akd

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Does anyone know how much of a steady hand is required to be a podiatrist? Please let me know. I have essential tremors (a gene for shaky hands) that gets worse as one ages...how much fine motor skills does the podiatrist need?
 

Dr_Feelgood

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It depends on what you would like to do in podiatry. Surgery may not be an option but a wound care specialist might be in the cards. I would trim nails but you would certainly be able to assess biomechanics. So would tremors limit your practice, yes. But you would be able to fill your office hours with certain types of patients. The most important thing would be to find a practice or partner that could work with you to create a complete and efficient practice.
 

Podman

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Hi there, I don't know how extreme is your condition but I will tell you that podiatry generally requires a "steady hand" and great concentration especially that you will be working with delecate neurovascular and soft tissue structures during surgeries and will be performing very delicate procedures like ingrown toenails, etc. In fact, you can say that a major part of our work is procedure-based.
 
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Dr_Feelgood

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Podman said:
Hi there, I don't know how extreme is your condition but I will tell you that podiatry generally requires a "steady hand" and great concentration especially that you will be working with delecate neurovascular and soft tissue structures during surgeries and will be performing very delicate procedures like ingrown toenails, etc. In fact, you can say that a major part of our work is procedure-based.
Would you not agree that he/she would be able to do general wound care and if in the right setting, could share the procedures with another partner. I can see getting through residency as a difficult battle but still it can be done.


Another venue would be teaching.
 

Podman

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Dr_Feelgood said:
Would you not agree that he/she would be able to do general wound care and if in the right setting, could share the procedures with another partner. I can see getting through residency as a difficult battle but still it can be done.


Another venue would be teaching.
As long as his condition does not interfere with his ability to deliver as a clinician then its fine. However, I disagree with the notion to "share procedures with another partner". You should be trained in all aspects first because legally with his degree he can perform any procedures entailed by his board certification and degree. On that note, I would expect every enrolled student to complete a similar standard level of clinical skills - whether or not these skills are all employed by the future practitioner then that is upto his or her discretion of course.

Regarding the teaching venue, this is also another problem because most clinical teaching positions require either a DPM, MD, or DO. If he is looking for basic science instruction, then why not invest in a PhD or a Masters degree in Anatomy or Phisiology etc.

Again, I just want to make sure to establish that I don't know the condition of the applicant and I cannot assess if he or she can adequately perform the clinical skills requried, so it is ultimately upto the discretion of the OP to directly speak with his or her physician and any of the administrators at the colleges of podiatric medicine.
 
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