Some clarification

Discussion in 'Clinicians [ RN / NP / PA ]' started by UMDeeMan, May 6, 2004.

  1. UMDeeMan

    UMDeeMan Senior Member
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    Ok, here's the deal, i've been looking at the schooling for becoming a PA. I've come across some confusing information. Is it an undergraduate degree or is it a post-grad degree?? if there are both, which one is better? also, what is the "normal" path people take to become a PA? from what i've seen, 2,000 hours of direct patient interaction is a must to be an applicant. someone please fill me in and don't refer me to a website with something to read. I want human answers here.
     
  2. sweetcalie08

    sweetcalie08 Senior Member
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    UMDeeMan, which careers are you considering still? Dentistry, pharmacy, and PA? Good luck with your decision! I know it took me forever to finally narrow it down!
     
  3. UMDeeMan

    UMDeeMan Senior Member
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    not sure, no pharmacy for sure, that was a phase. dental gets slimmer everyday though, and the more i look into my original plan (physical therapy) the more i like the idea of sticking to where I started. i like the idea of getting in theory a doctorate in PT and a masters in PA. plus from an economic standpoint, the schooling would be much cheaper and the salaries are fine (what is it 60k for a PA? 45k for PT?). plus a friend of the family is an orthopedic surgeon (tried to get me to go for med school) and he wants me to be able to assist him. don't know, but I'm leaning towards PT, cause then I can have time to do some internships with a couple sports teams. PM me.
     
  4. wickliffe2

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    PA programs vary. There are bachelors and master's programs, but the trend is moving towards all of them being masters. If you already have your bachelor's, then you should obviously apply to a master's program. Some programs, like the one I'm in, allow you to complete your bachelor's and master's in 5 years total. You are correct about the amount of clinical hours, but it varies depending on the program. Bachelors programs generally do not require clinical hours to start with. I know you said not to refer you to a website, but there is a forum just like this one for only PA's at www.physicianassociate.com where people are very helpful. Hope this helps!
     
  5. jdpharmd?

    jdpharmd? Turning lead into gold
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    I really hope that PT salaries are higher than that. I think that a large component of the D-PT is geared towards "thinning the heard" a little bit. PTs used to be in huge demand, but there are essentially "too many" for their own good right now. PAs, Pharms, and ODs are usually competitive with PTs on an academic level, but PTs make half the cash. Hopefully we'll see some cash for D-PTs soon. :thumbup:
     
  6. UMDeeMan

    UMDeeMan Senior Member
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    I attribute the low salaries of PT's due to the advancement and boom of PTA's. A PT is evolving into more of a manager or supervisor of PTA's. My econ teacher in my senior year of high preached to myself and all my classmates that technical and community colleges were going to be the wave of the future, for decent paying jobs (35-50k range). With the emergence of nurses, pta's, dental assistants, i can't help but think this has a negative effect in regard to salaries of pt's and dentists. dentists are alright because they control their market and physicians are ok cause a doctor is a doctor, enough said. but where is the Physical therapist in this mix? that's one doubt i have about the field and kinda why i sorta agree with pharmtech77. PA's i see only becoming more important with the extra work load physicians will be taking on with the baby boomer generation. and legislation seems to keep coming expanding the realms where PA's can mingle freely (well somewhat freely). this is what has turned me on to the PA career.
     
  7. CanuckPAGirl

    CanuckPAGirl That girl needs therapy
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    Honestly it's all over over the place.
    I had 30 hours of clinical experience as an Aide on an ambulance, I was accepted into Bachelors program. Granted 30 hours is VERY rare, but still, its out there.

    Some are fiercely competitive and very directed at those with prior medical experience. Some are more directed at a fresh crop, and want to mold them specifically I guess.


    Seems theres room in PA school for many different types of applicants.

    Good luck making a decision :)
     
  8. JustaPA

    JustaPA Member
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    UMDEEMan,

    You might very well get in the program you want with no problem. Masters/B.S./A.S./certificate programs. In California two schools that you would think would offer the most, offer the least, Stanford and UC Davis (not named after our former Governor) offer only certificate programs, but this still gets you the ability to take the boards. My point is what do you want, the degree or the job? I would suggest that you apply to all the schools that interest you and hope to get into one of them. If you are accepted by all or more than one take your pick and go for it.
     

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