SGU or Ross?

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dsk89

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I've already looked over a bunch of forums of this, but none that are very recent. And I don't mean to compare the schools in terms of which is better "academically" or whatever, but I was just a little more concerned about Ross's past(?) problems with clinicals, and accepting too many students and not having enough clinical spots for all of them, not having all ACGME approved rotations, and some rotations not having enough spots and students having to delay graduation. I'm wondering whether such problems still exist at Ross or whether it has been fixed. I have already been accepted at Ross, and I have an upcoming interview at St. George, so I feel like my decision should be based off of which school would potentially present fewer internal hurdles if I ended up in the Caribbean. My situation with US schools is still pending, as I am waiting for decisions, but I'd like to have the better option btween SGU and Ross as a backup in case. Thanks for your input!

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I've already looked over a bunch of forums of this, but none that are very recent. And I don't mean to compare the schools in terms of which is better "academically" or whatever, but I was just a little more concerned about Ross's past(?) problems with clinicals, and accepting too many students and not having enough clinical spots for all of them, not having all ACGME approved rotations, and some rotations not having enough spots and students having to delay graduation. I'm wondering whether such problems still exist at Ross or whether it has been fixed. I have already been accepted at Ross, and I have an upcoming interview at St. George, so I feel like my decision should be based off of which school would potentially present fewer internal hurdles if I ended up in the Caribbean. My situation with US schools is still pending, as I am waiting for decisions, but I'd like to have the better option btween SGU and Ross as a backup in case. Thanks for your input!

I would just say SGU just because i've heard better things about it. It seems like the most legitimate Caribbean school. Ross would be in 2nd though so don't sweat it.
 
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I honestly would not go to the carribbean if i were you guys. let's face it, if you cant get into an american MD or DO school, than maybe your just not cut out for this profession. Don't feel bad, most people aren't but you really are risking a lot of time and money going this route. Your parents money and livelihood is on the line since the parent plus loans are going to fall on your parents. With Interest, your going to owe a huge amount of money. You may not make it all the way through the 4 years or you may not pass the boards and may not score well enough to get a residency. More american medical schools are opening up, which will fill the extra available residencies over the next couple of years. Less residencies are going to be available to you and chances are if you succeed all the way through than you will end up in primary care and not make much return for the input. I know mechanics that make as much as family docs, honestly these are for profit schools capitalizing on students who couldn't get in. Your going to be competing with people abroad from areas like china and india who are very intelligent and will likely score well on the boards since their well known to have rigorous academic standards in these countries.
 
I honestly would not go to the carribbean if i were you guys. let's face it, if you cant get into an american MD or DO school, than maybe your just not cut out for this profession. Don't feel bad, most people aren't but you really are risking a lot of time and money going this route. Your parents money and livelihood is on the line since the parent plus loans are going to fall on your parents. With Interest, your going to owe a huge amount of money. You may not make it all the way through the 4 years or you may not pass the boards and may not score well enough to get a residency. More american medical schools are opening up, which will fill the extra available residencies over the next couple of years. Less residencies are going to be available to you and chances are if you succeed all the way through than you will end up in primary care and not make much return for the input. I know mechanics that make as much as family docs, honestly these are for profit schools capitalizing on students who couldn't get in. Your going to be competing with people abroad from areas like china and india who are very intelligent and will likely score well on the boards since their well known to have rigorous academic standards in these countries.

You're not totally wrong. The Caribbean is by no means a guarantee to becoming a practicing doc in the states. I would say though that Caribbean grads (in the big 4 or so) will at least have their curricula tailored towards passing the USMLE, so that's working for them. Also, if they are aware of the risks, then it's their life and therefore their choice. I go to school in Chicago, and I've met at least a dozen Caribbean grads in a handful of hospitals and all of them are making $$$ in their respective careers, and each one of them (so far as I could tell) is more than competent. Granted, these people are competent because they made it through the big weeding-out process that is Caribbean medical school. At the end of the day, if you want to be a physician and are willing to work for it, the Caribbean is still an option. Whether that will still be the case in ten years is anyone's guess, but for now, we still have a physician shortage, especially in primary care, and if people can pass the boards and get through a US residency, I'd be glad to work with them.
 
BUT I still say exhaust all other options before heading offshore. If you're good enough for the big 4, then you're good enough to try an SMP for a year. An SMP is a far more conservative option then flying off to the islands.
 
BUT I still say exhaust all other options before heading offshore. If you're good enough for the big 4, then you're good enough to try an SMP for a year. An SMP is a far more conservative option then flying off to the islands.

Thats what im saying some will in fact make it and become excellent doctors, but that's the exception and not the rule.
 
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