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Resource Links for SLPs and Audiologists

Discussion in 'Audiology [ Au.D ]' started by Beau Geste, May 4, 2007.

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  2. audstudent

    audstudent Audiology Student 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 6, 2007
    I know the audiology forum is small, thus we are grouped w/SLPs. However, maybe we should have separate threads within this forum. This way we don't have to waste our time reading SLP discussions.

    I don't have anything against SLPs, but just like I am not interested in reading about RNs, MDs, DDS, etc.,

    What do you all think?

    :confused:
     
  3. Beau Geste

    Beau Geste yah mo b there Bronze Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    There is not much traffic in this forum as it is. With SLPs and audiologists having enough in common, they are combined.
     
  4. audstudent

    audstudent Audiology Student 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 6, 2007
    I don't think SLPs and AuDs have much in common. Aside from being in the same dept in many hospitals. In many hospitals, PTs, OTs, RecTs, and SLPs are also grouped together. But you would not group SLPs with the other therapy forums, would you?

    Anyhow, I did not say we needed to separate them. I just thought it would be a good idea to group SLPs and AuDs into separate groups within this AuD and SLP forum. Maybe by heading or something.

    Just an idea.
     
  5. Beau Geste

    Beau Geste yah mo b there Bronze Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    As far as education, yes there are a similarities, right down to the ASHA requirements of a certain number of classroom hours and clinical hours in the reciprocal area.

    Clinically, there might be overlap, there might not be, depending on where the clinician works.

    In addition, SDN is trying to keep the number of separate forums down, especially if they are not visited or posted in very often. This combined forum was created almost 6 months ago and there are only 20 posts. While it would be nice to have separate forums for separate professions, unfortunately this is not realistic at this time due to limited content and traffic.

    Perhaps if there were hundreds or thousands of posts in each topic of SLP and Audiology in a shorter time span they could be separated out.

    As of now, they stay together.
     
  6. audstudent

    audstudent Audiology Student 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 6, 2007
    Megboo,

    I think you may be confused about what AuDs and SLPs do. The education requirements are not similar at all. I am not sure where you got that idea from.

    Moreover, ASHA certification is not a requirement to be a practicing AuD. In fact, many (if not most) newer AuDs are not even ASHA members, opting instead to be members of AAA instead.

    And..... I just voiced an opinion (you seem to be a little annoyed by my post, but isn't that what forums are for: voicing opinions??).

    I would love for the 2 forums to be separate, but I understand your position. Maybe in the future.
     
  7. Beau Geste

    Beau Geste yah mo b there Bronze Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    I have practiced as an SLP in a few states and my employers (hospitals) only hired certified members of ASHA. Many reimbursement agencies (e.g. insurance companies) feel that the CFY is necessary which is why they use ASHA as their standard. I am aware that many audiologists prefer to be members of AAA. That's fine. However, unlike ASHA, there is no CFY, which makes it more of an extracurricular body than a certifying agency. While you do not need the CFY per se to get a job, your chances of employment go up significantly as do your opportunities for claim reimbursement.

    I also spent a few years in a PhD program that consisted of both audiologists and speech-language pathologists and I know enough to say that there is crossover in education. I also have taken a few graduate-level audiology courses for continuing ed credit (and more education in audiology since I've had several children lately who had hearing issues) and was thankful for my SLP background that made things a little easier.

    I'm not saying speech-language pathology and audiology are the same, but on topics like CAPD, sign language, aural rehabilitation and others, I've seen both speech-language pathologists and audiologists tackle these.

    I'm not sure why you feel I'm annoyed - I only stated the facts as to why there can't be separation of the threads right now. You are free to post your opinions, however you may get responses that don't agree with you.
     
  8. audstudent

    audstudent Audiology Student 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 6, 2007
    Megboo,

    Ok, I know what's going on now. You are familiar with the old master's model for audiologists. There are many differences now:

    1.) The master's program required 9 months of clinical training (CFY), the student was essentially an employee for those 9 months. The AuD program requires an externship, as a student, rather than an employee.

    2.) The master's program required 250 to 350 hours of clinical experience to qualify for graduation. The AuD program requires at least 1880 clinical hours of clinical experience.

    3.) Only 2 states require ASHA certification (CCC/A) to practice audiology. And that will change very soon. There are a few agencies and hospitals that still require CCC/A to practice audiology. However, that is mainly due to the fact that they are not familiar with the AuD program.
    The experience of all new graduates is that as soon as they inform their "would be" employers about the new requirements, they immediately (or soon thereafter) change their hiring requirements.

    Employers have to change their hiring requirements, unless they don't want to hire new graduates. Only the older master degreed audiologits will eventually have their CCC/A.

    Hope this helps. I understand how you would be confused. The SLP is still a masters program, requires a CFY and ASHA certification. And you are right that the masters audiology program was very similar.
     
  9. audstudent

    audstudent Audiology Student 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 6, 2007
    Oh! I forgot.

    Liscensure is what is needed to practice and 3rd party reimbursement
    requires liscensure not CCC/A.

    New AuD programs do not require specific course work or clinical hours in speech language pathology.
     
  10. Beau Geste

    Beau Geste yah mo b there Bronze Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Many 3rd parties have the stipulation that they will only reimburse if you hold the CCC. I do all my own billing and it's in my contracts with many insurance companies (I do business in IL).

    I am aware of the changes the AuD brought about from the M.S. I know many of the AuD programs in IL require a course in language development of some sort. Northern Illinois University, in particular, has the AuD students take the grad level language development class along with the SLP students. It is also imperative that undergraduate students have sufficient hours in both audiology courses and speech-language pathology courses as pre-requisites to graduate programs. This is evidence of educational overlap between the two professions. I've already outlined professional overlap of treatment areas in a previous post.

    The CFY is not a part of a formal education process at any university. It's completed AFTER graduation and is usually completed after 9 months of full-time work or 18 months of part-time work. You can refer to the ASHA website for more detail. I completed mine in New Zealand after I finished my M.S. under the guide of an American SLP.

    As an employer and in discussions with other employers, they do not (and I would not) hire audiologists OR SLPs without their CCC or in their CFY year. It serves as a measure of added competence in the Communication Disorders profession. That does not mean that all employers require the CFY/CCC, however more require it than do not. If AAA offered their own type of CFY/CCC credentialing, I'm sure it would take the place of ASHA (and would be fine with most if not all employers). As of now, it's not available, so the default is the ASHA CCC. As a side note, SLPs have the option of also not obtaining their CCC/SLP credential, however employment is limited for them. Even obtaining malpractice insurance is hard without CCC endorsement.

    Also, while most states do not require the CCC to obtain licensure, reciprocity is granted much easier if you hold the CCC in lieu of reporting Praxis scores and evidence of graduate clock hours. At least this is the case in IL and surrounding states. Some state agencies (such as Mississippi State Board of Education) give salary increases for holding a CCC. See here

    If you are a student, as your user name suggests, you'll find out soon enough when you enter the workforce the benefits or no benefits to having the CCC/A if you do or don't decide to pursue it.
     
  11. audstudent

    audstudent Audiology Student 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 6, 2007
    The American Board of Audiology offers the credential of Board Certification in Audiology. It also offers specialty certification in CI.

    Most employment requirements state "CCC eligible"; which all audiology graduates are.

    Licensure is what defines the legal right to practice audiology not CCC/A, thus NO state requires CCC/A to obtain the liscense.

    From Audiology.org: "No state licensure board requires an applicant to pay membership dues or a certification fee to any voluntary professional organization as a condition of licensure--you do NOT have to maintain your CCC/A to keep your state license".

    I don't know Meg Boo, you seem to be knowledgeable in many Audiology areas. However, I do think you give a lot erronous info. I encourage everyone w/questions about the Audiology profession to go to the AAA, ADA, and ASHA websites to get current data.
     
  12. Beau Geste

    Beau Geste yah mo b there Bronze Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    I have never stated that the CCC is an absolutely mandatory certification. My position stands that many employers (I am an employer and I know many other employers) do in fact require it and it makes reciprocal state licensure a lot easier to obtain.

    This is fact, not erroneous information.

    In the future, please continue point out what you feel is erroneous so I can address your claims.

    I realize that many audiologists are fed up with ASHA and prefer the AAA as their governing body - fine, whatever. I'm not an audiologist, so I stick with ASHA since it's the only major SLP group. As far as the AAA goes, I had not realized until recently reviewing the website that the board certification has now extended into doctoral program graduates and encompasses a program similar to the CFY. The AAA has made many more changes in the last few years as the up and coming audiologist group that I thought.

    As a blanket statement for posters: I am not the president of ASHA or of AAA - I am a post-bacc student applying to medical school this year and I have a more than full-time private practice I maintain (and have for three years), therefore I am not able to spend all of my free time looking up all things audiology. I appreciate the noted concerns, especially with AAA (http://www.americanboardofaudiology.org/FAQs/Boardcert/) but you must realize that the mods and advisors are here to help, not to try to lead you astray. We've got experience in the field, but that doesn't mean we don't make mistakes.
     

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