jejun

7+ Year Member
Sep 6, 2009
63
2
Status
Medical Student
It seems like a lot of the details in some of our class notes (i.e Neuro & Histo) are unnecessary for a strong clinical foundation or preparation for step I.

Does it make sense to base studying primarily on the best Step I review books for a particular subject (BRS, RR, etc)?

i.e would it be better to read BRS 2-3 times, and the class notes once even though I will miss some of the details? I rather read high-yield material more than low-yield material... but I don't want to feel screwed for having a shallow depth of learning.

Also: my school only has P & F for the first two years. The top 10-15% get AOA after third year and this is heavily based on third year performance.

Comments and experiences are appreciated.
 

rem6775

7+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2010
205
3
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I always used class notes and the textbooks for the classes myself. The class notes, and the textbooks, were always more detailed and in-depth, but I always liked that personally. I generally used review books for a quick review before the subject NBME exams, and I always found them fairly easy. My thought process was that I'd rather learn the details well the first time and maybe learn too much than just try to focus on "high-yield" material the first time through. For me, you simply don't make the same kind of connections or gain the same knowledge that way. But I don't take Step 1 until June 4, so we'll see I guess.
 
Mar 13, 2010
84
1
Status
Medical Student
It seems like a lot of the details in some of our class notes (i.e Neuro & Histo) are unnecessary for a strong clinical foundation or preparation for step I.

Does it make sense to base studying primarily on the best Step I review books for a particular subject (BRS, RR, etc)?

i.e would it be better to read BRS 2-3 times, and the class notes once even though I will miss some of the details? I rather read high-yield material more than low-yield material... but I don't want to feel screwed for having a shallow depth of learning.

Also: my school only has P & F for the first two years. The top 10-15% get AOA after third year and this is heavily based on third year performance.

Comments and experiences are appreciated.
it's good to have a deep depth of learning. sometimes, you have to chug through the details for the sake of doing well on exams. however, i doubt there's a lot of anatomy or histology (beyond what's in FA or other resources) that will show up on Step I. Good way to approach it would be to study whatever crap people require u to know on exams.... and then immediately after each exam set, go back and review the boards sources and make sure the high yield facts stick. The more you know, the better. But there's always more to learn... so choose wisely.