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Technical Info about Rad onc?

Discussion in 'Radiation Oncology' started by Sagor, Nov 12, 2005.

  1. Sagor

    Sagor New Member

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    Hello everyone:

    I am new at this forum. I am one of the 200+ unfortunate fourth year medical students who are applying for Rad Onc this year. In preparation for my fourth year elective as well as the (few!) upcoming interviews, I wanted to make myself knowledgeable about some of the basics that I would be expected to know at my level.

    With that said...I would appreciate info or where to look for the info such as websites and/or papers/journal articles etc. regarding the following:

    1. The new and old technologies+concepts in Rad Onc. I have heard about the new technologies (such as in FAQ, Tomotherapy etc.), it would be good to have a chronology in the appearance of them (starting from the old), may be a brief description and some websites or other place where I can get in depth information about each. I know, I will eventually have to go to pubmed...but any information to start with would be appreciated.

    2. what are some of the top journals for Rad onc.?

    3. Any introductory (I know all med students love review books!) text that I should try to get my hands on?

    Thanks.
     
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  3. CNphair

    CNphair Senior Member
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    To start, I would recommend "Introduction to Clinical Radiation Oncology" by Lawrence Coia. It is a small paperback that can fit in your white coat and gives you an intro to radiophysics, radiobiology, and basic treatment plans for different cancers. You might want to also consider the "baby" perez, "Radiation Oncology: Management Decisions." These are both paperbacks that are good lower-priced options for students. I would not purchase any of the major textbooks until you are a resident. And you might find a nice resident or pharm rep who will give you one.

    The major rad onc journal is the "Red Journal" or "International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics."

    Good luck!
     
  4. RadOncMan

    RadOncMan Member
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    Would AVOID the Coia text which is too outdated particularly for this field, not very well written, and not worth spending your money on. Baby Perez is OK but isn't concise enough for a good overview. As per any rotation in an Oncology related field, don't buy any book that is older than 2003. Use any good Oncology handbook or UpToDate for knowing pathophysiology and cancer staging and copy chapters from any resident's Leibel text which is the most updated text you can find.
     
  5. Ursus Martimus

    Ursus Martimus Ursus Martimus
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    Up to date? Please...This is not the best use of anyone's time. I could recommend, as I have, Cancer Management: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    http://www.cancernetwork.com/handbook/contents.htm
    or even:
    http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp?button=I+Agree#site
    or:
    http://www.cancer.gov/cancerinfo/pdq/adulttreatment

    As stated there are pharm reps lerking in the halls with comped copies. I would say however this is a concern that comes up every year. As someone with significant medical publishing experience, math and economics works against such a book. Ideally a "Radonc Secrets" would be great. If anyone out there is truly serious contact me. I couldn't devote lots of time right now, a biochem book is brewing, however a collaboration could be in order.
     
  6. cdf95cro

    cdf95cro Member
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    Don't know if its available yet, but there is a new book coming out by Mack Roach and Eric Hansen (sp?) that is supposed to be a "pocket bible" for radiation oncology....they had pre-order forms at ASTRO on the publishing row, and said it would be out "in a few weeks" then...
     
  7. stephew

    stephew SDN Super Moderator
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    Uptodate is an EXCELLENT way to approach cases and talks. I agree with Radoncmans' assessment of resources.
     
  8. binka_777

    binka_777 Member
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    thanks ursus, those are great web-sites. i personally do agree that uptodate offers a very superficial review of cancer-related topics.
     
  9. stephew

    stephew SDN Super Moderator
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    dont underestimate uptodate prior to going to see a patient or doing a presentation; its a useful staple that residents use quite a bit. its obviously not meant to suplant reading a text or journal. But its great at directing you to which papers *are* the standard of care or cuttingedge/controversial.
     

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