billambeer

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Some have addressed the OKAP exam from different angles (such as its importance, etc) on SDN, but I haven't seen enough discussion on how to approach it seriously. I am writing this as a starting place for my future residency (I matched for 2014). If you feel like contributing, please by all means speak up. I need experienced input.

General areas of interest are: timing, Qbanks, texts. After addressing these, I have other things to say about the test from my research.

Executive Summary:
1. I will read 10 BCSC sections, deferring Neuro and Optics to Kline-Bajandas and Hunter respectively, by Feb 28. I will study an average of 20 pg/day until March at which time I will switch to review texts and Qbanks only; however before then I will try to incorporate other texts as I am able.
2. Besides BCSC texts I will use Tamesis, Friedman, and Melendez Audio throughout the year as place fillers.
3. I will take all BCSC (~600), Tamesis (~3000), and Provision (~550) Qs; totaling 4150 Qs. Friedman has questions that I will take as needed.
4. Texts I will definitely use: BCSC, Tamesis, Friedman, Hunter, Kline-Bajandas, and Provision.
5. Texts I may use: Melendez Buzzwords and Kanski Atlas.
6. Texts I will not likely use: Lamkin, Chern/Wright/Saidel, Eagle.

*TIMING*

First, the exam can take place anywhere from the end of March to the beginning of April. Planning, therefore, should be weighted to the first half of the PGY 2 year in order to be ready. I've read that PGY 4 OKAP performance best correlates to certification outcomes, so it's possible that some will tend to deemphasize PGY 2 study.

A disproportionate number of residents, professional instructors and others claim in almost every place I've looked that studying the Basic and Clinical Sciences Course (BCSC) is the best preparation for the OKAP. Timing stems from completing the 12 book series.

The following is taken from AAO's website for 2012-2013 as a way to study the BCSC. It seems nice. It doesn't include the Update on General Medicine section (Section 1) and I've heard from some that one should not spend time on Section 1 for the PGY 2 year exam because of intern year exposure.

AAO claims following this schedule will require you to cover 120 pages/week, but by my math it's more like 140-150. That seems reasonable as some weeks will be more productive and others less (like the beginning of PGY 2). They also claim the most high-yield books are scheduled for earlier in the year with weight given to junior residents' needs.

July 15 - Aug. 4: Fundamentals and Principles of Ophthalmology (397 pages, 20 pg/day)
Aug. 5 - 18: Lens and Cataract (231 pages, 18 pg/day)
Aug. 19 - Sept. 1: Glaucoma (220 pages, 17 pg/day)
Sept. 2 - 22: Retina and Vitreous (371 pages, 19 pg/day)
Sept. 23 - Oct. 13: External Disease and Cornea (445 pages, 22 pg/day)
Oct. 14 - 27: Orbit, Eyelids, and Lacrimal System (278 pages, 21 pg/day)
Oct. 28 - Nov. 17: Ophthalmic Pathology and Intraocular Tumors (352 pages, 18 pg/day)
Nov. 18 - Dec. 22: Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (418 pages) and Refractive Surgery (217 pages).. total: 635 pages, 19 pg/day
Dec. 23 - Jan. 1: Break for the holidays
Jan. 2 - 19: BCSC - Intraocular Inflammation and Uveitis (319 pages, 19 pg/day)
Jan. 20 - Feb. 9: Neuro-Ophthalmology (369 pages, 19 pg/day), see Kline (below) as alternative
Feb. 10 - 28: Clinical Optics (323 pages, 40 pg/day), see Hunter (below) as alternative
Feb. 28 - March 30: Tamesis, Kanski Atlas, Melendez Buzzwords, Provision Series (more on these in the Text section)

Throughout the year, in "free time": Friedman, Tamesis, Melendez Audio (more on these in the Text section)

Strategy summary: I plan to study 1 hour daily, no matter what. Given that I will be studying for the 2015 OKAP, I will probably have to recount, as the above is for 2012-2013 and BCSC is updated every year. It looks like if I read 20 pages/day, I'll be safe. Then I plan to mix in those texts noted in the "Throughout the year" section. I'm not sure how that will work because BCSC study seems burdensome as such. I'll have to play that one by ear. Maybe on call, after BCSC has been covered, I can go in that direction. I've heard that many consult the pathology section of BCSC during their review in the 3-4 weeks before the end of March.

*QBANKS*

I've encountered a number of resources, and from those some strategies have developed. Before I discuss strategies, I'll address available resources:

1. BCSC Qs: The first resource and what seems to be the most popular is to use the Qs in the back of the BCSC texts. I've read that some will only consult those in the Feb/March review. This seems like a big risk and myopic given the length to which book companies are making resources. I've look at the 2011-2012 BCSC texts and found that they only have 50 or so Qs per book (average length being 400 or so pages per book). 50 Qs in 12 books (600 total) seems insufficient alone.

2. Tamesis, Lamkin, Hunter: Apparently the review texts (see texts) have questions near their indices. Because I don't own any and the Amazon previews are limited, it's hard to say with all of them. The Tamesis and Lamkin texts only contain questions; their purpose is to serve as a paper Qbank. Tamesis' text claims to have 3,000 Qs. I can't find similar numbers for Lamkin. Hunter's last minute optics text is question-based, but it's Socratic and not a true test of knowledge. I've read from some that the Lamkin (MEEI) text is too esoteric for OKAP. Tamesis seems to have a better reputation. Both address general ophthalmology topics concordant with BCSC sections. Maybe someone can give some input here. Hunter seems like a no-brainer because optics itself is important. Kanski's review atlas seems like an obvious choice as well but maybe less comprehensive. It is a book full of picture quizzes that are often used in the OKAP.

3. Ophthoquestions: I have found some electronic Qbanks. The first I found was ophthoquestions.com. It seems like a nice way to study. You can sample their product before purchase (prices are like USMLE World, with same subscription architecture of 6 months, 12, etc). They claim to have 3116 questions but you cannot reset them after use. There is also a non-profit at ophthodeck.com that produces a free Qbank. It is severely limited, has a shoddy interface (you can see the correct answer below the question), and the quality seems suspect.

4. Provision: The AAO, in its ONE Network, has two Qbanks under the name Provision. Currently they are selling two services: Provision Series 5 and Provision: Preferred Responses in Opthalmology: Series 4. The Provision Series 5 is sold out, which probably means residents are using the print version; it must be popular. Both Series 4 and 5 have online and print versions with correspondent price changes (higher prices for print + online, lower for print only, etc). I don't have any informed opinions about this since I can't find many mention of it in internet forums. Given that it's popular (assumed from supply status), maybe getting the online version would be a good idea, with the optional print version. I've read from one blog that Provision questions tend to be easier than OKAP Qs.

Strategy summary: I plan to take the BCSC quiz questions after each book (~600 Qs) and the 3000 Tamesis Qs throughout the year, and then the Provision Qs in Feb/March review. Hunter seems like a reasonable set of optics Qs and a good substitute for BCSC's section. Provision 5 contains 550 Qs and Provision 4 contains 450. Assuming the 2014-2015 edition will have 550 I will have gone through 4150 Qs before my PGY 2 OKAP. Not knowing what the Provision print version looks like or how it differs from the online (is it a supplement?), this may change with experience. I'm leaning to Tamesis given Lamkin's poor reputation. ophthoquestions.com seems like an unnecessary purchase, but maybe it's something one could take advantage of in the Feb/March review because of its month-to-month pricing. Kanski's Atlas will be a big temptation but I think I'll place it in the ophthoquestions.com category because of how much exposure I will be getting in other places.

*TEXTS*

I will try to reference my study strategy into these texts, but the main purpose here is to discuss these texts' reputations and general purpose.

1. BCSC series (renewed every year)
- Seems to be the consensus primary study text. Most people on the web think it can be finished by Feb/end of Jan. I plan to read all 10 sections, exempting the Optics section in deference to Hunter (optics) as I've heard this is all one needs and it's shorter than BCSC. I will probably skim General Updates to be safe.

2. Chern/Wright: Ophthalmology Review Manual (last ed: 2011)
- This seems like a nice book. The latest edition has Saidel, rather than Wright, as coeditor. The amazon reviews are generally positive, though one notes weaknesses in neuro and optics. The book itself looks like First Aid in its structure, images, etc. I can't say that I would open it until Feb/end of Jan (if I get it at all) because I plan to occupy myself with Friedman, Tamesis, and others who are tried and have many editions in under their belts.

3. Chern/Wright: Review Questions in Ophthalmology (last ed: 2005)
- I heard about this book on this forum from an attending. It looks like a nice compliment to Friedman or other review texts. The only issue I see is that its last edition is almost 10 years old. Tamesis is only a year younger, so it could be that this is how things are these days anyway.

3. Tamesis: Ophthalmology Board Review (last ed: 2006)
- Of all of the review texts, as with BCSC, Tamesis seems like an essential and a consensus. It's a Qbank book with short Qs and short answers. I found these helpful in medical school and I suppose it would be good in ophthalmology as well. I like that these texts tend to address memorize-only things (like eponyms).

4. Lamkin: MEEI Review Manual for Ophthalmology (last ed: 2011)
- Rob Melendez, author of a famous audio review, has said that this is too detailed and overwhelming as it's not representative of OKAP structure or style. I have found some who swear by the book. Because of the number of texts available, I might hold off on purchasing as there will be considerable overlap with other "proven books," like Tamesis and Friedman.

5. Hunter: Last Minute Optics (last ed: 2011)
- I've read that most of what one needs in optics for OKAP is in this text. The editorialist who made this statement also suggested that the optics text in BCSC is too big/technical to read like a study book and more suited for reference. Therefore I will read this in the Feb 10-28 interval, in place of the BCSC section.

6. Eagle: Eye Pathology: Atlas and Basic Text (last ed: 2011)
- I saw this mentioned in one blog. In my admittedly irresponsible scanning of the text I found it too wordy and too thorough. Perhaps from the BCSC text pathology I'll decide if I need this in my review. Until then I'm counting it out.

7. Friedman: Review of Ophthalmology (last ed: 2012)
- This is the standard issue, bread and butter of many programs. It looks like Goljan in its structure and language (short and bulleted with colored images). I've also read that it is a good companion throughout the day for the "free" moments (much like Tamesis). Perhaps one has to decide whether the Chern/Wright/Saidel text is better than Friedman, or visa versa, and pick one over the other. From my superficial study this looks a little more in-depth and more appropriate for the needs of a resident. It also has quiz questions for each chapter which is not found in Chern/Wright/Saidel.

8. Kline and Bajandas: Neuro-ophthalmology Review Manual (last ed: 2007)
- I've read that the neuro-ophthalmology section of BCSC is poorly written and that this is a good replacement. Of course this opinion was written in 2010, so perhaps things have changed. I'm going to purchase the whole BCSC series so maybe I'll try to find the old BCSC (from 2010) and compare it with the one from which I will study (2014-2015) before getting too dedicated.

9. Melendez: Ophthalmology Buzzwords (edition date unknown)
- One source says this is good for "passive learners." Sometimes that is my description. I can't say that I would want to stretch myself this much, but it may be a good resource for others. I plan to not purchase this in deference to Tamesis, but after finishing it (if that happens), I'll consider it.

10. Kanski: Test Yourself Atlas in Ophthalmology (last ed: 2008)
- An image review text with very few words. It has a good reputation for preparing residents to see images and think of diagnosis with very little information. This might be more appropriate for end of study, during the 3-4 weeks before the OKAP. I do plan to purchase it as I believe that at a certain point I'm only going to want to look at books rather than read them thoroughly.

11. Kanski: Clinical Ophthalmology (last ed 2011)
-I'm getting a lot of PMs suggesting that this should be added as well. It is supposedly far and away the best introductory/intermediate level text. Quoting from one correspondent: "It takes about 3 months to get through at 10 pages/day, but it has great pictures that SHOW what things are and text that EXPLAINS what things are in an easy to understand and easy to remember fashion, unlike many of the other sources you listed. I found it much easier to go through the BCSC having read Kanski once, and much less painful starting residency knowing many of the terms and fundamental clinical concepts." I've started to read it in MSIV and I really like it. I've almost finished the lids section. While I don't think I'll retain everything, because it's really thorough, I like the introductory language.

OTHER NOTES

1. OKAP/Step1/WQE predictions research: The journal Ophthalmology has published several studies on resident performance in the Written Qualification Exam (WQE) and its relationship to OKAP and USMLE Step 1. WQE is the 250 Q, written exam given to residents by the American Board of Ophthalmology that determines, in part, their eligibility for the Oral Examination pursuant to receiving certification. I'll summarize Ophthalmology's findings: OKAP performance correlates significantly with WQE, but Step 1 does not correlate significantly with either OKAP or WQE.
2. The subject areas covered in the OKAP differ from topics in the BCSC and differ from those in WQE. There are 11 areas covered in the OKAP: Medicine; Fundamentals and Principles of Ophthalmology; Optics, Refraction, and Contact Lenses; Ophthalmic Pathology in Intraocular Tumors; Neuro-ophthalmology; Peds Ophthalmology and Strabismus; Orbit, Eyelids, and Lacrimal System; Cornea, Lens, and External Disease; IO Inflamation and Uveitis; Glaucoma; and Retina and Vitreous.

**Resources**
#. AAO schedule: http://www.aao.org/yo/newsletter/2012-print/article02.cfm
#. Good lecture-based review: http://www.nyee.edu/okap-and-board-review---lecture-schedule.html
#. One AAO representative on OKAP prep: http://www.aao.org/yo/newsletter/2012-print/article06.cfm
#. Melendez's blog: http://eyepearls.medrounds.org/2010/02/okap-preparation-pearls.html and http://eyepearls.medrounds.org/2010/02/golden-pearls-for-okap-exam.html
#. OKAP/WQE ref: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22841987 and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20619896
 
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odieoh

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You've got it all terribly wrong. You really need to think this through thoroughly before proceeding.
 

odieoh

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You just need a plan, man. Don't go at this all willy-nilly, do some research and find out what's out there!
 
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billambeer

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lol. am I being punked? are you Ashton Kutcher?
 

LightBox

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Thank goodness you were never my co-resident.

Let me give you one word of advice: overkill
 
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billambeer

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@lightbox. compliment in disguise?
 

guttata

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You are forgetting about the steep clinical learning curve during your PGY2 year. If I were you, I would start a clinic for the homeless and uninsured to enhance my clinical skills, starting in July 2013. You will have plenty of time in the evenings and weekends during your internship. Best of all, your clinics will not interfere with normal, daily clinic flow.

You also forgot to budget in the wasted 3 minutes (dilated exams only) per patient while on call. Once you refine your exam, you will be able to conduct a bedside/ER eight point eye exam in 137 seconds - 20 seconds for vision test, 4 seconds for pupil exam, 25 seconds for visual fields, 6 seconds for motility, 10 seconds for tonometry, 68 seconds for the slit lamp exam, 4 seconds for external exam. Bam, put in the dilating drops. You will have 3.2 minutes for chit-chat (subjective exam) and 3.8 minutes for scribing your exam. This leaves a whopping 3.0 minutes for faster lighter eye dilators, but as much as 13.0 minutes for darker eye slow-dilators. If my calculations are correct, giving a call schedule of Q4 and an average of 8.6 patients per weeknight and 15.2 on weekends, and an average light to dark iris ratio of 0.651, this will lower your RPPD (reading page per day) to 12.31. Totally doable. :D

Chance favors the prepared mind.


If you don't burn out, more gunning power to you.
 
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billambeer

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@guttata: what was/is your strategy?
 

Eyefixer

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I think this level of gunnerness ( is this a word?) should be an automatic disqualification from residency.
 

DrZeke

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This thread is officially terrifying. LOL
 

RestoreSight

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Certainly well organized review of resources. I think Kanski should be used as a primary text early on, especially during intern year.
 

linevasel

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Bill Laimbeer,

Nice Post. Totally wasn't up to speed on OKAP plans. Does anyone care to comment on how important OKAPs are for fellowship. My understanding is that they aren't part of the fellowship applications, but... programs will independently ask to see them, and they can sway the kind of letters your PD and attendings write for you.

So if you are interested in Cornea (or fill in the blank), is it better to get
a) 80th percentile in everything or...
b) 90th percentile in Cornea and 70th percentile in everything else

Am I thinking/gunning about this all wrong ?
 
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billambeer

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Certainly well organized review of resources. I think Kanski should be used as a primary text early on, especially during intern year.
So your only addition would be Kanski in the PGY 1? I have received some feedback from others suggesting that even reading all of BCSC is a bad idea (if the objective is to get top 10).
 
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billambeer

billambeer

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Bill Laimbeer,

Nice Post. Totally wasn't up to speed on OKAP plans. Does anyone care to comment on how important OKAPs are for fellowship. My understanding is that they aren't part of the fellowship applications, but... programs will independently ask to see them, and they can sway the kind of letters your PD and attendings write for you.

So if you are interested in Cornea (or fill in the blank), is it better to get
a) 80th percentile in everything or...
b) 90th percentile in Cornea and 70th percentile in everything else

Am I thinking/gunning about this all wrong ?
I've heard the same thing about PDs giving weight to their recommendations based on OKAP performance. The same goes for chief status.

I would be interested to hear everyone's opinion on OKAP's weight in fellowship applications, especially plastics because of the timing of its application.
 

Visionary

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I've heard the same thing about PDs giving weight to their recommendations based on OKAP performance. The same goes for chief status.

I would be interested to hear everyone's opinion on OKAP's weight in fellowship applications, especially plastics because of the timing of its application.
Varies, but when I applied back in 2007, very few programs even asked for OKAPs. Of course, now that the fellowship application is via SFMatch, I think all programs have access to the scores. What they do with them is the question.
 

JMK2005

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dont use provision. questions are too easy. i believe it is designed for recertification boards.
 
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billambeer

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dont use provision. questions are too easy. i believe it is designed for recertification boards.
ya, I read from Melendez that the Qs are "easier" but I didn't know they were for recertification. Thanks JMK
 
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billambeer

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Varies, but when I applied back in 2007, very few programs even asked for OKAPs. Of course, now that the fellowship application is via SFMatch, I think all programs have access to the scores. What they do with them is the question.
thanks for your thoughts. that seems to the consensus.
 

guttata

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Okaps: Friedman Review, Last Minute Optics, Kanski Atlas/Text, MEEI qbook, with scattered BSCS books. Ophthoquestions was not available when I was training, but I have heard good things about them (I have no affiliations)

For fellowship match, you would be better off using your time to bust your ass in clinic, to get to know the faculty, and to conduct research/case reports.
 

speyeder

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First off, kudos to the OP for laying out such a comprehensive study schedule. I've never seen anything like it. If you manage to stick to your plan you should do very well on the OKAPs and the boards.

Having said that, I agree with Guttata and many of the other contributors on this forum. OKAPs are not an important factor in the fellowship match, unless you're gunning for plastics or top tier surgical retina fellowships.

Even then, the quality of your LORs, publications and what you've done as a resident are weighted more heavily. So by all means, study hard for the exam, but pay equal attention to learning as much in the clinic and O.R. and being the best resident you can be. Attendings are much more likely to write awesome LORs and go to bat for conscientious, hard working residents than they are for mediocre residents with great scores.
 

MstaKing10

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Completely agree. I think many first year residents believe that the OKAPS are as important as the USMLE tests, when in fact, they are not. They should really only serve to test your abilities to pass the written boards, though, you will be asked for the scores from a handful of fellowship programs when and if you apply.

In general, I like to limit my sources. BCS, Chern, Friedmans, and Pearls in Ophthalmology were my only sources. Had Kanski for pictures. Wish Ophthoquestions was around when I was studying, would have used that and eliminated a few other sources.

I would advise against such an intense study schedule (ie. 20 pages per day goal) because you will be on call, you will be busy, and may not meet this goal. Such added stress is unnecessary.

First off, kudos to the OP for laying out such a comprehensive study schedule. I've never seen anything like it. If you manage to stick to your plan you should do very well on the OKAPs and the boards.

Having said that, I agree with Guttata and many of the other contributors on this forum. OKAPs are not an important factor in the fellowship match, unless you're gunning for plastics or top tier surgical retina fellowships.

Even then, the quality of your LORs, publications and what you've done as a resident are weighted more heavily. So by all means, study hard for the exam, but pay equal attention to learning as much in the clinic and O.R. and being the best resident you can be. Attendings are much more likely to write awesome LORs and go to bat for conscientious, hard working residents than they are for mediocre residents with great scores.
 

ophthope

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1. billambeer you are a baller, and your post makes me very glad that I matched into a program that already has some set out course for residents to read through BCSC

2. Everybody else - if there was ONE RESOURCE I could devour during the rest of M4/Intern year. One thing that I could read or listen to or learn that would make studying during PGY2 year easier, what would it be? Is there such a resource that will lay some groundwork and make the learning curve less steep that first Ophtho year?
 
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billambeer

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funny you say that now, I was feeling kind of down in the dumps before (if you've read earlier commentary). thanks for your thoughts
 
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billambeer

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First off, kudos to the OP for laying out such a comprehensive study schedule. I've never seen anything like it. If you manage to stick to your plan you should do very well on the OKAPs and the boards.

Having said that, I agree with Guttata and many of the other contributors on this forum. OKAPs are not an important factor in the fellowship match, unless you're gunning for plastics or top tier surgical retina fellowships.

Even then, the quality of your LORs, publications and what you've done as a resident are weighted more heavily. So by all means, study hard for the exam, but pay equal attention to learning as much in the clinic and O.R. and being the best resident you can be. Attendings are much more likely to write awesome LORs and go to bat for conscientious, hard working residents than they are for mediocre residents with great scores.
so your general message, and what seems to be a common thread here, is: do well on OKAPs, maybe reduce my study plan's breadth, and don't let its prep lead to sacrifices in daily stuff where residents show their true colors.
 
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billambeer

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Completely agree. I think many first year residents believe that the OKAPS are as important as the USMLE tests, when in fact, they are not. They should really only serve to test your abilities to pass the written boards, though, you will be asked for the scores from a handful of fellowship programs when and if you apply.

In general, I like to limit my sources. BCS, Chern, Friedmans, and Pearls in Ophthalmology were my only sources. Had Kanski for pictures. Wish Ophthoquestions was around when I was studying, would have used that and eliminated a few other sources.

I would advise against such an intense study schedule (ie. 20 pages per day goal) because you will be on call, you will be busy, and may not meet this goal. Such added stress is unnecessary.
A couple Qs:
1. I'm curious, why did you use both Friedman and Chern?
2. what kind of goal do you think is reasonable (if 20QD is too much)? I've heard from a lot of people that 10 pages daily is a minimum. I got the 20 figure from the AAO website which suggests that reading all of BCSC is a good idea. So if I don't cover 20ish daily, I won't be able to cover BCSC, which means you would suggest that I not read it?
 

speyeder

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so your general message, and what seems to be a common thread here, is: do well on OKAPs, maybe reduce my study plan's breadth, and don't let its prep lead to sacrifices in daily stuff where residents show their true colors.
Exactly. Take MstaKing10's advice and tone down the studying a bit. It's overkill. You only have so many hours in a day. A resident's life (even in ophtho) is busier than you might think. Add in on-call duty, grand rounds presentations, research, etc. and you will soon find out that there is not enough time to accomplish everything that you want.
 

MstaKing10

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A couple Qs:
1. I'm curious, why did you use both Friedman and Chern?
2. what kind of goal do you think is reasonable (if 20QD is too much)? I've heard from a lot of people that 10 pages daily is a minimum. I got the 20 figure from the AAO website which suggests that reading all of BCSC is a good idea. So if I don't cover 20ish daily, I won't be able to cover BCSC, which means you would suggest that I not read it?
Friedman is a great review book for the OKAP, analogous to First Aid for the USMLE. Chern is a question book only so complements Friedman's well. Like I said, I think Ophthoquestions from the reviews I have seen on this sight may be a better source for question analogous to Qbank or USMLE World for the USMLE's.

The BCSC books are where the questions ultimately come from so most important source. I read them cover to cover, skipping the Optics, Medicine and Refractive book (I think refractive is more important now so may not be able to skip this one nowadays). My goal was to finish one book per month, sometimes two books if the book was shorter (ie. Glaucoma). Our program had lectures that were based on the books and so kept us on schedule. I would read a bunch on weekends if I was off, and as much as I could during the week. Didn't set a hard and fast goal per-se.

Second year I focused less on the BCSC books (since I had already read them) and focused more on questions, review books and my notes. Third year I studied even less, trying to simulate a realistic study schedule that I would need to study for the real boards during a busy retina fellowship the following year.

The above worked for me but everyone is different.
 
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billambeer

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I meant this one:

http://www.amazon.com/Review-Questions-Ophthalmology-Question-Answer/dp/0781752035/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1361230452&sr=1-2&keywords=chern+ophthalmology

Chern isn't a Q book. At least not this one: http://www.amazon.com/Ophthalmology-Review-Manual-Kenneth-Chern/dp/1608310078

That's why i was confused because Friedman and Chern are basically the same text, except it looks like Friedman is a little more detailed. At least, that's what I've found looking here http://www.amazon.com/Review-Ophthalmology-Expert-Consult-Online/dp/0721687768

That's why I thought Tamesis and Friedman would compliment well. TL;DR right?
 

ophthope

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1. billambeer you are a baller, and your post makes me very glad that I matched into a program that already has some set out course for residents to read through BCSC

2. Everybody else - if there was ONE RESOURCE I could devour during the rest of M4/Intern year. One thing that I could read or listen to or learn that would make studying during PGY2 year easier, what would it be? Is there such a resource that will lay some groundwork and make the learning curve less steep that first Ophtho year?
Any advice on my question #2 from above? I've woken up barely before noon for the last two months and if I don't find something to do my brain muscle is going to atrophy. Every fun side project I wanted to do is finished. I watched all the shows I wanted to watch. My video game back log is completed. I'm out of things to do and I'm about to go crazy. Direct me to a resource to read, oh wise ones of Ophthalmology!
 

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Any advice on my question #2 from above? I've woken up barely before noon for the last two months and if I don't find something to do my brain muscle is going to atrophy. Every fun side project I wanted to do is finished. I watched all the shows I wanted to watch. My video game back log is completed. I'm out of things to do and I'm about to go crazy. Direct me to a resource to read, oh wise ones of Ophthalmology!
There will be plenty of time to read ophtho books. Date someone, travel, spend a day golfing. Enjoy 4th year while it lasts because intern year is a whole different story.
 

ophthope

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There will be plenty of time to read ophtho books. Date someone, travel, spend a day golfing. Enjoy 4th year while it lasts because intern year is a whole different story.
Date someone? My wife's fears have come true, you immoral doctors are pushing me to become lecherous. On the other hand I'd love to travel. I'll PM you my address so that you can mail me a check and as soon as it's cashed I'll be off. No money for that left after the Ophthalmology interview season. :laugh:
 

RestoreSight

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Date someone? My wife's fears have come true, you immoral doctors are pushing me to become lecherous. On the other hand I'd love to travel. I'll PM you my address so that you can mail me a check and as soon as it's cashed I'll be off. No money for that left after the Ophthalmology interview season. :laugh:
Einstein said "problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them.” Think outside the box. Don't spend your last carefree days of med school reading ophtho text books. You have all of intern year to be a gunner.
 

ophthope

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Einstein said "problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them.” Think outside the box. Don't spend your last carefree days of med school reading ophtho text books. You have all of intern year to be a gunner.
To be blunt I will have a new small child in my house right about the time PGY-2 year starts. I appreciate the advice, but I have a lot of time now that I just simply won't have then. A little extra work now while I can do it leisurely in between watching sitcoms will hopefully make some difference then when I will be so crunched for time. I know myself, and if I can at least get a foothold of understanding it will make the studying easier when I have no choice about doing it or not. Just trying to make it easier on myself in the future.

And don't be absurd, there's no way I'm doing any gunning intern year. Does anybody really do that? I've certainly never met an ophtho prelim year gunner. Everyone says to do your work, go home, and enjoy your time off. Sorry if it's different where you are. If anyone has a real suggestion here I'm still open. If not I'm just going to read the fundamentals and principles of ophtho bcsc book and practical ophthalmology.
 

RestoreSight

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To be blunt I will have a new small child in my house right about the time PGY-2 year starts. I appreciate the advice, but I have a lot of time now that I just simply won't have then. A little extra work now while I can do it leisurely in between watching sitcoms will hopefully make some difference then when I will be so crunched for time. I know myself, and if I can at least get a foothold of understanding it will make the studying easier when I have no choice about doing it or not. Just trying to make it easier on myself in the future.

And don't be absurd, there's no way I'm doing any gunning intern year. Does anybody really do that? I've certainly never met an ophtho prelim year gunner. Everyone says to do your work, go home, and enjoy your time off. Sorry if it's different where you are. If anyone has a real suggestion here I'm still open. If not I'm just going to read the fundamentals and principles of ophtho bcsc book and practical ophthalmology.
Be blunt all you want, it doesn't matter to me. Spend your 4th year reading ophtho books all you want and do nothing intern year. Your retention will be poor and your takeaway will be near zero. Here's a suggestion: match in a cush intern year program and get ahead by preparing for your PGY-2 then. That's the suggestion from every senior resident I have spoken to from every top program. Get STEP 3 done early, and spend your free time reading BCSC. There is so much free time during a cush intern year its an excellent time to get ahead. I have completed 2 clinical ophtho electives, 1 research elective in ocular pathology and submitted two manuscripts from 4th year and two new case reports. In regards to reading BCSC, even a few pages a day will prepare you well. And yes, this is the best advice available. BCSC is where the OKAP questions come from and it should be your primary text. Add on a question bank to test yourself. Just a few questions a day is all that's necessary. You seem to act like you know everything, but take this advice from a resident who matched at the #1 program in the country and who is completing probably the easiest TY year available: Intern year is boring and sitting around doing nothing productive all year makes it almost unbearable.
 
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billambeer

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I second your opinion on studying in the PGY 1 year. I've heard a lot of gunner residents saying they did some prep toward the end and that it helped a lot in PGY 2.

I do have to say though, I've started to read Kanski (I'm MSIV) and it has given me some new insights I probably wouldn't have had. I do think I'll probably forget all of it as you suggest, but it has augmented some of my current coursework and I would say it has been a net benefit. Of course, I'm only on lids (the first section) and it seems like there is a high degree of systemic correlates. maybe by the time I get to orbit or something it won't seem as relevant.
 
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billambeer

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This thread should go in the SDN hall of fame.
right? it started out as my honest attempt to plan ahead, then to bashing the obsessed one, then to honest discourse about which things to add and subtract from my regimen, then to "---- you dude"

so weird.
 

JMK2005

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Dont bother studying ophth pgy1. Waste of time for me. Try to get an ophth elective toward the end of internship or start studying last 2 months.

Worry about step 3 and enjoy life as an intern. You have plenty of time to learn ophtho.
 
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billambeer

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Dont bother studying ophth pgy1. Waste of time for me. Try to get an ophth elective toward the end of internship or start studying last 2 months.

Worry about step 3 and enjoy life as an intern. You have plenty of time to learn ophtho.
would you say the same thing for someone who wants a top fellowship or ASOPRS?

Obviously fellowship match is a horse race ("I'll take your cornea fellow if you take my ASOPRS"), I'm most concerned that I won't have the knowledge base to impress my department chair and other ASOPRS faculty when it comes time for application season. that part of my overall brand I can control closely, whereas my 'fun'/interpersonal side (whatever you call it) is kind of random.

help me calm my mind :)
 

JMK2005

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Are you doing a surgical internship?
Did you match at a program with an ASOPRS fellowship?
 

JMK2005

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The most important thing for ASOPRS is connections. Good OKAPs help, but it's a different game than med school match.

Put your time in getting projects done and making connections. Study as well, but that is lower priority.
 

ophthope

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You seem to act like you know everything, but take this advice from a resident who matched at the #1 program in the country...
Good gosh! Look man, I appreciate the advice but I definitely don't act like I know everything. That's why I'm asking for some advice here. What I do know is how I personally learn best and what my particular situation is in life right now. I have various reasons that I can't move anywhere to do a cush intern year. If I could have done one, I would have because the advice you're giving is the same advice I've heard. My situation is not the same as most residents', and it just doesn't fit for me. You could have just said "I still recommend not reading during your fourth year but if you're going to do it start on the BCSC." It would've saved you a lot of time. The only reason I've had to continually ask for a suggestion here is because instead of either answering my question or simply not posting you continue to interject unsolicited advice.

I might give the BCSC fundamentals book a shot since from what I could glean from that post you recommend primarily BCSC. But I got some advice from someone out here in the real world to try Kanski Clinical Ophthalmology so I might do that plus it sounds like billambeer has found it to be useful as well. Thanks billambeer for that information.
 
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