Quantcast

Schools that aren't numbers-based

Free Sample Essays
This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

Gabby

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2006
Messages
649
Reaction score
1
My situation is a little different than the average pre-meds. I'm a nontraditional. I graduated college with a GPA of around 2.9 and never took a science course. I spent several years working in my field (non-science) and then returned to school in hopes of going to med school. My post-bacc GPA with 68 credits is a 3.9. I don't know what my overall GPA is because I haven't done the math, but since I had around 150+ credits as an undergrad and only 68 credits as a post-bacc, I'm sure it's very, very low.

I'll be taking the MCAT in May and my practice test scores have been in the upper 20s (28 and 29) and low 30s (33, 31, 31, 30).

I've heard that some schools look at post-bacc GPA more than undergrad GPA for nontraditional applicants who've been out of undergrad for a while and had never taken any med school pre-reqs. My question is, which schools are these? The MSAR doesn't help much because my overall GPA will be lower than all the schools' averages thanks to undergrad, so I'm wondering which schools are the ones that aren't as numbers-oriented and will take into consideration the whole candidate and be a little more forgiving of grades I earned 10+ years ago?

P.S. I'm applying to 15 Osteopathic schools as well since my goal is to become a physician. But on the Allo side, which schools will be more likely to look closely at my last two years of academic work and my extensive professional experience? More closely than the C I earned in freshman year Art History back in 1995, for instance.
 

Depakote

Pediatric Anesthesiologist
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
15+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2004
Messages
20,793
Reaction score
107
My situation is a little different than the average pre-meds. I'm a nontraditional. I graduated college with a GPA of around 2.9 and never took a science course. I spent several years working in my field (non-science) and then returned to school in hopes of going to med school. My post-bacc GPA with 68 credits is a 3.9. I don't know what my overall GPA is because I haven't done the math, but since I had around 150+ credits as an undergrad and only 68 credits as a post-bacc, I'm sure it's very, very low.

I'll be taking the MCAT in May and my practice test scores have been in the upper 20s (28 and 29) and low 30s (33, 31, 31, 30).

I've heard that some schools look at post-bacc GPA more than undergrad GPA for nontraditional applicants who've been out of undergrad for a while and had never taken any med school pre-reqs. My question is, which schools are these? The MSAR doesn't help much because my overall GPA will be lower than all the schools' averages thanks to undergrad, so I'm wondering which schools are the ones that aren't as numbers-oriented and will take into consideration the whole candidate and be a little more forgiving of grades I earned 10+ years ago?

P.S. I'm applying to 15 Osteopathic schools as well since my goal is to become a physician. But on the Allo side, which schools will be more likely to look closely at my last two years of academic work and my extensive professional experience? More closely than the C I earned in freshman year Art History back in 1995, for instance.

My experience is that, in general, DO schools are more open to non-trads with profiles such as yours. Since you're applying to a broad range of DO schools you'll be in good shape there.
 

HumidBeing

In Memory of Riley Jane
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2007
Messages
18,706
Reaction score
7
I don't know about the overall picture for that, but state schools are often the most likely to examine the complete picture and be more lenient about the numbers for their in-state applicants. The better the MCAT score, the better your chance to have them look more closely at you.
 

MDpride

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
May 28, 2007
Messages
680
Reaction score
3
15 is too much.

I regret wasting money on 13 allopathic for primary and 7 for secondary.
Also, 2 DO.

Got only 2 interviews with 30/3.9(postbac)

I should have applied to 3 schools including one DO.

I am non-trad too.
 

SketchLazy

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
May 16, 2007
Messages
772
Reaction score
3
15 is too much.

I regret wasting money on 13 allopathic for primary and 7 for secondary.
Also, 2 DO.

Got only 2 interviews with 30/3.9(postbac)

I should have applied to 3 schools including one DO.

I am non-trad too.

But it's not like you know which schools will grant you an interview and then an acceptance. As long as you know what the secondaries will be like and are sure you can finish them, then you should apply to as many schools as you can afford to (given that you can picture yourself actually going to the school and living in the area). The school you cut out might be the one that would have accepted you.
 

bodonid

Dr. Spaceman
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 18, 2007
Messages
1,885
Reaction score
2
I applied to 6, and if I had to do it over again, I would have applied to 25. It is worth the money, if you don't know what school you want. Being excited about your school is verry important to your grades.

15 is a good #, imo
 

Law2Doc

5K+ Member
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2004
Messages
30,878
Reaction score
10,057
My situation is a little different than the average pre-meds. I'm a nontraditional. I graduated college with a GPA of around 2.9 and never took a science course. I spent several years working in my field (non-science) and then returned to school in hopes of going to med school. My post-bacc GPA with 68 credits is a 3.9. I don't know what my overall GPA is because I haven't done the math, but since I had around 150+ credits as an undergrad and only 68 credits as a post-bacc, I'm sure it's very, very low.

I'll be taking the MCAT in May and my practice test scores have been in the upper 20s (28 and 29) and low 30s (33, 31, 31, 30).

I've heard that some schools look at post-bacc GPA more than undergrad GPA for nontraditional applicants who've been out of undergrad for a while and had never taken any med school pre-reqs. My question is, which schools are these? The MSAR doesn't help much because my overall GPA will be lower than all the schools' averages thanks to undergrad, so I'm wondering which schools are the ones that aren't as numbers-oriented and will take into consideration the whole candidate and be a little more forgiving of grades I earned 10+ years ago?

P.S. I'm applying to 15 Osteopathic schools as well since my goal is to become a physician. But on the Allo side, which schools will be more likely to look closely at my last two years of academic work and my extensive professional experience? More closely than the C I earned in freshman year Art History back in 1995, for instance.

There are no allo schools that are known as not numbers oriented. All care about the numbers. The question for you is whether some may focus more on your BCPM or postbac grades which are reportedly good versus your overall GPA which isn't. Your only hope is to apply widely because you won't know which schools these will be -- nobody on here can tell you. State school is a good start. I would also caution on the MCAT, if you aren't scoring consistently over 30, you need to push it back because in your situation, eg a 28 to go along with your 3.0ish GPA is going to be a deal breaker for allo schools.
 

wizenedone

Indeed...
10+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2008
Messages
524
Reaction score
2
OP - Your first priority should be to do well on the MCAT. Keep raising that uGPA and get other parts of your application (ECs, LORs etc) strong. You'll be fine.
 

TheRealMD

"The Mac Guy"
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
May 24, 2007
Messages
4,769
Reaction score
12
68 credits at a 3.9 is like 2 years of full-blown college coursework. I think that if you mention why your GPA was so low during college, then they may put you into consideration.

It's not strictly a numbers game, though they are very much involved. A lot has to do with the presentation of your application. Your personal statement will be their first glimpse of you. Make sure they leave with a good one.
 

Gabby

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2006
Messages
649
Reaction score
1
Thank you all for your replies.

(1) Yes, it has been two years of full-time coursework.

(2) I will reschedule my MCAT if my practice scores go down (even if it means not showing up and eating the $200 if I miss the deadline to change the date), but my 28 and 29 were my first two tests last month. Since then, it's been 30+. I'm scheduled to take the real thing on May 23 so I'm still hoping to do better by then.

(3) I guess I should have mentioned ECs. I have various non-medical volunteer activities that I've been doing for about 8-10 years. I also have some that I've been doing for the past 3-5 years. I have two years of clinical experience (volunteer) and about 50 hours of shadowing with a DO letter.

(4) I know that DOs are a better fit, but I want to apply both allo and osteo. There are some allo schools that I'd love to attend.

(5) I don't think 15 schools is too much, given my stats. I plan to apply a total of about 20 - 25. Maybe more depending on my MCAT.
 

wizenedone

Indeed...
10+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2008
Messages
524
Reaction score
2
(5) I don't think 15 schools is too much, given my stats. I plan to apply a total of about 20 - 25. Maybe more depending on my MCAT.

Yes, don't worry. Apply broadly and early.
 

highonlyfe5

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2007
Messages
26
Reaction score
0
Might as well apply to as many as possible...you never know what is going to happen.

I had a 3.5, finished the premed coursework and a major in neurobiology in 2 years after spending 2 years at a 2.9 pursuing an accounting major.

With a 3.5, i thought i was sitting pretty, with an MCAT of 35, but i had a C in Zoology 101 while i was doing business, and a C in economics 102 because i just didnt care about doing the work...these two grades killed me. I took one class over (econ 102) and took more advanced biology courses to prove the C was just a fluke...

ECs were ER volunteering 2 years, 2 years in stem cell research with an upcoming published paper, martial arts, school's lacrosse club, neuroscience society member, and leadership positions at Hillel (as a songleader on and off)...

I applied to about 15 schools and only got an interview at 2, Mcgill and Tel Aviv University.

So I was hoping Id be able to get a few more interviews, but instead i got straight out rejected at nearly every school I had applied to, even after a dean of admissions at one school told me my application looked good.


moral of the story is :

Med school admissions is a crapshoot for most applicants. Apply to many where your stats or your story fits the bill. Schools will see the non-traditional student as more mature, so just have a good motivation/reason for medicine.
 

ihatescience

Full Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2006
Messages
323
Reaction score
0
Might as well apply to as many as possible...you never know what is going to happen.

I had a 3.5, finished the premed coursework and a major in neurobiology in 2 years after spending 2 years at a 2.9 pursuing an accounting major.

With a 3.5, i thought i was sitting pretty, with an MCAT of 35, but i had a C in Zoology 101 while i was doing business, and a C in economics 102 because i just didnt care about doing the work...these two grades killed me. I took one class over (econ 102) and took more advanced biology courses to prove the C was just a fluke...

ECs were ER volunteering 2 years, 2 years in stem cell research with an upcoming published paper, martial arts, school's lacrosse club, neuroscience society member, and leadership positions at Hillel (as a songleader on and off)...

I applied to about 15 schools and only got an interview at 2, Mcgill and Tel Aviv University.

So I was hoping Id be able to get a few more interviews, but instead i got straight out rejected at nearly every school I had applied to, even after a dean of admissions at one school told me my application looked good.


moral of the story is :

Med school admissions is a crapshoot for most applicants. Apply to many where your stats or your story fits the bill. Schools will see the non-traditional student as more mature, so just have a good motivation/reason for medicine.

Good points!
 
Top