Aug 28, 2020
23
10
Status
  1. Dental Student
Hello everyone
I am in my final year of dental school
Our study in my country is comprised of 5 years so I am a fifth year student
We started treating real patients last year, and this is when I really started struggling
I found clinics-especially the operative clinic- very stressful and I really did horrible in them
Once I enter the clinic, I am nervous and keep worrying about the clinic a week ahead!! In addition I really struggle with finding patients, wasting time during the clinic waithing for the faculty to check my work before I move on to the next step.... what I am trying to say is that last year was very stressful that made me hate the clinical aspect of dentistry! And my work was not good enough
I am always comparing my self to other colleagues which added to the stress, seeing other students improving their work while I am stuck at my place was so hard.
We are going back to school and clinics in one month(27-9) and i am already nervous and doubting my abilities. I used to be an “A” student and many of my colleagues thinks of me as “the first on the class”.. which is actually my goal but with my overthinking and bad work at the clinics I don’t think I can do it at all... any advices please? Are these thought common between dental students? Do you hate clinics? I want to feel that I am not alone
Is it common to hate dental school and then this could change when I start my private practice? Should I care less about the grades? Help please
 
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bracketbuster68

2+ Year Member
Jul 26, 2018
236
277
Lake Winnipesaukee
Status
  1. Dental Student
You're not alone. I feel the same way. It's frustrating doing massive fillings where nothing is ideal, especially when you go to restore. It's probably much easier to practice dentistry when you have patients on recall and you can fill teeth while carious lesions are still small. Nothing is worse than the waiting on instructors and having to get signed off. I'm sure they're frustrated with the lack of instructors too.
 
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drcobad

West Coast is Best Coast
Apr 13, 2020
363
454
Status
  1. Dentist
I couldn't get my first operative patient numb enough to drill. It took me about 5 years to get good enough with numbing that the company I worked for asked me to do full time root canals (many dentists hate doing root canals especially on molars). When you have anxiety or struggles, try to Keep It Simple and Stress-free. Try to start out with easier cases like small occlusals to build your confidence. Make sure your burs cut well so you won't struggle taking forever to prep. As for grades, do you best and after it's over, just feel good that you put your best efforts. You don't need to care what grades others are getting or what they think of you. If you are losing sleep over details, try to take a short breaks away from school at a gym, hiking/biking trail, pool, or do yoga. Many of your classmates are struggling just as well.
 
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drcobad

West Coast is Best Coast
Apr 13, 2020
363
454
Status
  1. Dentist
Many times, you many need outside inspiration to motivate you. In 1 month's time before you go back to school , I highly recommend you look up Dr. John Kois on Youtube and listen to him speak about dentistry. I had the luxury of attending his lecture at our jammed packed Convention Ctr Ballroom with about 500 (maybe 1000) other dentists. Though you may not learn anything from him on dentistry (he saves his secrets for his $$$ learning institute), he really inspires dentists to commit to excellence. He recommends a book called "Talent is Overrated" by Geoffrey Colvin that focuses on Deliberate Practice. Deliberate Practice is described as painful, specialized training that separates world class performers from average ones. Another source of inspiration is to read how Navy SEALs complete their impossible training.

IMO, worrying what others think may be unhealthy. As long as you're respectable to others, it doesn't matter to them. Trying to impress others may only bring a temporary thrill but at the end of the day, everyone will forget about you and go back to their families. Just doing your best every time without recognition will actually shape and elevate your reputation in a more permanent manner.
 
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Reactions: 1 user
Aug 28, 2020
23
10
Status
  1. Dental Student
You're not alone. I feel the same way. It's frustrating doing massive fillings where nothing is ideal, especially when you go to restore. It's probably much easier to practice dentistry when you have patients on recall and you can fill teeth while carious lesions are still small. Nothing is worse than the waiting on instructors and having to get signed off. I'm sure they're frustrated with the lack of instructors too.

Thank you, it feels better when you know you are not alone.I heard that dental school does not in anyway represent the real dental practice, hope we all end this struggle soon

Many times, you many need outside inspiration to motivate you. In 1 month's time before you go back to school , I highly recommend you look up Dr. John Kois on Youtube and listen to him speak about dentistry. I had the luxury of attending his lecture at our jammed packed Convention Ctr Ballroom with about 500 (maybe 1000) other dentists. Though you may not learn anything from him on dentistry (he saves his secrets for his $$$ learning institute), he really inspires dentists to commit to excellence. He recommends a book called "Talent is Overrated" by Geoffrey Colvin that focuses on Deliberate Practice. Deliberate Practice is described as painful, specialized training that separates world class performers from average ones. Another source of inspiration is to read how Navy SEALs complete their impossible training.

IMO, worrying what others think may be unhealthy. As long as you're respectable to others, it doesn't matter to them. Trying to impress others may only bring a temporary thrill but at the end of the day, everyone will forget about you and go back to their families. Just doing your best every time without recognition will actually shape and elevate your reputation in a more permanent manner.

Will definitely check the sources you mentioned, seem very helpful and interesting.. another question please, if I feel that I am still incompetent with some procedures( RCTs and for example class ll restorations), is it normal to feel like that even after graduation? Would I improve my skills in the private practice? because I am really thinking that being incompetent means that dentistry is not for me...
Thanks alot
 

drcobad

West Coast is Best Coast
Apr 13, 2020
363
454
Status
  1. Dentist
How many fillings (rough estimate) and RCTs does your school require to graduate? My sister graduated from the same school as me 11 yrs later. Her requirements were much less such as 4 bridges down to 1. This is due to fewer patients signing up with the school after a new community clinic opened down the street. Her classmates weren't getting enough cases to work on. When I was in the USAF, I attended a 2 week mini residency on more advanced restorative procedures. I noticed my partner really struggled with routine class II's and she later dropped out citing family emergency. I wondered if she also struggled during the practical Regional Boards since they require successful completion of those restorations. If you feel inadequate with your skills after graduation, consider applying to AEGD or GPRs.
 
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Aug 28, 2020
23
10
Status
  1. Dental Student
How many fillings (rough estimate) and RCTs does your school require to graduate? My sister graduated from the same school as me 11 yrs later. Her requirements were much less such as 4 bridges down to 1. This is due to fewer patients signing up with the school after a new community clinic opened down the street. Her classmates weren't getting enough cases to work on. When I was in the USAF, I attended a 2 week mini residency on more advanced restorative procedures. I noticed my partner really struggled with routine class II's and she later dropped out citing family emergency. I wondered if she also struggled during the practical Regional Boards since they require successful completion of those restorations. If you feel inadequate with your skills after graduation, consider applying to AEGD or GPRs.

Our requirements for fifth year roughly are : minimum 2 RCT for molar teeth( max is 5),minimum 2 preparations (max. is 5), minimum 10 multi-surface restorations
Thank you for your suggestions, I really did not know there is such programs for graduates..
Thank you so much for your advice
 

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