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sound waves in pipe

Discussion in 'MCAT Study Question Q&A' started by chiddler, Feb 15, 2012.

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  1. chiddler

    chiddler 5+ Year Member

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    Apr 6, 2010
    The representation of sound vibration in pipes is usually this:

    [​IMG]

    since sound is made of longitudinal waves, what does the sinusoidal wave represent?
     
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  3. chiddler

    chiddler 5+ Year Member

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    Apr 6, 2010
  4. SaintJude

    SaintJude

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    Jan 4, 2012
    Your book should have indicated that's this is indeed not an accurate representation of the sound waves (and changes in amplitude like you just indicated) But you're right! In truth, the top picture should be really shown.

    This sinusoidal waves are just drawn for learning purpose--to visually see how many wavelengths fit in the tube.
     
  5. chiddler

    chiddler 5+ Year Member

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    no wait. y axis is not right.
     
  6. milski

    milski 1K member 5+ Year Member

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    Where the rain grows
    Yes, pretty much ΔP.
     
  7. chiddler

    chiddler 5+ Year Member

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    Apr 6, 2010
    oh

    thanks for the help.
     
  8. MrNeuro

    MrNeuro 5+ Year Member

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    Danger Zone
    its graphed as a sinusodal wave as the longitudinal wave creates regions of compression and rarefaction. Regions of compression are crests and regions of rarefaction are troughs.

    [​IMG]

    i guess they got to it first
     
  9. chiddler

    chiddler 5+ Year Member

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    you're wrong. I got to it first ;D

    question: why do closed ends of pipes have to contain a node? why do open ends have to contain antinodes?

    book says: there is always a displacement node at the closed end (because the air is not free to move) and an antinode at the open end (where the air can freely move.)

    if air cannot move shouldn't it be a rarefaction?

    NO WAIT a rarefaction indicates air movement. The only one that doesn't indicate air movement is node.

    i'm on a roll!
     
  10. MrNeuro

    MrNeuro 5+ Year Member

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    Danger Zone
    thanks for the explanation i was a little stumped by that one. :cool:
     
  11. silverice

    silverice 5+ Year Member

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    May 1, 2010
    Can you please explain a little more, I'm super confused on this concept.
     

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