ssa915

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I was accepted to Ross, and thinking of applying to RCSI.

The reason: since both are considered FMGs, I might as well go somewhere where the medical school is located in an area where i'm not isolated from the rest of the world, providing me with some sanity... any comments?

I've read the threads about residency issues when coming from Ireland... they seem to be equal

Would anyone choose one over the other, and why?
 

RRT2MD

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ssa915 said:
I was accepted to Ross, and thinking of applying to RCSI.

The reason: since both are considered FMGs, I might as well go somewhere where the medical school is located in an area where i'm not isolated from the rest of the world, providing me with some sanity... any comments?

I've read the threads about residency issues when coming from Ireland... they seem to be equal

Would anyone choose one over the other, and why?
From what I have read, which is'nt a great deal, I would go through with Ross.

Ross provides clerkships in the US, correct? That's a plus.
At Ross most of the students are from the US so there is more of an incentive to pass the USMLE I on the first sitting.
I would pressure Ross for durable results for Resident Matching if you are concerned about a competitve specialty.
I'm not certain, is RCSI a 4 or 5 year program?

And once the loan goes through you will be ssa915, MS1

I would go w/ Ross if I had the acceptence letter in hand.

Good Luck.
 

Arb

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Ross for sure. You graduate in 3.5 years versus 5 years and you'll save tens of thousands of dollars. Plus, you can graduate in January, early enough to get a H1b visa if you want one. Plus, you do ALL of your clinical training at US hospitals which, gives you a step up when you apply for residency (and bypass the apparent difference in clinical training). Plus a huge network of alumni can always be an advantage.
 

RRT2MD

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Arb said:
Ross for sure. You graduate in 3.5 years versus 5 years and you'll save tens of thousands of dollars. Plus, you can graduate in January, early enough to get a H1b visa if you want one. Plus, you do ALL of your clinical training at US hospitals which, gives you a step up when you apply for residency (and bypass the apparent difference in clinical training). Plus a huge network of alumni can always be an advantage.
3.5 years!!! Wow!!!

I'm gonna have to revisit thier web site.

So far 2 votes.

See what RN2MD thinks, I'm fairly certain she is at Ross.

Also, smile.ie has a perspective on the 'Emerald' schools.
 
M

Mr. McDuck

I got accepted to a few Caribbean schools last year and decided to wait and apply to Irish schools this year. I just knew I wouldn't be able to handle living in the Caribbean for that long. There were other factors, but I basically weighed them out and was okay with the extra year and a half of tuition and study if it means I get to study where I want to study.

You make the decision for yourself, but I chose Ireland (fingers crossed!).
 

Arb

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You spend just about 16 months on the island in Ross and you get a few weeks of break after every term. The rest of the time you are in Miami and American hospitals.
 
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Mr. McDuck

That's 16 months too long for me. I've been there before, and I just know I couldn't stand it.
 

dirtymac42

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Are you american or do you plan on practising in the states? If so, i would think that ross might be a better choice for you. However, if u plan on practising almost anywhere else (ie, a country that can't afford to spend nearly $2 trillion a year on top of the line medical equipment), i would put forth that the clinical training at RCSI is superior. Surgeons has students from top schools in the States (Mayo, Hopkins, etc) and the rest of Europe do electives in Ireland and they do woefully to be honest (and these are students that scored 90+ on their Step 1).

This is essentially becauase more time must be spent examining a patient and less time ordering exciting new tests because either they're too expensive or don't exist in ireland yet.

But, as far as who gets better positions in the States afterwards, i can't say because i don't know. It'd be nice to publish a list, an official list not just anecdotal info, of a class at Ross and where they matched and a north american class at RCSI and where they matched.

(oh, and you get to travel europe on ur holidays, yaaa!) hah
 
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ssa915

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dirtymac42 said:
Are you american or do you plan on practising in the states? If so, i would think that ross might be a better choice for you. However, if u plan on practising almost anywhere else (ie, a country that can't afford to spend nearly $2 trillion a year on top of the line medical equipment), i would put forth that the clinical training at RCSI is superior. Surgeons has students from top schools in the States (Mayo, Hopkins, etc) and the rest of Europe do electives in Ireland and they do woefully to be honest (and these are students that scored 90+ on their Step 1).

This is essentially becauase more time must be spent examining a patient and less time ordering exciting new tests because either they're too expensive or don't exist in ireland yet.

But, as far as who gets better positions in the States afterwards, i can't say because i don't know. It'd be nice to publish a list, an official list not just anecdotal info, of a class at Ross and where they matched and a north american class at RCSI and where they matched.

(oh, and you get to travel europe on ur holidays, yaaa!) hah
Yes I am american, and yes I do plan on practising in the states. It just makes more sense to go to a university that is actually established (like ireland schools, since late 1800's), not just a school that churns out doctors like a factory...

But, maybe residency programs in the US prefer caribbean over Ireland b/c they are more tightly connected in the US... ???
 
M

Mr. McDuck

I'm not sure. All I have is anecdotal evidence, but the surgeons I work with that went to school in Ireland had no problem getting surgical residency spots. Of course, this was before the recent rise in competitivness. But, compare that to the experiences of many people on this board who come from the Caribbean and can get nothing but FM or IM spots. Two docs I work with went to SGU and are in OB. They said it would be hard to get a general surgery spot.

But, again, this is all anecdotal. It's hard to tell without hard evidence in the form of a match list.
 
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ssa915

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Billy Shears said:
I'm not sure. All I have is anecdotal evidence, but the surgeons I work with that went to school in Ireland had no problem getting surgical residency spots. Of course, this was before the recent rise in competitivness. But, compare that to the experiences of many people on this board who come from the Caribbean and can get nothing but FM or IM spots. Two docs I work with went to SGU and are in OB. They said it would be hard to get a general surgery spot.

But, again, this is all anecdotal. It's hard to tell without hard evidence in the form of a match list.
Im curious... are you a resident right now in gen surgery?
 
M

Mr. McDuck

No, I'm a first assistant in general and vascular surgery. I'm actually applying to UCD and RCSI this season. I applied to a few schools in the Caribbean last year, but decided not to enroll. I don't mean to sound like I'm bashing the Caribbean; I just know that I personally would be unhappy there, even with the MD at the end. Leukocyte will tell you how hard it is to get a surgical spot coming from the Caribbean. I'm sure it's hard from Ireland too, but I've decided to go to Ireland (assuming I get in :fingerscrossedsmiliethatdoesn'texist: ).
 
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ssa915

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Billy Shears said:
No, I'm a first assistant in general and vascular surgery. I'm actually applying to UCD and RCSI this season. I applied to a few schools in the Caribbean last year, but decided not to enroll. I don't mean to sound like I'm bashing the Caribbean; I just know that I personally would be unhappy there, even with the MD at the end. Leukocyte will tell you how hard it is to get a surgical spot coming from the Caribbean. I'm sure it's hard from Ireland too, but I've decided to go to Ireland (assuming I get in :fingerscrossedsmiliethatdoesn'texist: ).
Well goodluck...u never know, i might end up being your classmate at RCSI ;)

Im guessing you aren't applying in the U.S. because you don't think your stats are competetive enough? any reason why u don't want to apply in the US?
 
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ssa915

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Billy Shears said:
No, I'm a first assistant in general and vascular surgery. I'm actually applying to UCD and RCSI this season. I applied to a few schools in the Caribbean last year, but decided not to enroll. I don't mean to sound like I'm bashing the Caribbean; I just know that I personally would be unhappy there, even with the MD at the end. Leukocyte will tell you how hard it is to get a surgical spot coming from the Caribbean. I'm sure it's hard from Ireland too, but I've decided to go to Ireland (assuming I get in :fingerscrossedsmiliethatdoesn'texist: ).
Or perhaps apply to osteopathic schools? (just asking b/c i am applying to osteopathic schools as well)
 
M

Mr. McDuck

No, I actually want to go to Ireland. I have excellent stats and could definitely (probably...never say definitely :p ) get into US allo schools, but I think I may want to live in Ireland one day, and having a degree from there would certainly make it easier to practice there. Of course, with the way things are right now, that's not the most realistic of dreams. But, I want the option to be there.

Keep in touch if you end up applying to Ireland. It'd be nice to be able to talk to someone about the whole process.
 

dirtymac42

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ssa915 said:
Yes I am american, and yes I do plan on practising in the states. It just makes more sense to go to a university that is actually established (like ireland schools, since late 1800's), not just a school that churns out doctors like a factory...

But, maybe residency programs in the US prefer caribbean over Ireland b/c they are more tightly connected in the US... ???
Well, if you want to do surgery, RCSI is def the place to be. This is because, as many of us know, surgery is just essentially fiddling with anatomy. Nowhere, and i mean this in a global context, has anatomy training that will surpass Surgeons. Top notch teaching in group size of maybe 15 by renowned surgeons that have 30+ years of experience (not just 4th year med students).

It's my feeling that having closer connections to the states will help getting residency spots but in the end it comes down to your USMLE scores and your interview. You could probably achieve a similar result if you went to ireland, did some good electives and really chatted up the program directors.*

*(i know, that comment was like dropping a virtual bomb in this forum, apologies in advance)

Good luck.
 

Sage880

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I'd go to Ross over RCSI. But have you considered some of the other Irish medical schools? Maybe consider Trinity or UCD over Ross if you haven't thought of applying to them.
 
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ssa915

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Sage880 said:
I'd go to Ross over RCSI. But have you considered some of the other Irish medical schools? Maybe consider Trinity or UCD over Ross if you haven't thought of applying to them.
Why choose Trinity or UCD over RCSI if you would go to Ross over RCSI?

The reason i'm not going to apply there is b/c I have already spent 3 years post-grad, and dont want to enroll in a med program that is more than 4 years.
 

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FYI : RCSI just started a 4 year graduate entry medical program. According to admissions, the first incoming class starting in October is roughly 50 % north american.

I may be biased (as I'm an RCSI student), but we spend 1.5 years to cover all the anatomy, have oral quizzes every 2 weeks by the surgeon prosectors in front of all our colleagues, and have incredible anatomy teaching staff. I would have to say that when it comes to anatomy, our understanding of the subject far exceeds my Canadian colleagues, most of whom spend about 3 months on anatomy.