DownonthePharm

Chillin' n Fillin'
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Dec 23, 2004
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Oklahoma
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Depending on which part of the country it varies from marginally useful to extreamly extreamly useful. For example, there are parts of Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas where they dont even play English over the speakers in the stores.

I really wish had learned spanish.
 
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pdydy

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Jul 26, 2006
8
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California (socal)
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DownonthePharm said:
Depending on which part of the country it varies from marginally useful to extreamly extreamly useful. For example, there are parts of Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas where they dont even play English over the speakers in the stores.

I really wish had learned spanish.
I live in California, so i think it will be useful. but how about in the hospital settings? is spanish useful for a pharmacist?

the reason i'm asking this is because i'm writing my personal statement on how my spanish is a great asset. But I'm not sure how useful it could be...

thanks
 
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kwizard

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jan 6, 2006
197
1
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Attending Physician
pdydy said:
I live in California, so i think it will be useful. but how about in the hospital settings? is spanish useful for a pharmacist?

the reason i'm asking this is because i'm writing my personal statement on how my spanish is a great asset. But I'm not sure how useful it could be...

thanks

Even in hospitals the ability to speak spanish is a big plus. Like the previous post mentioned, it may depend a little on where you work. The latin population is continuing to grow and even in a hospital setting pts often come into the ER and/or are admitted to the floor and are unable to speak English. Therefore that individual who is bilingual is quite helpful when it comes to conveying medical information to the family and/or patient. So helpful that in some regions they have intepreters on call throughout the day.
 
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pdydy

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Jul 26, 2006
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California (socal)
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thx kwisard.

that was helpful. :thumbup: but do pharmacist have a lot of direct relationship with patients? i think they do, but at the hospital that i volunteer, most of them stay at the pharmacy and just wait~ for someone to call them... or does it depend on the type of pharmacist?
 

kwizard

Senior Member
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5+ Year Member
Jan 6, 2006
197
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Attending Physician
pdydy said:
thx kwisard.

that was helpful. :thumbup: but do pharmacist have a lot of direct relationship with patients? i think they do, but at the hospital that i volunteer, most of them stay at the pharmacy and just wait~ for someone to call them... or does it depend on the type of pharmacist?
Yes, it depends on the pharmacist and the pharmacy. Most hospitals are trying to or already have transitioned to a system where all of the pharmacists are on the floor/units processing orders (i.e. decentralized) vs all staying in the central location of the pharmacy. In the decentralized mode only 1 or 2 pharmacists stay in the central pharmacy in order to check meds and answer general questions. Typically if you work on a regular basis and the nurses/physicians find you helpful they will start asking for you by name when they call to the pharmacy (even in cases where all of the pharmacists are located in one central location). In the end a lot of pharmacy is what you make of it so if they (i.e. other staff) view you as a credible source then you will have more oppurtunities to illustrate your capabilities. Also, depending on the hospital, pharmacists may do med reconciliation (clarifying meds taken at home) for new admits and/or also may run the anticoag clinics. In either of these two cases pt contact would be a much more common instance so your capacity to speak more than one language would be even more appreciated.
 
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pdydy

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Jul 26, 2006
8
0
California (socal)
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Yes, it depends on the pharmacist and the pharmacy. Most hospitals are trying to or already have transitioned to a system where all of the pharmacists are on the floor/units processing orders (i.e. decentralized) vs all staying in the central location of the pharmacy. In the decentralized mode only 1 or 2 pharmacists stay in the central pharmacy in order to check meds and answer general questions. Typically if you work on a regular basis and the nurses/physicians find you helpful they will start asking for you by name when they call to the pharmacy (even in cases where all of the pharmacists are located in one central location). In the end a lot of pharmacy is what you make of it so if they (i.e. other staff) view you as a credible source then you will have more oppurtunities to illustrate your capabilities. Also, depending on the hospital, pharmacists may do med reconciliation (clarifying meds taken at home) for new admits and/or also may run the anticoag clinics. In either of these two cases pt contact would be a much more common instance so your capacity to speak more than one language would be even more appreciated.
Wow... that was super helpful. thanks a lot man.
 
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