Maverikk

ASA Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2013
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Attending Physician
Hey all, I often ask my pharmacists at my hospital theoretical questions and they are ballers about explaining why some things aren't possible so let me ask you: why can't you give povidone-iodine intravenously? It's a broad spectrum abx used in surgery, I understand it wouldn't be good for the thyroid but is this the only reason why...I was just thinking about this because of a case of KPC bacteremia we had recently. Thanks for the help
 

Old Timer

10+ Year Member
May 16, 2007
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Pharmacist
Basically:

If you got a high enough concentration in the blood to kill the bug, it would probably kill the patient too.
 

StellargalS

lollipop! POP!
5+ Year Member
Oct 5, 2013
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Beach side Southern California
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Pharmacist
systemically iodine is rapidly metabolized and sequestered in the thyroid as u speculated. Prior to this it would be potentially corrosive to the peripheral vasculature although I found no direct information from which to draw this conclusion. Only indirect via information on oral administration.

http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search

Ultimately I gather it would need a specialized method of delivery to override these negatives. :shrug: