Should I do a second residency in anesthesiology?

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DaTruMD

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Hello everyone,

Please excuse this perhaps naive question but I would like your input. I am currently in my mid 30s and single and have been out of residency for 3-4 years. I am considering doing a second residency in anesthesiology because when I was in medical school, my institution didn't have an anesthesiology department and I couldn't do a rotation in it. I also found out about the specialty too late. However, I have hung out with a few anesthesiologists in the hospital setting and see that I could enjoy the work for my career. I also enjoy the immediacy and physiology of the specialty vs chronic management that I am doing right now.

I know money isn't everything but I am trying to take everything into consideration. I currently make high 400s/low 500s working 16 days per month as a locums in a primary care specialty. Would you advise someone like me to try to do a second residency in anesthesiology?

Thank you for your advice in advance.

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What exactly is your 1st residency in? Does it make more sense to do a fellowship? Why anesthesia? U can do acute care stuff without an anesthesiology residency. Doing 3 years anesthesia residency is basically missing out in 1M$ plus of income.
 
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What exactly is your 1st residency in? Does it make more sense to do a fellowship? Why anesthesia? U can do acute care stuff without an anesthesiology residency. Doing 3 years anesthesia residency is basically missing out in 1M$ plus of income.
I did IM. I don't like any of the IM fellowships...
 
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I did IM. I don't like any of the IM fellowships...

So u are wanting to do OR stuff? Maybe best to shadow a bit first before making a big commitment. 99% of the time it isn't that interesting and everyone thinks they know more about anesthesia than the anesthesiologist.
 
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I know money isn't everything but I am trying to take everything into consideration. I currently make high 400s/low 500s working 16 days per month as a locums in a primary care specialty. Would you advise someone like me to try to do a second residency in anesthesiology?

Thank you for your advice in adadvance.n
You're crazy, don't do it...
All work is only work after about 3 or 4 years...
Go have a family or develop an addiction to whisky like most normal people
 
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Hello everyone,

Please excuse this perhaps naive question but I would like your input. I am currently in my mid 30s and single and have been out of residency for 3-4 years. I am considering doing a second residency in anesthesiology because when I was in medical school, my institution didn't have an anesthesiology department and I couldn't do a rotation in it. I also found out about the specialty too late. However, I have hung out with a few anesthesiologists in the hospital setting and see that I could enjoy the work for my career. I also enjoy the immediacy and physiology of the specialty vs chronic management that I am doing right now.

I know money isn't everything but I am trying to take everything into consideration. I currently make high 400s/low 500s working 16 days per month as a locums in a primary care specialty. Would you advise someone like me to try to do a second residency in anesthesiology?

Thank you for your advice in advance.

That’s more than I make.
Are you willing to forgo ~1.5 M?
It’s very different when you’re an attending and coming back for a residency.

But I shouldn’t be the one to talk, since I did the same exact thing. However, that was close to 10 years ago, when 250K is considered a very good salary.

Good luck, you won’t be the first one to consider doing this…….
 
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That’s more than I make.
Are you willing to forgo ~1.5 M?
It’s very different when you’re an attending and coming back for a residency.

But I shouldn’t be the one to talk, since I did the same exact thing. However, that was close to 10 years ago, when 250K is considered a very good salary.

Good luck, you won’t be the first one to consider doing this…….
It’s all relative primary care w2 non locums salaries were 160k in 2010-2012. Anesthesia w2 salaries due to major buyouts were in the 250-280k range full time with 50 hours and 6 weeks paid vacation.

Primary care salaries w2 are now 220-250k. So locums primary care 400-450k range sounds right in 2023 assuming 8 weeks off.


Anesthesia w2 is 450k (before overtime/incentive). Locums anesthesia is around 600-700k full time locums. Assuming 9-10 weeks off

So percentage wise it’s the same
 
It’s all relative primary care w2 non locums salaries were 160k in 2010-2012. Anesthesia w2 salaries due to major buyouts were in the 250-280k range full time with 50 hours and 6 weeks paid vacation.

Primary care salaries w2 are now 220-250k. So locums primary care 400-450k range sounds right in 2023 assuming 8 weeks off.


Anesthesia w2 is 450k (before overtime/incentive). Locums anesthesia is around 600-700k full time locums. Assuming 9-10 weeks off

So percentage wise it’s the same

Depends how long his days are. If he’s working 8 hours days, he’s making the same as a locums anesthesiologist. If he’s working 12 hour days then he’s making a good bit less. There’s also the very real possibility that the anesthesia locums market cools significantly in 3-4 years by the time he finishes residency. These big systems are training CRNAs by the bucketload right now.

I wouldn’t do another residency. Save money, find a niche in IM that suits you, and look for happiness outside of work. It’s just a job and a way to pay bills. Chasing down some ideal specialty by doing multiple residencies is expensive and time consuming.
 
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I had a few attendings who did IM residency and decided to pursue a second residency in anesthesia. They ended up doing a fellowship or double fellowship in ICU/Cardiac. Some of them did peds and PICU and then decided to pursue anesthesia. Most of them had family/kids and if this is what you truly want, I say go for it. Some of my co-residents spent 3-5 years in gen surg/neurosurg before switching out. You will have to make a financial sacrifice but you can always moonlight, so you make up some lost income. I would say shadow a few different anesthesiologists in different setting and see if that’s what you truly want. Good thing is the anesthesia residency will be only 3 years for you and ICU rotations will be easier for you. My PD liked applicants with unique experience, so it may help you out if you can present a good application package. Ultimately, do what makes you happy.
 
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Strong no from me. Even if you think you would have liked anesthesiology more, I doubt you'd like it that much more to be worth $1.5 million more. As somebody else said, every job loses a bit of its luster and becomes more or less of a job after a while. Unspecialized IM is an impressive field and it sounds like you make good money. Maybe you can find some hospitalist work that involves you providing care that is a bit more acute than what you're currently doing?
 
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The only good reason to switch is if you really dislike doing any form of general IM work.
 
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That’s more than I make.
Are you willing to forgo ~1.5 M?
It’s very different when you’re an attending and coming back for a residency.

But I shouldn’t be the one to talk, since I did the same exact thing. However, that was close to 10 years ago, when 250K is considered a very good salary.

Good luck, you won’t be the first one to consider doing this…….

Thank you for your reply. How long were you a IM attending for before you decided to go back to residency? Would you do it again?

Also, thank you everyone else that has given their input so far. I appreciate it.
 
Depends how long his days are. If he’s working 8 hours days, he’s making the same as a locums anesthesiologist. If he’s working 12 hour days then he’s making a good bit less. There’s also the very real possibility that the anesthesia locums market cools significantly in 3-4 years by the time he finishes residency. These big systems are training CRNAs by the bucketload right now.

I wouldn’t do another residency. Save money, find a niche in IM that suits you, and look for happiness outside of work. It’s just a job and a way to pay bills. Chasing down some ideal specialty by doing multiple residencies is expensive and time consuming.
Has the number of training programs for anesthesia assistants, CRNAs, and MD anesthesiology residency increased significantly in the recent years? If that's the case, I guess the high demand that is seen right now may be met in the future in a few years.
 
So if this is genuine interest that would be one thing. It would make 0 financial sense and set you behind since you are doing great already $$ wise. Unless you happen to snag a gas babe in the process :cigar:
 
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Or a cute medical student
might be a stretch given 10 year age gap. But $$ which the poster has suddenly makes it all moot. CRNA/NP/Med students/Residents/Attendings that could be a 2 for 1 reason to enter the jungle for 3 years.
 
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might be a stretch given 10 year age gap. But $$ which the poster has suddenly makes it all moot. CRNA/NP/Med students/Residents/Attendings that could be a 2 for 1 reason to enter the jungle for 3 years.

That's true, I don't want to be a dating a 30 year old when I'm 40. Leonardo di Caprio knows how it's done
 
Thank you for your reply. How long were you a IM attending for before you decided to go back to residency? Would you do it again?

Also, thank you everyone else that has given their input so far. I appreciate it.

3 years.
Probably. I am generally happier than rounding daily. That being said, once in a while I do miss that “deeper connection” I have with patients.

Moreover, I think I am better at the come to Jesus talk than some of my partners. I am also a little more liberal to let some things slide than some others, because I know how hard it is for some of them to finally get the surgery/procedural that they need. However, I certainly don’t miss get the patient through the system, writing progress notes, dictating discharge summaries, and talk to unreasonable family members. That’s when I snap back and am glad I am doing anesthesia.

Different stress though. Grass isn’t always greener on the other side.
 
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