SDN members see fewer ads and full resolution images. Join our non-profit community!

surgical slang...

Discussion in 'Surgery and Surgical Subspecialties' started by sugababe81, May 9, 2007.

  1. sugababe81

    sugababe81 Junior Member 5+ Year Member

    15
    0
    Aug 27, 2004
    Is there such a thing? I came up with a few phrases that I feel are very "surgical" or at least "intern".. Can you think of others?

    “Hep Lock him”
    “Liver rounds”
    “Hang a banana bag”
    “Drop an NG” “Vent his G-tube” –
    “Clamp his G-tube” –
    “Her lungs are wet” –
    “She looks dry” –
    "she opened up"
    "PO challenge"
     
  2. SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads.
  3. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Staff Member Administrator Physician Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 15+ Year Member

    38,074
    25,737
    Apr 9, 2000
    hSDN Member
    Some off the top of my head, which may be used in other fields as well:

    "shall we dance?" - uttered when you are tying your scrub gown

    "peek and shriek" - to open the belly and find non-resectable disease or widespread mets, carcinomatosis

    "high slug titre" - lazy patient who won't get out of bed

    "retained farts" - picture of an SBO on a plain abdo film; alt: unborn farts

    "FOS" - alternative reason for SBO; full of &^%$

    "virgin abdomen" - no prior surgical history

    "gridiron or road map abdomen" - lots of previous procedures, scars and potential for a long day (and night) in the OR

    "line her/him up" - obtain central venous access

    "liquid cheeseburgers/steaks, etc." - TPN

    "milk" - Propofol

    "White cloud/black cloud" - refers to how much luck you have when you're on call; white clouds have a lot

    "Vitamin H" - Haldol

    "Whacked" - to remove, as in "we whacked out his appendix last night"

    "trying to help" - what you tell the anesthesiologist the patient is doing (ie, "she's trying to help") when the are moving on the OR table

    "fat pass" - gastric bypass

    "the box" - used to describe the anatomical area of the chest in which a penetrating missile injury needs to be explored in the OR

    "horrendoplasty/horrendoectomy" - used to describe extremely long and painful procedures

    "unfascinoma" - used to describe above, which sounded good, until the 12th hour; also for procedures/diagnoses which attendings are excited about but the residents less so

    "happy little campers" - kids in oxygen tents in the PICU

    "total gutectomy" - describes big whacks in which nearly everything is removed; corollary: "possible this, possible that" - describes consent form

    "strip the drain" - to attempt to remove clots from JP or Blake drains by grasping drain at its skin exit site and pinching it along its length

    "crack back the drain" - remove the drain by a certain amount over a certain period of time

    "trauma train/trauma two for 1" - refers to the trach and PEG procedures many trauma patients end up with

    "the garden" - refers to the Neurosx ICU where the vegetables live

    "feed and seed" - refers to care of patients in the garden

    "sips" - 30 cc/hr of oral intake

    "clears" - oral diet consisting of clear liquids (ie, water, cranberry juice, apple juice, Jello)

    "fulls" - oral diet which consists of creams (ie, yogurt, cream of wheat, puddings)

    "low residue" - diet often given to patients after colorectal surgery; low in undigestable fiber

    "sucking on the peace pipe/on the blower/tubed" - refers to a ventilated patient
     
    Spectre of Ockham likes this.
  4. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Banned Banned 10+ Year Member

    5,910
    29
    Feb 4, 2000
    "Is 'Fred' up?"

    "Almost got the bag out"
     
  5. njbmd

    njbmd Guest Moderator Emeritus 5+ Year Member

    9,050
    133
    May 30, 2001
    Gone Walkabout!
    Some of my favorites:

    "circling the drain" = dying patient
    "running toward the light" = dying patient
    "crispy critter" = burned patient
    "dose of I don't care" = Demerol
    "dose of I don't remember" = Versed
    "stew" = Emergency department
    "bite the tube" = intubate
    "smoke the anesthesia cigar" = intubate
    "squirrel" = medical student
    "fleas" = medicine folks
    "Philistines" = other surgeons
    "pack for whack" = pre-op patient
     
  6. Smurfette

    Smurfette Antagonized by Azrael Administrator Physician 10+ Year Member

    4,074
    1,833
    Jun 6, 2001
    clip and strip--remove staples and steri-strip
    stud--student
    slug--immobile patient
    tube test--clamping NGT or G-tube
    give the duke--dulcolax PR x 1
    paint--betadine
    liquid gold--hemoccult developer [hard to find]
    canoli--medicated packing placed in ano after rectal procedures
    suck and drip--treatment for psbo (NGT/NPO+IVF)
     
  7. tussy

    tussy Senior Member 10+ Year Member

    714
    5
    Feb 12, 1999
    Canada
    Pokemon (pronounced Poke - e- man) = interventional radiologists. As in consult the pokemon to drain that abscess.

    Ego boosting units - medical students or interns that follow a staffman around and make him feel important.

    The pitt - trauma room or emerg (depending on the hospital).

    Lap him = perform a laparotomy. As in "I don't know what's wrong with him, so let's lap him"

    Scan him = perform CT scan. As in "I don't know what's wrong with him so lets get a CT scan"

    Sucking plastic - intubated

    The other side of the curtain - Anesthesia world

    perc it - percutaneously drain an abscess

    C & C special (CABG and a Colostomy) - usually presents at 3am with a rising lactate in a post op CABG patient who's doing poorly and ends up having ischemic gut and needs an OR. The surgery team ends up following them for weeks until someone finally pulls the plug. as in "time to visit the C&C specials in the CVICU"

    Roids - hemmorhoids

    Flaming roids - badly thrombosed hemorrhoids

    Rotten roids - strangulated hemorrhoids
     
  8. FionaS

    FionaS Kitty sitting 10+ Year Member

    From my time in vascular:

    fem-pop - the original fem-pop bypass operation
    fem-flop - when you go back to do the embolectomy etc
    fem-chop - the final amputation...

    My reg and I would do the rounds and comment on what level our pts had reached...

    Closely related is the fem-dismal - the failed fem-distal bypass.
     
  9. Castro Viejo

    Castro Viejo Papa Clot Buster 10+ Year Member

    3,733
    5
    Jun 3, 1999
    Fem-Far Away: For the "Fem-distal bypasses."

    Fem-Pop, Fem-Clot, Fem-Chop: The other variation I've heard used.

    And the ever present, "Strong Work," used to congratulate any junior who's gone above and beyond the senior's orders and performed some menial task that's taken a big burden off: a) The Surgical Chief Resident, b) any senior, c) the entire surgical team and attendings.
     
  10. maxheadroom

    maxheadroom Rhinestone Cowboy Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    D&D -- Death and Donuts (another name for M&M)

    Penal Colony -- the Renal floor that often houses lots of patients on isolation for MRSA and other nasty bugs (the mid-level resident often owns the penal colony -- chiefs don't feel like going and interns will kill those patients)

    Celestial Discharge -- should be fairly clear

    Transfer to 9 West (in an eight floor hospital) -- same as Celestial Discharge
     
  11. Chronic Student

    Chronic Student So Fresh, So Clean 5+ Year Member

    808
    18
    Feb 7, 2006
    "Galloping amputations" - Gangrenous toe comes off, then foot, then BKA
    and then AKA.

    "Unicorn" - A patient with a "mino" in. (see below)

    "mino" - As in, he's gonna need a mino. Camino ICP monitor.

    "Downer" - Ativan and narcan. Kills most highs.

    "Blood-brain barrier" - Derogatory term used by some anesthesia folks
    refering to surgical drapes.
     
  12. BlackSails

    BlackSails 2+ Year Member

    865
    3
    Apr 4, 2007
    The CT surgeon I observed used that term, although in jest.
     
  13. dynx

    dynx Yankee Imperialist 10+ Year Member

    scode (slo-code) - running a code at a deliberate pace on a patient that really shouldn't be coded at all, "for the family" or just to "respect" the patients desire to be coded etc.

    SPAK - status post ass kicking. Loved this one on trauma

    Janitors fracture - Any fracture that's so obvious that a janitor could look over your shoulder and say..."hey, that sh*ts broken"

    Steel sign - on x-ray, wires from a prev sternotomy.

    Then the classics..two dudes,SOCMOB, unclear medicine, LOFD (looks okay from door)
     
  14. surgdo

    surgdo 5+ Year Member

    24
    0
    Oct 20, 2006
    Throckmorton's sign - The penis on x-ray always points to the side of injury
     
  15. RichL025

    RichL025 Senior Member 5+ Year Member

    422
    4
    Feb 6, 2005
    Washington
    "Laying crepe" - explaining a likely dismal prognosis to a family.
     
  16. dynx

    dynx Yankee Imperialist 10+ Year Member

    In the diagnosis of calcified penisitis morbidium? You're patients must be studs in bed.
     
  17. *Sucking plastic - intubated
    *Code - cardiopulmonary arrest
    *Slow code - go through the motions of resuscitating someone in cardiopulmonary arrest because they (1) should have been DNR/DNI, or (2) for the family's sake
    *Guts and butts - the general surgeon's domain
    *Bumps and lumps - the intern-level cases
    *Butchers - OB/GYNs :)
    *Death Star/killing fields - the one ward in every hospital where patients go to die
    *Rock - a patient that stays on your service forever
    *Cases - surgeries/operations
    *Stem to stern - an ex-lap where the incision goes from xiphoid to pubic tubercle
    *Spin the patient - CT scan
    *Double handshake - bilateral chest tubes
    *Drop a line - place a central line into someone
    *Drop a lung - cause an iatrogenic pneumothorax
    *Paint - Betadine
    *LGFM - looks good from door
    *Celestial discharge - patient died
    *Significant history - HIV positive
    *Drink the patient - give them oral contrast
    *Bag the patient - use an Ambubag to give the patient breaths
    *Big whack - big surgery
    *Squeezers - sequential compression devices

    Great thread!
     
  18. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Staff Member Administrator Physician Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 15+ Year Member

    38,074
    25,737
    Apr 9, 2000
    hSDN Member
    Spin the patient: alt. - to put on dialysis
    Zipper - sternal scar
    Airplane the patient - to rotate right or left on the OR table
    Kitten paw - Sen retractor
    Float a Swan - place a Swan Ganz catheter
    Yellow Snake - the Swan itself
     
  19. Of course, how could I forget this one? We ask Anesthesia to do this all the time. :)

    A few more regarding surgical instruments:

    *"Buzz me" (e.g. said by an attending) - to touch the Bovie electrocautery to whatever the attending's holding with his/her forceps/clamp
    *Holding hook - retracting
    *Water-skiing - retracting
    *Ribbon - malleable retractor
    *Pickups - forceps
     
  20. By the way, at our county (trauma-heavy) hospital, we also use the following terms when deciding what scans to order:

    *Grady special - CT scan of head, c-spine, chest, abdomen, pelvis
    *Grady special with gravy - all of the above plus face
     
  21. BlackSails

    BlackSails 2+ Year Member

    865
    3
    Apr 4, 2007
    Why would he ask for that?
     
  22. Dr. V

    Dr. V Senior Member 2+ Year Member

    239
    1
    May 16, 2006
    Johnson City, TN
    "They get the Full Meal Deal"- Means they will be getting CT C-Spine, Head, Chest, Abd, Pelvis

    "He needs a cup of coffee and a newspaper"- Constipated

    "Preop the patient"- Needs preop labs and consent

    "VA Handshake" or "Trauma Handshake"- Rectal exam

    "Theraputic intubation"- Needed intubated due to attitude/danger to self or the team, not because of respiratory compromise.

    "Rakes" sen retractors

    "Condom"- The sterile plastic ultrasound probe cover.
     
  23. Sometimes one will grab a bleeding vessel with pickups (commonly DeBakeys) - then it's the other person's job to touch the Bovie to the pickups to cauterize the bleeder. Of course, you always make sure the pickups aren't also touching the patient's skin.
     
  24. Krazykritter

    Krazykritter Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    903
    0
    Nov 4, 2005
    Blade28,

    I saw you mentioned Grady & you're located is in Atlanta, are you in Grady's G.Surg program? The reason I ask is b/c a month or so ago, my wife was flipping through the channels & stopped on something on CNN (almost shamed to admit that I watched something on CNN) & there was a program about residencies at Grady where they followed the residents. Was actually not too bad of a "documentary."
     
  25. SLUser11

    SLUser11 CRS 10+ Year Member

    2,869
    709
    Feb 22, 2005
    I watch those shows sometimes (on discovery health mostly, when they follow surgery residents on trauma), and they're fun. There's always times when you see them not following correct protocol or when they seem to do something incorrectly, and you're tempted to point the finger, but it's a lot easier for me to condemn their behavior from the comfort of my call room, and I'm not convinced that I wouldn't come off equally dumb or possibly dumber with a bunch of cameras around.
     
  26. Krazykritter

    Krazykritter Senior Member 7+ Year Member

    903
    0
    Nov 4, 2005
    I think Rogue is a pre-med...Touching the Bovie to the forceps allows the electric current to travel through the metal forceps & cauterize the bleeding vessel while not burning the surgeon b/c of the grounding of the cautery device.
     
  27. Yeah I know the NSGY guy featured in that program!
     
  28. MadameLULU

    MadameLULU Saucy Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    4,463
    16
    Aug 14, 2004
    KNOTSville
    Hilarious!! :laugh:
     
  29. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Staff Member Administrator Physician Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 15+ Year Member

    38,074
    25,737
    Apr 9, 2000
    hSDN Member
    run the sucker - use the suction device to clear the field

    beach-chair - sitting the patient up, while under anesthesia, so they appear to be sitting in a slightly reclined beach chair; often used in PRS when doing breast reconstruction and adjusting the appearance/symmetry of the implants

    double-scrub - when two attendings scrub on a case together; the resident usually suffers and ends up retracting

    un-zip - open or reopen a large incision

    metal poisoning - what a patient dies of when the junior resident puts a thousand clips in (say on a chole)

    tag, clip - aka Hemostat

    sponge stick - 4x4 folded and held in the jaws of a long clamp (you are not allowed to laugh, as I do, when recalling The Simpson's episode where Homer washes himself "with a rag on a stick")

    peanut - aka Kitner; small gauze piece held in the jaws of a short clamp or hemostat; used to push tissue away bluntly

    skeeter - mosquito clamp
     
  30. *Weed-wack/mow the lawn - use suture scissors to cut a large number of tied sutures (e.g. after a bowel anastomosis or open J-tube)
    *Run the bowel - pick up one end of the bowel (e.g. duodenum at ligament of Treitz) and carefully inspect its entire length for injuries, etc.
    *Cameraman - the one who operates the laparoscopic/thoracoscopic camera
    *Clamshell - a thoracotomy where the right and left incisions are joined by transecting the sternum
    *Crack open a chest - thoracotomy
    *Spiked a temp - became febrile
    *Heplock - to use a heparin flush to keep a peripheral IV open and unclotted
    *KVO/TKO (keep vein open/to keep vein open) - run IV fluids at a low rate to keep the peripheral IV open, usually around 5-10 mL/hr
    *INT - a peripheral IV
    *Pump on the chest - chest compressions
    *White cloud/milk of amnesia - propofol
    *Vitamin L - Levaquin
    *Vitamin H - Haldol
     
  31. Dr. V

    Dr. V Senior Member 2+ Year Member

    239
    1
    May 16, 2006
    Johnson City, TN
    LOL, when we say "Vitiman L" it's Lortab.

    He "ran out of vitimans" means he is looking for Lortab.

    "Lead Poisioning" means they died of a GSW "He died of lead poisoning" or if he didn't die he "got a dose of lead poison".
     
  32. Chronic Student

    Chronic Student So Fresh, So Clean 5+ Year Member

    808
    18
    Feb 7, 2006

    Just had to add - Peanut: AKA Kitner, pusher, cherry and 10 other names

    and can't forget

    Cottonoid- AKA patty, kite, noid

    or

    hemostat: snap, crile, kelly, pean, tag, mosquito (some of these are actually different instruments, but there is a lot of cross usage.)

    Spoon - having two curved clamps pointing in the same direction.

    Whip 'em - patients going to get a whipple (oh, just saying it makes my feet hurt and tears start to well in my eyes)
     
  33. Castro Viejo

    Castro Viejo Papa Clot Buster 10+ Year Member

    3,733
    5
    Jun 3, 1999
    Unfortunately some surgical residents in some programs are treated like "Bovie Monkeys" and do little dissecting and just "buzz" where necessary.
     
  34. Smurfette

    Smurfette Antagonized by Azrael Administrator Physician 10+ Year Member

    4,074
    1,833
    Jun 6, 2001
    "pan scan"--the trauma CT head/chest/arch/abdomen/pelvis/c-spine

    "head bonk"--any trauma victim with loss of consciousness (LOC) after head injury

    "vitamin Z"--zosyn

    "found down"--trauma victim found unconscious with unknwon mechanism of injury

    "chart biopsy"--check chart for other services' plans on patients

    "chart dehiscence"--when you drop the chart and everything falls out.

    "loading the boat"--getting senior/attending involved with a patient aka covering your @ss.

    "treat and street"--treat patient, send home same day

    "roach"--a patient who can't be killed, usually a dirtbag trauma victim who has numerous near-lethal complications who gets better just to return to being his rude/disrespectful/inappropriate/ungrateful self
     
  35. exlap

    exlap Junior Member 5+ Year Member

    18
    0
    Nov 7, 2005
    double dip - EGD and colonoscopy
     
  36. eastcoastyall

    eastcoastyall Wisdom Onslaught 5+ Year Member

    87
    0
    Feb 17, 2007
    "drive the bus" -- to be the camera driver in a lap case.
     
  37. awolf

    awolf New Member

    3
    0
    Dec 28, 2005
    "transcranial lead therapy"
     
  38. danielmd06

    danielmd06 Neurosomnologist Physician 7+ Year Member

    944
    18
    Sep 9, 2006
    Florida
    Cockroach factor - Like the insect, a patient's ability to survive a traumatic or otherwise highly strenuous situation (as in a hospitalization) is inversely proportional to his contribution to society.

    Pucker factor - The constriction of your anal sphincter is directly proportional to the patient's risk of sudden death. Common term among surgeons.

    Suck plastic - To be intubated and supported by ventilator. Best used as a verb.

    B-52 - To receive a combined dose of 5mg of Haldol IV and 2mg of Ativan IV.

    Squirrel - An untrustworthy patient whose complaints do not logically coincide with their medical problems.

    Going to meet Joe Black - To undergo a celestial discharge. Joe Black may also be consulted for a case.

    Interesting case - Any transfer from an outside hospital that should ostensibly be admitted to the Gastroenterology service, but that the fellow feels should instead be admitted by the Internal Medicine service with a GI consult. Especially utilized in reference to patients that are unmitigated disasters with no accompanying chart or documentation.

    Vitamin L - Levaquin.

    SNAFU - Situation normal...all f**ked up.

    TARFU - Things are really f**cked up.

    FUBAR - F**ked up beyond all repair.

    BOHICA - Bend over...here it comes again.

    ESBAM - Eat s**t and bark at the moon.

    Flea - Internal Medicine physician. Commonly used by surgeons.

    Blade - General Surgeon. Commonly used by surgeons.

    Neuron - Neurologist.

    ROAD - Dermatologist. Acronym for military-esque phraseology "Retired On Active Duty."

    Eyeball - Ophthamologist.

    Gas - The Anesthesiology department.

    Those who are passionate about the genitourinary sytem/intestinal tract - Term alternately utilized to denote those practicioners of Nephrology, Urology, Gastroenterology, and Colorectal Surgery.

    Masochist - Someone who takes pleasure in pain. Also commonly used in reference to the Trauma surgeon.

    Sadist - Someone who takes pleasure in causing pain for others.

    Sadomasochist - Neurosurgeon.

    Stud - A medical student.

    Sellout - Derogatory term applied to a Plastic surgeon.
     
  39. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Staff Member Administrator Physician Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 15+ Year Member

    38,074
    25,737
    Apr 9, 2000
    hSDN Member
    This is the patient that the Attending or fellow finds fascinating but requires no end to the work done by the junior residents who will get none of the "thrill" of operating on said fascinoma.


    Honestly, I've never heard that used. I thinks I will start signing my charts that way! ;)

    Also gas passers, gas bags, windbags...

    What, like the "pecker checkers", "butts and guts"?:D

    Compliment them on their Armani suits or Gucci loafers, or their new blonde highlights. They like that.;)
     
  40. debvz

    debvz Wandering Spleen 7+ Year Member

    250
    2
    Apr 13, 2004
    Swan-dom - the protective plastic sheath over the Swan
     
  41. maxheadroom

    maxheadroom Rhinestone Cowboy Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Ah yes, the necessary jokes about the Plasticians begin. Just remember, when your eyelids are droopy in 15 years, you'll come knocking!!

    And yes, the suits are nice. :D
     
  42. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Staff Member Administrator Physician Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 15+ Year Member

    38,074
    25,737
    Apr 9, 2000
    hSDN Member
    15 YEARS? You mean they aren't supposed to be drooping already? ;)

    I don't know what is worse, that I can tell they are droopier than when I took my last passport photo or that they aren't droopy enough to get the work done and paid for by insurance because they interfere with my work!

    Thanks for the advice...don't worry, IRL I am very nice to my PRS colleagues.
     
  43. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Staff Member Administrator Physician Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 15+ Year Member

    38,074
    25,737
    Apr 9, 2000
    hSDN Member
    I like, I like. :D
     
  44. danielmd06

    danielmd06 Neurosomnologist Physician 7+ Year Member

    944
    18
    Sep 9, 2006
    Florida
    KISS - Keep It Simple, Stupid

    Neuroslavery - Derogatory term applied to the field of Neurosurgery by Orthopaedic surgeons. Derived from the extreme hours of the residency and private practice.

    Orthopod - Common term for an Orthopaedic surgeon.

    Caveman - Derogatory term for Orthopaedic surgeons. Derived from the slogan "So easy even a Caveman can do it!"

    "Bone break...need fix" - Phrase commonly uttered with a guttural intonation by Orthopaedic surgeons.

    S2 - Sit the f**k down and shut the f**k up.

    Ghost - Derogatory term for medical students derived from their penchant for invisibility, absence during difficult situations, silence when asked for volunteering, and stealthy evasion of scut.

    Floating - How ghosts get from "here" to "there."

    Rays - The Radiology department.

    Sieve - Emergency physicians of less than desirable intellectual quality. Derogatory term referring to the relative inability to effectively screen patients and bar those not requiring hospitalization from admission.

    Wall - Emergency physicians who properly screen and block inappropriate admissions. This is a term of sincere and deep respect bestowed by admitting teams with serious consideration and gratitude.

    PD - Acronym for derogatory moniker "pencil d**k." Commonly applied to lazy physicians who pass work on to their peers. Not to be confused with "Program Director."

    San Francisco twist - A technique of performing a digital rectal examination whereby the physician or medical student hooks the index finger in a half-circle upon insertion. Aids in prostate exam.

    The Promised Land - Homage to the biblical region of Canaan that ancient Israelites wandered in the wilderness for forty years to reach. Term that alternately refers to private practice, and the fourth year of medical school.
     
  45. SuitsYou

    SuitsYou Oooh! 10+ Year Member

    115
    0
    Nov 16, 2004
    'Bug-Juice' - Abx
    'This patient is biochemically dry' - This patients BUN/Cr is through the roof and this is our excuse
    'Time-bomb' 9cm AAA preop
     
  46. BurnOnMyYeeeow

    BurnOnMyYeeeow

    9
    0
    May 17, 2007
    Fun thread :)

    From my hospital where I trained:

    Hat trick: trach, PEG, IVC filter (trauma patients)

    Variation on one listed above: the Scumdex. What's his scumdex? 1 pt for every tattoo, extra piercing, IVDU scar, etc. Higher scumdex = proportional to likelihood of survival

    Colobooty: Colorectal surgery

    Hope'n'scope: Diagnostic laparoscopy to check for metastatic disease prior to opening for whipple vs just sending to Heme/Onc. If you're the attending, you hope for no disease. If you're the student...

    Smartest part of the body: AKA: the Rectum. Because it can recognize the difference between stool and flatus, let one pass while retaining the other. Often, even the brain-mouth or brain-hand-pen axis cannot do that.

    MAFAT (May-fat). Mandatory Anasthesia F*** Around Time, precedes any incision.

    AMF YOYO: Adios my friend, you're on your own. Had a trauma surgeon who used to say that to ambulatory minimal stab wound type traumas after treat and street.

    KOKO: Keep on Keepin' on. Had a chief who used to write this in his consult notes if there was no new recs.

    Colon Blow: Golytely.

    Not enough sand: What do you call 1000 lawyers buried up to their necks in sand?

    First opponent: First assistant who is not helping or causing delays.

    The enemy of "good" is "Better" AKA quit while you're ahead.

    Insults: Consults. Any new insults today?

    Rack: Bed. I'm gonna go rack.

    Rack time: sleep

    CLOMI: (Kloh-mee) "Plan is clomi." Cat like observation and masterful inactivity.

    Hollywood code. Version of the slo-code.

    F.O.S. Full of S***

    Unclear medicine = Nuclear medicine. The V/Q scan read is: Intermediate probability, clinical correlation required.

    Send him over the hedges = Send the patient to radiology. AKA: What is the national flower of Radiologica? The hedge.

    Fem pop/clot/chop variation. How long has this patient been here? Well, he's pretty short. Ah, I see.
     
  47. SurgSoon

    SurgSoon New Member

    6
    0
    Jan 9, 2006
    FIELDS OF MEDICINE:
    Pediatrons - pediatrics
    Boneheads - ortho
    Medis - medicine
    Pee pee docs - urology
    Scrape and staple - burns

    LOCATIONS:
    Death star - MICU

    PATIENTS:
    Sunshine - entitled, arrogant patient (e.g. good morning, sunshine, how are you?)
    Winner - one with very good luck (i.e. that 30yo M with GSW to face is a real winner)
    DUMP - dreadfully under managed patient
    Transfer - patients other places don't want to deal with

    NOTE SHORTHAND:
    Thank you for this interesting consult - this is f*cking b%llsh*t
    Please consult us if new surgical issues arise - please never page me again
    Will follow from a distance - i'll check you labs/studies but never set foot in you room again
    Please optimize medical treatment - don't call us until you've done your job first

    IDENTIFYING DETAILS:
    Fanny pack - anesthesia
    Little black bag - neurology
    High heels - psych, radiation oncology, derm
    Clip-on koala bears - peds
    Calstat - ID
    No contact precaution gown - surgery
     
  48. These are so true! :thumbup:
     
  49. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic! Staff Member Administrator Physician Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 15+ Year Member

    38,074
    25,737
    Apr 9, 2000
    hSDN Member
    The last one really made me laugh. Our ID people said they had the hardest time getting the surgeons to really follow the increased precautions...it just takes too darn long sometimes!
     
  50. Chronic Student

    Chronic Student So Fresh, So Clean 5+ Year Member

    808
    18
    Feb 7, 2006
    I love this thread.

    -Mike
     
  51. maxheadroom

    maxheadroom Rhinestone Cowboy Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    The Tooth to Tattoo ratio is an excellent predictor of any number of patient demographics.
     

Similar Threads
  1. JMalley
    Replies:
    28
    Views:
    4,807
Loading...

Share This Page