Halley362

7+ Year Member
Jun 7, 2011
8
0
Status
Pharmacy Student
I am a pharmacist that received a prescription for terbutaline tablets for a patient that was having pre-term contractions. According to the prescriber, her cervix was not dilated and she was not prescribing terbutaline to delay labor but more as an "as needed" medication for the patient to use for its analgesic effect from contractions. I cannot find this as an indication anywhere in my resources but also admit I am no OBGYN expert. I ended up dispensing the medication - I did express my concerns about the risks involved to both the prescriber and patient. Can anyone shed some light on whether this a common or acceptable use for terbutaline?
 

Jecave

5+ Year Member
Apr 14, 2013
20
2
Status
Medical Student
The FDA issued a black box warning that limits Terbutaline’s use to inpatient use. During my training we’ve been taught to use Terbutaline as a last resort and not as a tocolytic.
 

anonperson

10+ Year Member
Jun 26, 2008
645
569
Status
Attending Physician
I am a pharmacist that received a prescription for terbutaline tablets for a patient that was having pre-term contractions. According to the prescriber, her cervix was not dilated and she was not prescribing terbutaline to delay labor but more as an "as needed" medication for the patient to use for its analgesic effect from contractions. I cannot find this as an indication anywhere in my resources but also admit I am no OBGYN expert. I ended up dispensing the medication - I did express my concerns about the risks involved to both the prescriber and patient. Can anyone shed some light on whether this a common or acceptable use for terbutaline?

Not common and not considered standard practice. Would not recommend
 
Aug 12, 2019
1
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I am a pharmacist that received a prescription for terbutaline tablets for a patient that was having pre-term contractions. According to the prescriber, her cervix was not dilated and she was not prescribing terbutaline to delay labor but more as an "as needed" medication for the patient to use for its analgesic effect from contractions. I cannot find this as an indication anywhere in my resources but also admit I am no OBGYN expert. I ended up dispensing the medication - I did express my concerns about the risks involved to both the prescriber and patient. Can anyone shed some light on whether this a common or acceptable use for terbutaline?
It's an old habit, they used to prescribe it off-label to stop preterm contractions at home, they don't do it any more.