Starting to freak out about starting internship

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by 73BARMYPgsp, Jun 5, 2008.

  1. 73BARMYPgsp

    73BARMYPgsp Post Doc
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    I know this is pretty normal, so mostly I am just wanting to vent. I am terrified that when I show up for my first day of internship they will discover that in the previous 4 years I will have learned no more about psychology than I could have by watching 4 years of Dr. Phil. That's all.
     
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  2. PSYDR

    PSYDR Psychologist
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    that's not how internship works, really.

    it works more like this:

    you: "hey boss, that lecture was incredible!"
    boss: "where are your reports?"
    you: "well, i was in that lecture untill just now so i haven't had time to finish them since the last time we talked 2 hours ago"
    boss: "great, have them on my desk at 8AM"
    you: "but it's 7PM..."
     
  3. Psycycle

    Psycycle Psychologist, ABPP
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    really? I had been entertaining thoughts of internship year being a blissful relief after grad school. Ok, maybe not a blissful relief, but not nearly as stressful.

    This sounds like it's just as stressful :(
     
  4. Markp

    Markp Clinical Psychologist
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    From the other interns I talked to, they think that internship is somewhat stressful...

    Mark
     
  5. PSYDR

    PSYDR Psychologist
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    it is not stress in the same way grad school is stressful. You will not be drilled about academic stuff (e.g., no supervisor is going to ask you to describe the differences between parataxic and syntaxic distortions).

    but there is stress, related to work load and expectations of the quality of work product.
     
  6. Cosmo75

    Cosmo75 Post-Doctoral Fellow
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    My internship starts 7/1, so I'm being as lazy as possible this month :D Haven't had the freak out yet. I'm trying to maintain denial as long as possible.
     
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  7. Ollie123

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    From what I hear it depends a great deal on where you do your internship.

    Though as I've mentioned elsewhere, I'm sure it also boils down to what you personally consider stressful. I'm expecting to be completely out of my mind for that entire year since I can't stand clinical work whereas I find grad school pretty busy, but not really stressful. In contrast, I know some folks who ended up liking clinical work more than research who were SO much happier on internship than they were in grad school.
     
    #7 Ollie123, Jun 5, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2008
  8. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty
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    I've heard it varies greatly. I have had some friends who worked at VA's and they didn't bring any work home (or on the rare occasion), while other friends have had a ton of work and worked far more hours than the stated hours. The settings vary so much, that you really need to depend on the feedback from the previous interns.

    Good luck!
     
  9. Cosmo75

    Cosmo75 Post-Doctoral Fellow
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    That's a great point. My internship is at a VA and the hours are 8-4:30, and from what I've been told they kick your butt out at 4:30 if you're still there. And at least at this VA, it's against policy to take any clinical work home. The VA is also pretty sweet with time off - 13 vacation, 13 sick, 10 federal holidays. After interviewing at several VA's with similar stories, when I went to sites that were 60+ hours and I had to carry a pager it was incredibly unappealing. And the interns just looked tired. I guess because I've been there done that in terms of working long hours in my previous corporate life, I take the whole concept of work-life balance very seriously now.
     
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  10. biogirl215

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    Or: "By 'work from 8:30 to 5,' we really meant 'work from 7:30 to 7.' Oh, and don't expect to sleep." ;)
     
  11. Jon Snow

    Jon Snow Senior Member
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    I generally worked 7 - 7, but that wasn't really much different than graduate school. My internship site was considered a high workload experience. I enjoyed it.
     
  12. erg923

    erg923 Regional Clinical Officer, Cenpatico National
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    The VA sounds like the place for me.....:laugh:
     
  13. LeeS

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    Sorry what does VA stand for?
    Posted via Mobile Device
     
  14. Ollie123

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    Veterans Affairs. In this case referring to any of the many hospitals operated/funded by the VA system.
     
  15. PSYDR

    PSYDR Psychologist
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    oh, the other one is managing your sick + vacation time while finding a post doc.


    one of my fellow interns used all her time for a vacation and had considerable difficulty finding a post doc as a result.

    just another pitfall i wished someon had told me about
     
  16. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty
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    They are a large source of internship spots and training. Typically good hours, benefits, and lifestyle. Training may vary, but from those I know who work at VA's and/or trained at them...they seem pretty happy.
     
  17. moonflwr

    moonflwr Former Cincinnatian
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    Okay so I should probably already know this but I don't.

    I know you do an internship and I've heard people mention post doc, but what is it? Does everyone do a post doc? Is it like another internship or what?
     
  18. PSYDR

    PSYDR Psychologist
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    internship is a required part of the degree.

    you go classes for 4-5 years
    then 1 year of internship

    then you get your phd or psyd depending on your program


    however, you can't jsut see patients once you get your doctorate. the state you are living in requires a license for the practice of psychology. To get a license you have to be supervised by someone for 1-2 years. This is called the post doc year(s). So you have another hoop to jump through and find someone who will supervise you in your area (geographical or speciality). there are informal ones that are more like a supervised job and formal ones that are more like an internship with structured learning. Some specialties require the latter (e.g., neuro). so then you complete your post doc, take the national test called the Examination for the Practice of Professional Psychology (EPPP for the cool kids), and maybe take oral exams from your state. then you are licensed and can see patients independently.
     
    #18 PSYDR, Jun 6, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2008
  19. PSYDR

    PSYDR Psychologist
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    oh,

    and if you decide to move to another state after you get your license:

    some states will accept licenses from other states (this is called "reciprocity")

    some will require you to seek supervision again

    some will just require a test, usually about the state laws
     
  20. moonflwr

    moonflwr Former Cincinnatian
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    Good lord. (gulp) Can't wait. :oops:

    Thanks!
     
  21. psychwanabe

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    As someone finishing the first year of grad school, I am fascinated by the realization that you fourth-year students are nervous about internship just as I was nervous about grad school a year ago. I guess we'll all be just as nervous for post-doc and our first "real" jobs too. When do we ever start to feel confident that we really know what we are doing? :eek:

    Unless the laws change in the next few years to count practicum hours for post-doc! *crosses fingers*
     
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  22. psychanon

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    Just to clarify, it's almost impossible to get through in 3 years, unless you come in with a masters AND your program accepts a lot of your credits & transfers your thesis. I would say that 4-6+ is more accurate, and 5 is the most common at research-oriented Ph.D. programs. I just finished my 4th year now, and no one in class applied for internship this year. Just want to make sure that people have an accurate impression how freakin' long this takes.
     
  23. PSYDR

    PSYDR Psychologist
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    yeah, you are right. i wasn't really thinking when i wrote that. edit on the way.
     
  24. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty
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    To answer when you stop worrying....I've been told when you are licensed and have a stable job and/or tenure. So uhm....most people have awhile. :(
     
  25. paramour

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    Let's not completely leave out the research-oriented folks. Even if you have no desire to be a clinician or become licensed, then they typically still end up with a research based post-doc where they may see minimal (or even no) clients. Either way (clinician or researcher), you're going to see some extra years tacked on after your internship.
     
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  26. biogirl215

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    But you're social psych, not clinical/counseling, aren't you?
     

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