Rain Rabbit

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Hi,

Does anyone know of any good SMPs with high linkage? Also which is better SMP or postbacc? Any help is appreciated :)
 
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Dr Lyss

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Georgetown SMP is the first one that comes to mind. I believe if you go on AAMC there is a section to look up postgrad programs. Whether you need a postbac or a SMP will depend on your situation. If you have a low gpa then consider a postbac. If your MCAT is weak consider an SMP.
 
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Rain Rabbit

Rain Rabbit

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so a SMP is not for people who have a below average gpa (<3.4) and a high mcat (>37)?
 

genswim24

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so a SMP is not for people who have a below average gpa (<3.4) and a high mcat (>37)?
No, an SMP is designed for people with low grades (usually 3.0-3.4) and a high MCAT. I just finished one, and that was what made up a majority of my class.

An SMP rarely makes up for a bad MCAT, so if that is your weakness, an SMP is not a great way to improve your chances.
 

213965

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Rain Rabbit, an SMP is exactly for people with high MCAT's and below avg GPA's (lower than 3.4).

NOT for people like me with low MCAT's and higher GPA's (>3.5). I am currently enrolled in one this year and it's hurting my GPA since I came into it close to a 3.8, and it's nearly impossible for me to meet that same standard in my SMP.

SMP or post-bacc in large part depends on whether you're applying MD or DO. DO schools replace your old grades with the new ones, so in that case I think post-bacc would be more beneficial. For MD schools I think SMP looks better, but not doing well could tank your application. Expect to attend class full-time and study 6+ hours/day afterwards. In an SMP you are expected to perform BETTER than the medschool students or you will end up with a 3.0 avg (B) or even a C (I got one during my first quarter). You will have no life for 9 months, but if a low GPA is your main deficiency, it's a good way to prove to medschools that you can handle the difficult courseload.
 
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Rain Rabbit

Rain Rabbit

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i had a horrible first two years of college (soph and fresh year combined was a ~2.4) due mainly to poor study habits and starting up an organization from the ground up which kill a lot of my time (poor time management).
starting junior year, after trying, i have gotten straight 4.0s and i am about to graduate in the spring (this semester looks to be a solid 4.0 as well). I have overloaded like crazy the past year and retook some courses i did poorly in. despite my efforts, i calculated out my aamc cgpa to be about a 3.33 when i graduate with a 3.3 sgpa :(

Now I haven't taken the MCAT yet, but i am an awesome standardized test taker... once I set my mind to it, i know i can do well. My first diagnostic was a 30 this past spring. I have been studying every chance I get while NOT studying for my classes (usually 7-8 hours a week). Anyways since then, my practice exam scores have increased and I have been able to get in the 35-39 range consistently (taken all the aamc practice tests). I still have until this upcoming spring till the real thing but I am confident I will score at least a 36 by that time (I know...very presumptive of me)

ECs are the regular stuff besides starting up the organization... boat loads of volunteer (clinical, community), very slim research... excellent LORS

now that you know my situation, with my low gpa but (STRONG UPWARD TREND. first two years ~2.4 last two years ~projected 4.0) and potential high MCAT, what do you think my chances are at lower tier MD schools?

i know if I apply to DO i will have a higher chance of getting in because of the grade forgiveness (my gpa will be a ~3.7)

any advice is appreciated :)
 
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Rain Rabbit

Rain Rabbit

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i forgot to mention that i worked 20 hours a week my first two years and since junior year, i have worked two jobs that make up a combined total of ~30 hours a week to support myself through college.
 

alibai3ah

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Rain Rabbit, if you are able to get a 35+ score on the MCATs, I think you should apply to MD programs anyways despite the 3.3 gpa. Sure the 3.3 gpa is a bit low, but I think an SMP program could hurt you alot more than it can help you (if suppose you don't do as well). PLus they are very costly.....so if you do in fact get a high MCAT, just apply broadly
 

genswim24

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Rain Rabbit, if you are able to get a 35+ score on the MCATs, I think you should apply to MD programs anyways despite the 3.3 gpa. Sure the 3.3 gpa is a bit low, but I think an SMP program could hurt you alot more than it can help you (if suppose you don't do as well). PLus they are very costly.....so if you do in fact get a high MCAT, just apply broadly

I agree, if you can get that 35+ on the MCAT I would give your state school(s) and mid range private schools a shot. This is especially true if you have a strong upward trend as you suggest.
 
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Rain Rabbit

Rain Rabbit

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thanks for the advice, keep them coming.
 
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Rain Rabbit

Rain Rabbit

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my ecs include: as i mentioned previously was founding an organization that has a large positive impact at my school (part of the reason for my poor early gpa) and the community (and no, it is not a club). Besides that i am also on an director for a major student org at my campus. part of several clubs, etc... volunteer a ton at the hospital and to the community. i also tutor students on campus (paid by the school) in the sciences

in addition, i have been working full time basically throughout my entire college career

MY LORS are strong, a few of the professors whom i was going to ask for a recommendation came to me offering to write a recommendation for me if i needed one.

edit: my research is slim however... i did do a poster presentation and coauthored a paper that is suppose to be out in the spring
 
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Rain Rabbit

Rain Rabbit

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Coauthoring a paper and presenting a poster is a lot more then a lot of students who do research will ever accomplish in ugrad. So yeah its no Goldwater scholar or Rhodes Scholar but it is significant. Your ECs sound good.

With a 35+ if you apply reasonably to a broad base of schools, a few reach schools, your state schools, and other schools that take a lot of out of state students and people with a broad range of stats, you will most likely get a good chance of getting in somewhere.

If you don't then SMP programs will be your best option, esp. going to a program that is more well known like BU MAMS, Drexel IMS, or the founding and best known of its type the Gtown SMP but chances are you might not need it. So do make an appt with admissions directors of your state schools and a few others of schools of interest.
what do you mean by this? just call them to request an appointment to go over my competitiveness:confused:?
 
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Rain Rabbit

Rain Rabbit

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thanks for all the help!, i sent you a PM.