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Tapeworm treatment question

Discussion in 'Pre-Veterinary' started by sofficat, Apr 29, 2007.

  1. sofficat

    sofficat AU CVM c/o 11
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    I can't really get a straight answer on why we treat tapeworms twice (either 2 or 3 weeks following the first treatment). The instructions on the bottles (in my examples Cestex and Drontal) say "give (blank dose) orally once." However, all doctors that I have worked for just say, 'no ignore that, we'll repeat in 3 weeks.' The best answer I got so far was regarding if the pet was still fighting the flea issue at the time of treatment we should deworm later too. Does anyone have their 2 cents worth? Thanks :barf:
     
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  3. mtrl1

    mtrl1 UC Davis Class of 2011
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    I believe it's to target the eggs/larvae that hatch in the interval
     
  4. sofficat

    sofficat AU CVM c/o 11
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    Wouldn't the bottle require the repeat, then?
     
  5. mtrl1

    mtrl1 UC Davis Class of 2011
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    I just checked Plumb:

    "Fasting is not required nor is it recommended before dosing. A single dose is usually effective, but measures should be taken to prevent reinfection, particularly against D. caninum. Tablets may be crushed or mixed with food. Because tapeworms are often digested, worm fragments may not be seen in the feces after using."
     
  6. Habibti

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    http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_tapeworm.html

    It has to do with the lifecycle of the tapeworm.
    "[SIZE=-1]Larval fleas are generally hatching in this vicinity and these larvae are busy grazing on organic debris and flea dirt (the black specks of digested blood shed by adult fleas to nourish their larvae). The flea larvae do not pay close attention to what they eat and innocently consume tapeworm eggs.[/SIZE]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    [SIZE=-1]As the larval flea progresses in its development, the tapeworm inside it is also progressing in development. By the time the flea is an adult, the tapeworm is ready to infect a dog or cat. The young tapeworm is only infectious to its mammal host at this stage of its development. The flea goes about its usual business, namely sucking its host’s blood, when to its horror, it is licked away by the host and swallowed.[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=-1]Inside the host’s stomach, the flea’s body is digested away and the young tapeworm is released. It finds a nice spot to attach and the life cycle begins again. It takes 3 weeks from the time the flea is swallowed to the time tapeworm segments appear on the pet’s rear end or stool
    [/SIZE]
    [SIZE=-1]
    So... the reason...
    [/SIZE]
    [SIZE=-1]Only one treatment is needed to kill tapeworms present; however, many clinics recommend a second injection in three weeks. The reason for the second injection is this: If the owner finds out at the time of their office visit that they need to control fleas to control tapeworms, they will need at least a month or so to control the fleas. [/SIZE]
    [SIZE=-1]After the first treatment is given, there is no reason why the pet cannot immediately reinfect itself. It probably will reinfect itself at some point. By seeing the animal in three weeks and giving another treatment after the fleas are controlled, there is a good chance that the tapeworms will not just be back three weeks later. It takes three weeks from the time tapeworms are swallowed by the pet to the time segments can be seen by the owner.[/SIZE] ​
    [SIZE=-1]On the other hand, who knows when the pet will swallow another infected flea? Our recommendation is that a single treatment be administered whenever segments are seen."[/SIZE]
     
  7. sofficat

    sofficat AU CVM c/o 11
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    thanks- that's pretty much what i thought, but it's nice to get the answer officially.
     

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