Stoichiometry

Discussion in 'DAT Discussions' started by Awuah29, Apr 14, 2007.

  1. Awuah29

    Awuah29 Christian predent
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    How many moles of O2 are needed to react with 304.5 g of Cs2 in the combustion reaction below

    Cs2(l) + 3o2 (g)---- Co2(g) + 2 So2 (g)

    the ansewer is 12 mole, but I get 6 moles when I set it up.

    How may grams of H2o will form when 10g of NH3 mixes with 10g of O2 according to the reaction below.

    4 NH3(g) + 5 o2(g)----4 No2(g) + 6 H2o
     
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  3. skyisblue

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    Hi Awuah, the answer key is right. It is 12 moles of O2 needed.

    First, convert CS2 to moles and you get 4 moles of CS2. Then, you do a mole ratio of the reactants to get the number of moles of O2.

    4 moles of CS2 x 3 moles of O2/1 mole of CS2 = 12 moles of O2.

    It would help if you capitalize the elements accordingly.
     
  4. Lonely Sol

    Lonely Sol cowgoesmoo fan!
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    Is the element, C and S (carbon and sulfur) or is it Cs (Caesium), if it is cesium then there is no way in hell it is 12, but if it C and S2 then it is 12. Yea, skyisblue is right, it must be C and S
     
  5. orthdent786

    orthdent786 Junior Member
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    for your second question- i think it is a limiting reactant question:

    1. 10 g NH3 X 1 mole NH3/ 17 g NH3 = 0.58 moles NH3
    2. 10 g O2 X 1 mole O2/ 32 g O2 = 0.3125 moles O2

    Since O2 has less moles it is the limiting reactant.

    Therefore;

    0.3125 moles O2 X (6 moles H20/ 7 moles O2) X (18 g H2O/ 1 mole H2O)=

    4.82 g H2O

    I think.. correct me if i'm wrong!

    skyblue your right
    Balanced equation is;

    4NH3 + 7O2 --> 4NO2 + 6H20

    correct?
     
  6. skyisblue

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    the 2nd question is a limiting reactant problem, but the equation is not balanced.

    Okay, with the balanced equation, I calculated it to be about 4.78 g of H2O.

    4NH3 + 7O2 to 4NO2 + 6H2O
     
  7. doc toothache

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    If it was cesium there would be no SO2, and for that matter no CO2. The only product would be CsO2.
     
  8. gochi

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    Correct me if Im wrong, but arent we not allowed to use calculators ?

    How am I suppose to do these difficult calculations w/o a calc ?
     
  9. Nasem

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    Relax, I heard the math problems on the DAT aren't highly difficult to compute... Most numbers I hear can be nicly rounded off to
     

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