Tele ICU Salary

Discussion in 'Critical Care' started by nycitygas, 09.22.14.

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  1. nycitygas

    nycitygas ASA Member 5+ Year Member

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    I've gotten a few phone calls from recruiters regarding Tele-ICU. I have no desire to do it at this point in my career but was wondering if anybody knew how much these jobs paid? The numbers I have heard from my colleagues are wildly different ($150/hr to upwards of $300/hr).

    Might be some nice moonlighting money in the future though. Or a way to slow down once my back gives out.
     
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  3. secants

    secants about:blank 10+ Year Member

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    How exactly does this work? There's already an intensivist at said hospital and you're essentially a backup ICU doc to give advice or you're the main intensivist and manage patients through computers and cameras?
     
  4. dotcb

    dotcb --------- 10+ Year Member

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    I think this is more common in rural settings where ICU is primarily managed by hospitalist or inpatient family medicine. Consults for vent management, shock, hypothermia, coma/brain death, etc.
     
  5. nycitygas

    nycitygas ASA Member 5+ Year Member

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    The Tele-ICU job I have heard about works like this-there is a day attending who works from 7-5 and then at night an NP with the tele ICU as back up. The tele-ICU doc covers hundreds of ICU beds this way.

    The benefit is that these hospitals can't afford or don't have the volume for a night PM intensivist now have someone available for any emergencies ect.

    I'm not sure if the data shows any benefit but this seems to be catching on.
     
  6. jdh71

    jdh71 epiphany at nine thousand six hundred feet 7+ Year Member

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    The data, as it exists, is only from teaching hospitals, and shows better outcomes with a DAY intensivist, not with 24 hours in house coverage. So . . . some places are running with this ball, and I think should. It's generally going to be best to have that 24/7 coverage but unless a group is big enough it's just not going to happen, so in locations where you have to stretch the resources (ie you simply cannot have one or two intensivists covering both day and night all the time, they will burn out), this is a great option to allow for someone to be paying attention for questions by a hospitalist or an NP who is on overnight covering for the intensivist who is at home getting rest.

    I wouldn't do this work for less than 250-300/hour though. Night work sucks and you should get paid for it. Nicely.
     
  7. Silent Cool

    Silent Cool Member Banned 10+ Year Member

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    Are back problems all that common among gas docs?
     

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