. I always heard Italians are terrible at organizing thing so the way the school runs can be very frustrating sometimes. The grading is that a 60% is a pass, which is good. Then you have an oral examination, some subjects don't but most do. It can be quite nerve-racking. So you can do very bad on the written, but do very well on the oral and your grade can jump by over 20%. It can also be the other way around though. Tests usually have 3/4 sections and you need to pass each with a 60% to pass the exam. Some people will get a 55/60 but still fail the exam cause they got say only 5/10 on the biochem part but a 100% on the other sections. And then you have to retake the entire exam, which is REALLY annoying. But you have so many tries, it's crazy. You can take the same exam up to 7 times in most cases. The interesting thing is that you can take the exam for that course in February when it's over, or you can wait even until September to take it, it's very flexible, it's pretty nice actually. In university in Canada if you missed a mid-term/final exam, it was the end of the world no? The summer there is no school, it's just an exam every 15 days of whatever subject you followed. No exam in august, but then again in September until school starts in October.

A big bonus though, is that if you are coming from university and you already have a degree, you can get a ton of credits. I got 35 credits my first year cause I had done the bio/physics/chem/biochem/genetics/molecular bio/histology. It was great, huge load off.

Let's not forget about learning Italian. Once you get to 3rd year and start clinicals, your Italian has to be decent enough to take a history and talk. It's not too bad/hard after living in the country for 2 years, but some people have a lot of trouble with it, especially if they only speak English. If you get to the 3rd year and don't speak any Italian, it's a problem, even if your marks are stellar. You can't ask a 65 year old from Naples how he's feeling in English.

The bureaucracy is insane, that's another story, can write a novel on that. It's ridiculous, and again, so many mistakes, inefficiency, disorganization.

Overall, I'm pretty happy. Feel like I'm getting a very good education and I know it will be hard to go back to Canada, but like I mentioned previously, I love Europe and looking into other countries. Food is great here obviously, lots to do. Italy does have everything if you think about it. Wine, food, history, art, Alps, beaches and it's location is great. Can fly to Paris for the weekend for very cheap. Cost of living is not too high compared to other European cities. I think the big thing is patience, 6 years is a long freakin time. So yea, that's about it. If you have any other questions, please let me know. Always happy to answer!
 
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graciec

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Hi @Maskchamp Im a fellow Canadian too. I'm thinking of applying to Humanitas this year. Do you happen to know where most grads end up? Have there been graduates who have gotten residencies in Canada or the US? Is it possible to do electives back home or even in the UK?
In your opinion, if you could go back would you still have chosen Humanitas or a different school in Italy or in Europe?

Any advice would be appreciated!!
 

Maskchamp

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Hi @Maskchamp Im a fellow Canadian too. I'm thinking of applying to Humanitas this year. Do you happen to know where most grads end up? Have there been graduates who have gotten residencies in Canada or the US? Is it possible to do electives back home or even in the UK?
In your opinion, if you could go back would you still have chosen Humanitas or a different school in Italy or in Europe?

Any advice would be appreciated!!

Hi there,

I actually do not know too specifically. I know some people that definitely did electives/internships in the US and abroad in the UK and many other places in Europe. One even in Botswana.

As for Canada, for the international students, it's kind of hidden secret. People think North America, they think of the US right away so I do not know if anyone has gotten a residency in Canada. For the graduates, they are 4 years above me so I do not know any 6th years or those that have finished, but I can actually find out.

There are a lot of IMGs in Canada so I'm sure it's not impossible to go back home. Italy is quite strong with medicine and has a great reputation (the oldest med school is in Bologna). We have an open presentation/talk with neurosurgeons next week that is only available for students, and they are from US, Chile, Germany, France, and few more places. The physican community definitely has heard about the school. One of our new profs studied at Harvard med and she will be teaching. Non-italian.

If I could go back, I think yes, I would have chosen Humanitas again. They do care about their students and I feel like they do really want you to pass, some schools you are just a number but a number of us feel pretty well taken care of here. Facilities are brand new, profs are great, although everything is quite disorganized. I am not too familiar with other schools in Europe, but Humanitas is easy to get into, and you do have to learn Italian, which is a BEAUTIFUL language, so it is actually fun. Our class is 130, 2 Canadians, I wanna say 5 Americans, about 20 from other European countries, about 10 from Middle East, 15 or so from Southeast Asia, the rest Italians.

It just takes getting used to the teaching style and the way everything is run, very very different than North America. That was the toughest part honestly, not the culture shock or language barrier or anything else like that. The bureaucracy is insane, and I always felt that it was much easier to get into Humanitas than dealing with the bureaucracy, but once you get past it, it's a relief.

Are attending an undergrad right now?
 
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DrRoc

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Hello,

Unlike North America and the UK and Ireland, residencies are not structured in the same way:

  • First and foremost, you'll need to have your degree validated by the Swiss Medical Council (which it should do seeing as you're completing it in Italy);
  • Secondly, you will need to get your own work visa. This may seem odd but Switzerland's immigration laws are very strict and only a few visas are given to companies to hire non-EU candidates. Most of these are usually taken up the large cap companies such as Philip Morris and Tetra Pak and hospitals very rarely (from what I've seen) give out said permits, especially not for junior doctors;
  • Assuming the above two steps are successful, you can then apply for a 'residency'. In Switzerland's french speaking part, you would apply as an Médecin Assistant. Unless you are studying at one of the country's medical schools, you will need to directly apply to the relevant head of specialism at the hospital. This is a tough process as the competitive specialisms such as Cardiology and Oncology are extremely tough to get into for non-Swiss applicants (I don't have the stats);
  • Once this process is complete, you will be able to apply for Médecin Adjoint positions and then Chef de Clinique where you are a doctor in your own right and are able to get the FMH specialism.
The time frame for this varies widely, but Oncology, for example, lasts six years from the moment you are taken on by a Chef de Department.

To answer your questions more specifically:

  • Salaries are very tough to state as they depend on the canton, department and hiring conditions (contract negotiations). Switzerland's medical systems is one of the best in the world and medical staff are very well paid. It's not unheard of for senior doctors to clear CHF 400k+ (rare but possible);
  • Working conditions are absolutely fantastic. Junior doctors (Médecin Assistant) work very long hours and are expected to also continue their studies in their free time. If you really want to climb the medical ladder in the country, you will be expected to do a Doctorate in your chosen field. Point being that you'll be treated well but you need to make sure you're up to scratch in your organisation.

If I may give you some honest advice: I would attempt to complete your junior medical years in another country (e.g. UK or Ireland). They are shorter, and the training is, in my honest opinion, better. Once you have a year or two of post-degree experience, apply for a Swiss medical job.

Hope that helps and do let me know if you have any questions.
Hi,
Are you in Switzerland now? Training? Or Student?
 

Maskchamp

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I'm a student in Italy, hoping to find some internships next summer in Switzerland just get my foot in the door. I hope it all works out.
 
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Maskchamp

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At the moment, no. Some of our profs I believe know a few and a friend is starting there in November so I'll just be sending out e-mails and hope someone replies.
 

DrRoc

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At the moment, no. Some of our profs I believe know a few and a friend is starting there in November so I'll just be sending out e-mails and hope someone replies.
What is your email? Are you on WhatsApp or Viber?
 

Maskchamp

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What is your email? Are you on WhatsApp or Viber?

Didn't mean to come as rude or anything, just that there are a lot of spammers here and try not fall into those traps. I'm always happy to meet/contact new people on SDN so if there is anything I can do even, please message me. Thanks.
 

Sabina Dranova

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Hello,
I am EU citizen who finished university this year and got medical diploma. Looking for opportunities to do internship in Switerland. Wanted to do it on France but apparently I can’t apply to ECN exam anymore because I got my degree already and it’s not impossible. How is it about Switzerland? Can I do internship there with only french language?
Hello,

Unlike North America and the UK and Ireland, residencies are not structured in the same way:

  • First and foremost, you'll need to have your degree validated by the Swiss Medical Council (which it should do seeing as you're completing it in Italy);
  • Secondly, you will need to get your own work visa. This may seem odd but Switzerland's immigration laws are very strict and only a few visas are given to companies to hire non-EU candidates. Most of these are usually taken up the large cap companies such as Philip Morris and Tetra Pak and hospitals very rarely (from what I've seen) give out said permits, especially not for junior doctors;
  • Assuming the above two steps are successful, you can then apply for a 'residency'. In Switzerland's french speaking part, you would apply as an Médecin Assistant. Unless you are studying at one of the country's medical schools, you will need to directly apply to the relevant head of specialism at the hospital. This is a tough process as the competitive specialisms such as Cardiology and Oncology are extremely tough to get into for non-Swiss applicants (I don't have the stats);
  • Once this process is complete, you will be able to apply for Médecin Adjoint positions and then Chef de Clinique where you are a doctor in your own right and are able to get the FMH specialism.
The time frame for this varies widely, but Oncology, for example, lasts six years from the moment you are taken on by a Chef de Department.

To answer your questions more specifically:

  • Salaries are very tough to state as they depend on the canton, department and hiring conditions (contract negotiations). Switzerland's medical systems is one of the best in the world and medical staff are very well paid. It's not unheard of for senior doctors to clear CHF 400k+ (rare but possible);
  • Working conditions are absolutely fantastic. Junior doctors (Médecin Assistant) work very long hours and are expected to also continue their studies in their free time. If you really want to climb the medical ladder in the country, you will be expected to do a Doctorate in your chosen field. Point being that you'll be treated well but you need to make sure you're up to scratch in your organisation.

If I may give you some honest advice: I would attempt to complete your junior medical years in another country (e.g. UK or Ireland). They are shorter, and the training is, in my honest opinion, better. Once you have a year or two of post-degree experience, apply for a Swiss medical job.

Hope that helps and do let me know if you have any questions.
I
Hello,

Unlike North America and the UK and Ireland, residencies are not structured in the same way:

  • First and foremost, you'll need to have your degree validated by the Swiss Medical Council (which it should do seeing as you're completing it in Italy);
  • Secondly, you will need to get your own work visa. This may seem odd but Switzerland's immigration laws are very strict and only a few visas are given to companies to hire non-EU candidates. Most of these are usually taken up the large cap companies such as Philip Morris and Tetra Pak and hospitals very rarely (from what I've seen) give out said permits, especially not for junior doctors;
  • Assuming the above two steps are successful, you can then apply for a 'residency'. In Switzerland's french speaking part, you would apply as an Médecin Assistant. Unless you are studying at one of the country's medical schools, you will need to directly apply to the relevant head of specialism at the hospital. This is a tough process as the competitive specialisms such as Cardiology and Oncology are extremely tough to get into for non-Swiss applicants (I don't have the stats);
  • Once this process is complete, you will be able to apply for Médecin Adjoint positions and then Chef de Clinique where you are a doctor in your own right and are able to get the FMH specialism.
The time frame for this varies widely, but Oncology, for example, lasts six years from the moment you are taken on by a Chef de Department.

To answer your questions more specifically:

  • Salaries are very tough to state as they depend on the canton, department and hiring conditions (contract negotiations). Switzerland's medical systems is one of the best in the world and medical staff are very well paid. It's not unheard of for senior doctors to clear CHF 400k+ (rare but possible);
  • Working conditions are absolutely fantastic. Junior doctors (Médecin Assistant) work very long hours and are expected to also continue their studies in their free time. If you really want to climb the medical ladder in the country, you will be expected to do a Doctorate in your chosen field. Point being that you'll be treated well but you need to make sure you're up to scratch in your organisation.

If I may give you some honest advice: I would attempt to complete your junior medical years in another country (e.g. UK or Ireland). They are shorter, and the training is, in my honest opinion, better. Once you have a year or two of post-degree experience, apply for a Swiss medical job.

Hope that helps and do let me know if you have any questions.
Hi everyone,


I am currently a Canadian student studying in Italy. I have visited Switzerland many time and I absolutely love it. Do you know if non-EU citizens that graduate from an EU school can do their residency there after graduation? Anyone know the process, salary, working conditions, etc? I haven't been able to get a straight answer anywhere.

I speak fluent French (grew up in Montreal) and now fluent Italian, so languages are not a problem.

Thanks!
 

Malthusian99

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Hello,
I am EU citizen who finished university this year and got medical diploma. Looking for opportunities to do internship in Switerland. Wanted to do it on France but apparently I can’t apply to ECN exam anymore because I got my degree already and it’s not impossible. How is it about Switzerland? Can I do internship there with only french language?

I

Hello Sabina,

In order to get an internship, you will need to apply directly to the department or service you want to work in. This requires a complete application (usually a motivation letter, CV and references) which needs to be sent to the department leader. Please refer directly to the hospital you're interested in working at.

Do you speak one of the country's national languages? If not, you won't get an internship here even though everyone is relatively fluent in English.
 
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Sabina Dranova

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I am learning french now, so I will apply only when I get B2 level in it. I am moving to France now, will be living 13 km from Swiss border. I can’t apply in France so that’s why I hope to do it in Switzerland, but living in France. Do you know if EU citizens need work permit?
Hello Sabina,

In order to get an internship, you will need to apply directly to the department or service you want to work in. This requires a complete application (usually a motivation letter, CV and references) which needs to be sent to the department leader. Please refer directly to the hospital you're interested in working at.

Do you speak one of the country's national languages? If not, you won't get an internship here even though everyone is relatively fluent in English.
 

Malthusian99

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I am learning french now, so I will apply only when I get B2 level in it. I am moving to France now, will be living 13 km from Swiss border. I can’t apply in France so that’s why I hope to do it in Switzerland, but living in France. Do you know if EU citizens need work permit?

Although the requirement is B2, you'll probably be asked to have a higher level. Yes, they do need a permit but they're usually kept on the same level as Swiss citizens when applying for work.

As for the ECN, have you considered sitting for it?
 

Sabina Dranova

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Is it likely not to get the work permit? And is the application process for internship happening only once a year at summer or you can apply for it whenever you want?
I would want to do it in France, but since I already have my diploma, got it in June 2018 I can’t apply for ECN exam anymore. You are not allowed to skip a year. So stupid.
Although the requirement is B2, you'll probably be asked to have a higher level. Yes, they do need a permit but they're usually kept on the same level as Swiss citizens when applying for work.

As for the ECN, have you considered sitting for it?
 
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Malthusian99

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Is it likely not to get the work permit? And is the application process for internship happening only once a year at summer or you can apply for it whenever you want?
I would want to do it in France, but since I already have my diploma, got it in June 2018 I can’t apply for ECN exam anymore. You are not allowed to skip a year. So stupid.

Oh, I was unaware of that.

The work permit is given once you have a job secured. Don't worry too much about that as you are an EU citizen and once you have employment, you will automatically be given the appropriate permit.

Regarding the application cycle, there's no official process or timeline in place. I would however recommend you apply in summer as it's when departments have a better idea of headcount. I really do want to warn you: hospitals are very small here and internships are very difficult to get if you haven't graduated from a local university. I would recommend you cast your net wide and apply to as many departments and specialities as you can. You may not get your first choice right away but you can always network your way into a department at a later stage.
 

Sabina Dranova

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Thank you a lot for answers.
I have one more question if you don’t mind. I still don’t understand how the education process in internship takes place. I’ve read something that you need to change places every year. But what if you can’t find new place? How is the study process controled - is there some kind of diary with the manipulations you need to perform during internship or is it concrete amount of years? Can’t find any information about the system of the education in the internship there.

Oh, I was unaware of that.

The work permit is given once you have a job secured. Don't worry too much about that as you are an EU citizen and once you have employment, you will automatically be given the appropriate permit.

Regarding the application cycle, there's no official process or timeline in place. I would however recommend you apply in summer as it's when departments have a better idea of headcount. I really do want to warn you: hospitals are very small here and internships are very difficult to get if you haven't graduated from a local university. I would recommend you cast your net wide and apply to as many departments and specialities as you can. You may not get your first choice right away but you can always network your way into a department at a later stage.
Thank you.
 

Malthusian99

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Thank you a lot for answers.
I have one more question if you don’t mind. I still don’t understand how the education process in internship takes place. I’ve read something that you need to change places every year. But what if you can’t find new place? How is the study process controled - is there some kind of diary with the manipulations you need to perform during internship or is it concrete amount of years? Can’t find any information about the system of the education in the internship there.


Thank you.

There's a big difference between an internship and what's called the postgraduate education. The latter is the specialisation qualification and is done within a department. An internship is a temporary contract where senior doctors will train you in small procedures but you're not really contributing towards your specialisation education. Which one are you specifically referring to?
 

Sabina Dranova

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I need postgraduate education. As I understand it’s called doctors assistant there, righ? So what is the procedure of getting into it and how is it realized?
I understand that my chances are not as high as for Swiss graduate so I am ok to start any speciality. Most important is to get in. I also hope that fluent English and Russian will be small bonus. Do you know which specialities are relatively easier to get ?
There's a big difference between an internship and what's called the postgraduate education. The latter is the specialisation qualification and is done within a department. An internship is a temporary contract where senior doctors will train you in small procedures but you're not really contributing towards your specialisation education. Which one are you specifically referring to?
 
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StrivingtoFit

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Hello,
I am currently a middle eastern medical student studying in Egypt. I want to know what are the steps required for me to get into Swiss medical residency? And what is the likelihood that I would get into any ?Do you have any suggestions for better IMG friendly EU/non-EU residencies ? As a non-EU hijabi, will I be beset with even greater hurdles for my religion and origins ?
 

Malthusian99

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Hello,
I am currently a middle eastern medical student studying in Egypt. I want to know what are the steps required for me to get into Swiss medical residency? And what is the likelihood that I would get into any ?Do you have any suggestions for better IMG friendly EU/non-EU residencies ? As a non-EU hijabi, will I be beset with even greater hurdles for my religion and origins ?

If you start you your search with a victim mentality, then yes, you will find it very difficult because the moment you are rejected, you'll assume it's because you're Muslim (which is not the case as the law is the law, regardless of nationality).

Now, once you feel you can overcome that, let's focus on the facts:

You're non-EU. More than your race or religion, where you did your basic medical education will mean more than anything. Most EU countries follow a common directive, which means that you'll need to choose a country and more or less stick with it for good. Switzerland is complicated because you'll need to speak one or (ideally) more than one of the national languages. If you speak French either/or German, then you'll need to apply to the authorities for your diploma to be recognised (this will usually mean you'll need to pass multiple exams and/or pass many of the core modules in the six years of medical school.

The UK does seem to be more friendly towards extra-EU nationals but do bear in mind that with Brexit, there is a great deal of uncertainty in terms of the future of their diplomas.
 

Lila2404

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hello I am new in this forum , in one year I 'll be graduated.
I would like to do my residency in Switzerland but I don't know how to do.
So this summer I would like to do an internship of one month there but I don't know any doctors there.
if anyone has any informations or has already done that can you please help me !
 

metatron777

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Hi everyone,


I am currently a Canadian student studying in Italy. I have visited Switzerland many time and I absolutely love it. Do you know if non-EU citizens that graduate from an EU school can do their residency there after graduation? Anyone know the process, salary, working conditions, etc? I haven't been able to get a straight answer anywhere.

I speak fluent French (grew up in Montreal) and now fluent Italian, so languages are not a problem.

Thanks!
Hello,

I am also a Canadian student studying medicine in Europe. I understand that the original post was about two years ago but I only came across this information now. I am thinking of the same path. I have a job offer from a swiss hospital and I need to get MEBEKO recognition of my medical diploma (The Swiss ask for this if your medical diploma is from Switzerland, but you could do it if you studied in EU). Upon reading the required documents I need to send them, I noticed that they don't ask for French proficiency test results (DELF). Did you manage to go to Switzerland already? if so, what was your experience with MEBEKO? They take their sweet time responding to my emails.
 

Tangerine123

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Hello,

I am also a Canadian student studying medicine in Europe. I understand that the original post was about two years ago but I only came across this information now. I am thinking of the same path. I have a job offer from a swiss hospital and I need to get MEBEKO recognition of my medical diploma (The Swiss ask for this if your medical diploma is from Switzerland, but you could do it if you studied in EU). Upon reading the required documents I need to send them, I noticed that they don't ask for French proficiency test results (DELF). Did you manage to go to Switzerland already? if so, what was your experience with MEBEKO? They take their sweet time responding to my emails.
Einer der folgenden Nachweise (im Original oder in originalbeglaubigter Kopie) ist zu erbringen:

a. international anerkanntes Sprachdiplom, mindestens Niveau B2 des Gemeinsamen Europäi-
schen Referenzrahmens für Sprachen, nicht älter als sechs Jahre; oder

b. einen in der entsprechenden Sprache erworbenen Aus- oder Weiterbildungsabschluss des uni-
versitären Medizinalberufs; oder

c. Arbeitserfahrung in der entsprechenden Sprache im betreffenden universitären Medizinalberuf
von drei Jahren innerhalb der letzten zehn Jahre.
 

julie888

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Hello,

I am also a Canadian student studying medicine in Europe. I understand that the original post was about two years ago but I only came across this information now. I am thinking of the same path. I have a job offer from a swiss hospital and I need to get MEBEKO recognition of my medical diploma (The Swiss ask for this if your medical diploma is from Switzerland, but you could do it if you studied in EU). Upon reading the required documents I need to send them, I noticed that they don't ask for French proficiency test results (DELF). Did you manage to go to Switzerland already? if so, what was your experience with MEBEKO? They take their sweet time responding to my emails.
Hey I am also a Canadian student studying in Europe and was wondering whether you could explain more about where and how to apply?
 
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