sam handwich

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There is one thing that I absolutely enjoy doing, and that is teaching (TA'ing for my profs). I can see myself doing this for long periods of time. I however would not pursue a ph.d because i am not interested in research so much. If i could get an MA and then teach at a CC, i would be happy.

I hear that the only way to make enough money at a CC is being full time and tenured. My first question is what type of MA should i earn if i want to get hired at a CC (ie. does it make more sense to get a research or I/O MA over an MA in counseling?)?

My second question is, how difficult is it to get hired as a full time instructor at a CC, and is the pay sufficient? I live in California and plan on staying here, or possibly living in portland for a while. I really just like teaching! I dont mind research, but i dont want to pursue it as a career.
 

WannaBeDrMe

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I can't speak to California, but in my state, NC, the only requirement for teaching @ a CC is to have 18 graduate credit hours within the discipline you are trying to teach. They are 100% firm on that minimum requirement but beyond that... it's open.

For the record, here, even full-time faculty don't make that much money. Definitely not as much as at the university level. My grad program university profs all lived in 2 million dollar houses (though I don't know how in the hell they afforded it... I need to go back and work there, gotta be something shady, pocketing some NIH grants maybe, ha)...
 
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tears for susan

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I'm not sure if CC have full-time faculty, as most of the job options for CC's tend to be adjunct. It is worth exploring, though I'm not sure how much $$ a person can make going that route.

Its shame that the one thing i think i really might like doing is a job that has bad security and low pay.
 

Rapunzel

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Those faculty probably work 80+ hours per week maybe doing therapy in addition to teaching, and have spouses with good jobs. And probably are never home to enjoy those 2 million dollar houses. Everything has trade-offs.
 

Phyroxis

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There is one thing that I absolutely enjoy doing, and that is teaching (TA'ing for my profs). I can see myself doing this for long periods of time. I however would not pursue a ph.d because i am not interested in research so much. If i could get an MA and then teach at a CC, i would be happy.

I hear that the only way to make enough money at a CC is being full time and tenured. My first question is what type of MA should i earn if i want to get hired at a CC (ie. does it make more sense to get a research or I/O MA over an MA in counseling?)?

My second question is, how difficult is it to get hired as a full time instructor at a CC, and is the pay sufficient? I live in California and plan on staying here, or possibly living in portland for a while. I really just like teaching! I dont mind research, but i dont want to pursue it as a career.

Find a Psych teacher at your CC, or a CC you're interested in teaching at, and talk to them. :)

I live in California as well, I know at my CC there are tenured faculty who have been around for 18+ years.. In fact I know of a married couple both teaching here, they seem to be staying afloat.
 

cbrons

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Those faculty probably work 80+ hours per week maybe doing therapy in addition to teaching, and have spouses with good jobs. And probably are never home to enjoy those 2 million dollar houses. Everything has trade-offs.

My research advisor supervises the graduate program in general experimental psychology at my university. This guy makes 6 figures and is in the office ~10h/week. I was just at his house for a Christmas party awesome digs
 

tears for susan

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for teaching at the community college level, its best to get an MA in general/experimental psych. However, I am kind of irked by how there is such a focus on research in these programs when all I want to do is teach. Why isnt there an MA that is teaching focused?
 

CalGal98

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I can chime in!

If you're looking to teach PSYCH, then you want a Master's in Psych. If you want to do Counseling (including academic, personal, career) as well as teach then look for a MS in Counseling. Basically, you need a master's in the field you enter, or a BA in the field and Masters in related field. For example, I know someone who has a BA in Psych and MS in Counseling and does both - teach Psych and does career counseling with some personality/career assessments.

As well as teaching, faculty are expected to serve on campus committees. Many will also coordinate special programs and serve as advisers to student clubs.

In California, there are full-time tenure-track positions opening over the next 10 years. Many of the faculty are aging out and retiring. Yes, you need to do your time as an adjunct to gain experience and fully be prepared when you enter a FT position. That's just the way it is. Some will only adjunct for a year, others for many.

You can earn some very descent pay - starting range is $45 on the low end (little/no years of ft teaching experience and only MA), to upwards of 100K+ (about 6 yrs experience ft and advanced units/degree/Phd/Ed.D.).
Most full-time faculty have the opportunity to earn "overload" or overtime at a higher hourly rate than adjunct.

Pay will vary from district to district. See the following for jobs:

California Community College registry for open positions:
https://www.cccregistry.org/jobs/index.aspx

but really, search local schools in your area and see the salary scale. Most will include full benefits, state retirement system, other perks (amusement discounts, book discounts at retailers, etc).
 

sam handwich

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I can chime in!

If you're looking to teach PSYCH, then you want a Master's in Psych. If you want to do Counseling (including academic, personal, career) as well as teach then look for a MS in Counseling. Basically, you need a master's in the field you enter, or a BA in the field and Masters in related field. For example, I know someone who has a BA in Psych and MS in Counseling and does both - teach Psych and does career counseling with some personality/career assessments.

As well as teaching, faculty are expected to serve on campus committees. Many will also coordinate special programs and serve as advisers to student clubs.

In California, there are full-time tenure-track positions opening over the next 10 years. Many of the faculty are aging out and retiring. Yes, you need to do your time as an adjunct to gain experience and fully be prepared when you enter a FT position. That's just the way it is. Some will only adjunct for a year, others for many.

You can earn some very descent pay - starting range is $45 on the low end (little/no years of ft teaching experience and only MA), to upwards of 100K+ (about 6 yrs experience ft and advanced units/degree/Phd/Ed.D.).
Most full-time faculty have the opportunity to earn "overload" or overtime at a higher hourly rate than adjunct.

Pay will vary from district to district. See the following for jobs:

California Community College registry for open positions:
https://www.cccregistry.org/jobs/index.aspx

but really, search local schools in your area and see the salary scale. Most will include full benefits, state retirement system, other perks (amusement discounts, book discounts at retailers, etc).

Yes I have confirmed that full time positions are awesome! However, some faculty insist that the new trend is to hire phd's over MA's. I dont know if this is true, but I am not willing to earn a phd.
I am also finding that most schools who offer a general psych MA gear it towards research. Most of these programs are designed to prepare their students for phd study. Research is part of any psych field, but I wouldnt be able to stand a program that is so focused on it.
 

psychlove

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Yes, you definitely need to be full time and tenured to do the CC route. I know of someone who is adjunct at a CC and only makes $10K...that involves teaching the max load of classes (3) and working around the clock to get lectures ready for those classes.

I'm not sure of in California but in other states I know most CC employ 100's of adjunct w/minimal benefits. You have to be adjunct for awhile before being promoted to full-time.
 

CalGal98

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^ CA State policies require that at least 75% of the courses be taught by full-time faculty. The few exceptions are in technical areas where current employers are more in-demand as they hold current skills and meet industry needs. The "adjunct only" teaching courses is a myth - at least here.

As a new faculty member, I do remember working around the clock. I guess it took about five years before I felt I "had it down" and could get into a good rhythm. I don't spin my wheels and spend as many hours now as I did when I started. You just learn to be better over time.
 

CalGal98

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Yes I have confirmed that full time positions are awesome! However, some faculty insist that the new trend is to hire phd's over MA's. I dont know if this is true, but I am not willing to earn a phd.
I am also finding that most schools who offer a general psych MA gear it towards research. Most of these programs are designed to prepare their students for phd study. Research is part of any psych field, but I wouldnt be able to stand a program that is so focused on it.

I think that really depends on the campus and where they want to go in the future with their relationships to the university, fundraising, leadership just wtihin the department. They may also want more faculty to enter the admin ranks, where the Ph.D./Ed.D. is preferred.

If you're really not interested in research psych, you may also want to find a psych/mft program that will be more focused on practice, and then just not do all the hours for the MFT License. I know a few that have done that as well.
 
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