Medicfletch

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Over the past week I have now encountered 3 seperate people who stopped taking all their cardiac, diabetic and other essential medications and of course became symptomatic as a result. When I asked why they did this, all three told me that they were advised by their lawyers to stop taking the pills. So my question: when did a JD entitle you to practice medicine. I must be going the wrong route, why go to medical school to practice medicine when I could easily get into law school :D . Oh well. Anyone else still working in the field or in the ER's come across similar instances?
 

NREMTP

Is Chillin
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no i haven't, but i will definately be on the lookout for this. this is very interesting and very sad at the same time too. firggin lawyers, there they go again thinkin they know EVERYTHING.

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DocWagner

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There is no lawyer on the planet that has an ounce of intelligence that would do that. Likely, very very likely the patients are simply confused...probably from not taking their meds.
 
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Medicfletch

Medicfletch

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Well one patient in particular, when she was shown to the waiting room, screened by the ER physician and told she would have to pay $200 dollars to be seen, promptly called her lawyer/medical adviser who then demanded to speak to the charge nurse at this facility. Needless to say this got the pt no where (as it should) and she became irrate towards the security guard who was then kind enough to be escorted off property. So at least they don't have admitting privaleges.... ;)