• SDN Site Updates

    Hey everyone! The site will be down for approximately 2 hours on Thursday, August 5th for site updates.

  • How To ACE Your Medical School Interview

    In this webinar hosted by SDN with experts from BeMo Academic Consulting, you will learn a simple five-step process to help you translate your interview invitation into an acceptance.

baobao

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jan 24, 2006
29
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
:confused: I heard that for the new grad is only 70000 yearly if you are the associate. Is that the pretty common?
 

armorshell

One Man Freak Show
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2006
7,173
257
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
The place I worked had a starting salary for new graduates of 70 + 12% of production minus 50% lab fees. Most place do ~100 I believe.
 

shamrock2006

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Oct 9, 2006
802
2
Nowhere and Everywhere
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
I would say that's pretty common. Yes dentists do make good money, well over 100k..even associates..and that # is likely to go up in the coming years. But I think it's probably pretty rare that you'll make 100k+ fresh out of school. You simply do not have the proficiency, the experience, and the speed for an established dentist to pay you that kind of money. You'll probably start somewhere in the 80k range i'd say, or if you're lucky 90k range (which is still good money dont get me wrong)....but IMO, you have to earn your way to that sweet salary, it wont just be given to you right out of d-school.
 
About the Ads

afrosheen

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 5, 2006
126
1
Status (Visible)
six figures in Cali. i guarantee you that livin in the yay
 

PlanB21

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 30, 2006
92
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Dental
In Florida, the norm is usually around 100-120K from what 3 dentists told me. Some dentists do 500 dollars a day guaranteed. Some dentists do 35% take home of whatever you produce every month. 70-80K I guess is after the 30% income tax. Mvoing to a smaller town will also up your chances of getting paid more out of school, but i would rather take a pay cut than live in a country hicktown:thumbup:
 

aphistis

Full Member
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Feb 15, 2003
8,394
37
Indianapolis
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
  2. Dentist
In Florida, the norm is usually around 100-120K from what 3 dentists told me. Some dentists do 500 dollars a day guaranteed. Some dentists do 35% take home of whatever you produce every month. 70-80K I guess is after the 30% income tax. Mvoing to a smaller town will also up your chances of getting paid more out of school, but i would rather take a pay cut than live in a country hicktown:thumbup:
You don't have to live there, just work there. ;)

But it's fine with me either way. I'll cheerfully do bread & butter dentistry on all the patients I can handle while you compete for cosmetic cases with three other dentists in your building alone. :)
 

Revelde

Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jun 30, 2006
261
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Dental
I believe military dentists do make a living of 70k(not 100% cash but including all the bonus and benefits) from the first year out of school.
 

darksky

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2007
95
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Dental
:confused: I heard that for the new grad is only 70000 yearly if you are the associate. Is that the pretty common?

i know a dentist w/ 10 yrs + experience works in a clinic, making 55 $ per hour.
dentists dont make any money. its a dirty job.
 

armorshell

One Man Freak Show
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2006
7,173
257
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
i know a dentist w/ 10 yrs + experience works in a clinic, making 55 $ per hour.
dentists dont make any money. its a dirty job.

I know a dentist with poor business sense and no ambition too! Small world! Or maybe even simpler, the guy just doesn't like dealing with the hassle of collecting from patients (assuming it's a public health clinic)

The money's there in dentistry, but like anything else in life you have to work for it.
 

lava890

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 18, 2006
102
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
i know a dentist w/ 10 yrs + experience works in a clinic, making 55 $ per hour.
dentists dont make any money. its a dirty job.

If it's a dirty job to you, why are you applying?
 

H2OPOLODENT

Full Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Aug 25, 2006
104
0
Los Angeles, CA
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
At least as a starting dentist, you will generally be paid based on how much you work/how many patients you see (% production). Maybe you make ~100k starting out as an associate, but at least you won't be working as much as the more established guys. Someone fresh out of law school making that much (or a little more) will be working like a dog.

The pediatric dentists I work for hired an associate about 3 years ago. She started out producing about $12k/month. At 30% production, she was taking home $3600/month. Not that much money. After building up her patient base, now she's producing about $50-60k/month, takehome: $15-18k/month. The top dogs in the practice are at about $80-90k/month. That's $24-36k/month (for a full working month, which is rare since they take so much vacation time).

In a practice structure like that, you get paid on volume. Yeah, salary may start low, but at least you're chillin with only a few patients each day.
 
About the Ads

darksky

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2007
95
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Dental
I know a dentist with poor business sense and no ambition too! Small world! Or maybe even simpler, the guy just doesn't like dealing with the hassle of collecting from patients (assuming it's a public health clinic)

The money's there in dentistry, but like anything else in life you have to work for it.

hey big men
would you work in dentistry for 20$ per hour ???
 

Dental Dork 09

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Jan 24, 2007
90
0
Status (Visible)
5 of my upper classman friends have jobs setup with a salary but all have a bonus system built in.

Range is: 98k-120k + bonus
 

darksky

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2007
95
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Dental
I know a dentist with poor business sense and no ambition too! Small world! Or maybe even simpler, the guy just doesn't like dealing with the hassle of collecting from patients (assuming it's a public health clinic)

The money's there in dentistry, but like anything else in life you have to work for it.

i know a dentist works for a free dental clinic that serves the underserved population. the dentist makes 55$ per hour. there are very few dentists would want to work for a charity organization. i pay great respect to this dentist because the dentist wants to help people who needs help.
 

DDSY

Bright Lights at Night
10+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2006
1,114
4
United States
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Dental
i know a dentist works for a free dental clinic that serves the underserved population. the dentist makes 55$ per hour. there are very few dentists would want to work for a charity organization. i pay great respect to this dentist because the dentist wants to help people who needs help.

I know a dentist who earns so much less than that. He is a dentist from a foreign country and works as a taxicab driver. :eek: :eek: :idea: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
 

OceanBlue

HA! I knew it.
10+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2007
508
1
South
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
you can go as high as 140k-150k...fresh out of school in North Carolina. Texas you can start out around 120-130k. I'm pretty sure i'm going to get my own practice when I go out. It is a bit more risky...but life sucks without risks. Got a couple of friends buying their own practices when they came out...they did very well for themselves. I'm just trying to learn a couple of things from them.
 

armorshell

One Man Freak Show
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2006
7,173
257
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
you can go as high as 140k-150k...fresh out of school in North Carolina. Texas you can start out around 120-130k. I'm pretty sure i'm going to get my own practice when I go out. It is a bit more risky...but life sucks without risks. Got a couple of friends buying their own practices when they came out...they did very well for themselves. I'm just trying to learn a couple of things from them.

Same idea here, perhaps associate or GPR for a year or two to both scout out locations and build up some speed/skill
 

OceanBlue

HA! I knew it.
10+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2007
508
1
South
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
Same idea here, perhaps associate or GPR for a year or two to both scout out locations and build up some speed/skill

Good idea! But I think you can use those two years to build your own patient pool, and you can build up your speed/skills as you work in your own practice. The thing about about starting out fresh is that you have to know a lot of things (business wise) prior to the day that you just come out of dental school. It's very doable because i've seen it with my own eyes.
 
About the Ads

shamrock2006

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Oct 9, 2006
802
2
Nowhere and Everywhere
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
you can go as high as 140k-150k...fresh out of school in North Carolina. Texas you can start out around 120-130k. I'm pretty sure i'm going to get my own practice when I go out. It is a bit more risky...but life sucks without risks. Got a couple of friends buying their own practices when they came out...they did very well for themselves. I'm just trying to learn a couple of things from them.

Wow...they are probably in astronomical levels of debt..and will be for many many many years. I couldn't even imagine buying my own place right out of school...but then again, i'm going military so I wouldnt know...it'll be nice after 4+ yrs having zero debt and buttloads of experience under my belt.
 

armorshell

One Man Freak Show
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2006
7,173
257
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
Wow...they are probably in astronomical levels of debt..and will be for many many many years. I couldn't even imagine buying my own place right out of school...but then again, i'm going military so I wouldnt know...it'll be nice after 4+ yrs having zero debt and buttloads of experience under my belt.

Debt is relative. Owning their own practice they should be making a lot more money.
 

shamrock2006

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Oct 9, 2006
802
2
Nowhere and Everywhere
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
Debt is relative. Owning their own practice they should be making a lot more money.[/QUOTE

True, but my only issue with that is getting the patient base to make that money. I mean, unless you have a complete monopoly on the area, I can't imagine many people are going to feel all that comfortable going to a practice owned by a fresh d-school grad. Plus, business skills will be lacking...you have payrolls, start up costs, etc...not to mention personal expenses..mortages, car payments, insurance, etc...and if you have a family..yikes. My parents own a veterinary clinic and i know first hand how much of a pain in the a$$ it still is and my dad has been in practice for 25 yrs. He didn't get his own place until 10 yrs after he graduated. Yes DVM is different from DDS...but the same basic principles of owning a practice apply. So yes, I agree debt is relative...but for me its hard to overlook ~200k (at least) debt from dschool..then the ginormous loan to take out to start your practice..all to take the risk of starting a practice fresh out of school. I mean if you can pull it off, sweet deal, more power to you. I just think you have invested too much in your education to risk it that soon.
 

armorshell

One Man Freak Show
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2006
7,173
257
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
Remember, a lot of these people aren't breaking ground on a brand new office, they're doing practice transitions. They're buying into already established patient pools, and often the selling doctor stays on for a few years as an associate to make the transition smooth.
 

4thQtrDreams

Good times, for a change.
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2004
455
0
San Francisco
www.predents.com
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
My friend graduated then associated for 2 years and then opened up his own practice in midtown Manhattan this past August. Yes, there are at least 20 other dentist in the same building, and even 1 other dentist in the shared office space, yet there seems to be an instant patient pool.. he works at his office 3 days a week and is an associate at his old location for 1 day.

I work at his office on Saturdays and it really is amazing how swamped he is considering that it has been open for only 7 months. He has even hired a hygienist who is booked solid for weeks. its an average 2-3 week wait to get in for an appointment.. Very encouraging.. I dont ask too much about finances of it all, but his 1st year out i believe he made $140k and is on pace to make 240k at his office in its 1st year.
 

darksky

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2007
95
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Dental
i urge you all new grad to strive for higher cause that is to give back to your community by working for a free dental clinic.
 

OceanBlue

HA! I knew it.
10+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2007
508
1
South
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
Wow...they are probably in astronomical levels of debt..and will be for many many many years. I couldn't even imagine buying my own place right out of school...but then again, i'm going military so I wouldnt know...it'll be nice after 4+ yrs having zero debt and buttloads of experience under my belt.

I don't know if this helps....one of them told me paying back is not a problem. They didn't go to a cheap school either...they went to tufts. However, when they first started out, they worked 5-6 days a week. They just started out and i went there, their patients were literary lining up outside of their practices.
 
About the Ads

OceanBlue

HA! I knew it.
10+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2007
508
1
South
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
[/quote]True, but my only issue with that is getting the patient base to make that money. I mean, unless you have a complete monopoly on the area, I can't imagine many people are going to feel all that comfortable going to a practice owned by a fresh d-school grad. Plus, business skills will be lacking...you have payrolls, start up costs, etc...not to mention personal expenses..mortages, car payments, insurance, etc...and if you have a family..yikes. My parents own a veterinary clinic and i know first hand how much of a pain in the a$$ it still is and my dad has been in practice for 25 yrs. He didn't get his own place until 10 yrs after he graduated. Yes DVM is different from DDS...but the same basic principles of owning a practice apply. So yes, I agree debt is relative...but for me its hard to overlook ~200k (at least) debt from dschool..then the ginormous loan to take out to start your practice..all to take the risk of starting a practice fresh out of school. I mean if you can pull it off, sweet deal, more power to you. I just think you have invested too much in your education to risk it that soon.[/quote]

not the same as a dental clinic. Just don't go crazy with the new digital technologies when you first came out. Buy things in bulk. Don't go with brand names. Some people have family members to help out at the front desk...etc...etc...
~yes, i am awared of the comments that were posted by some of the SDN dentists when I wrote what i wrote.
 

JamieMac

Elite Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jul 7, 2005
356
1
Royal Oak
www.facebook.com
Status (Visible)
Debt is relative. Owning their own practice they should be making a lot more money.

Agreed, but there is a learning curve to any business venture, and dentistry is no exception. Based on what I've been told, most d-schools do not focus on the business aspect of running a practice. Having owned two businesses of my own, I can tell you that many that just jump right in will face much higher stress levels compared to those doing a year or two working as an associate. Spending a year or two to get your bearings (and save a little cash) would be a better choice for most.
 

shamrock2006

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Oct 9, 2006
802
2
Nowhere and Everywhere
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
True, but my only issue with that is getting the patient base to make that money. I mean, unless you have a complete monopoly on the area, I can't imagine many people are going to feel all that comfortable going to a practice owned by a fresh d-school grad. Plus, business skills will be lacking...you have payrolls, start up costs, etc...not to mention personal expenses..mortages, car payments, insurance, etc...and if you have a family..yikes. My parents own a veterinary clinic and i know first hand how much of a pain in the a$$ it still is and my dad has been in practice for 25 yrs. He didn't get his own place until 10 yrs after he graduated. Yes DVM is different from DDS...but the same basic principles of owning a practice apply. So yes, I agree debt is relative...but for me its hard to overlook ~200k (at least) debt from dschool..then the ginormous loan to take out to start your practice..all to take the risk of starting a practice fresh out of school. I mean if you can pull it off, sweet deal, more power to you. I just think you have invested too much in your education to risk it that soon.[/quote]

not the same as a dental clinic. Just don't go crazy with the new digital technologies when you first came out. Buy things in bulk. Don't go with brand names. Some people have family members to help out at the front desk...etc...etc...
~yes, i am awared of the comments that was posted by some of the SDN dentists when I wrote what i wrote.[/QUOTE]



Yes, I'm aware a vet clinic and a dental clinic are different. I said further on that DVM is not the same as DDS. However, my father, my dentist and I often spend time together..and I can tell you they agree 100% that the start up costs for any small healthcare practice are the same (which is why they tell me they think i've made a smart choice by going on a military scholarship)...despite the profession. Many vet clinics have high tech gizmos as well. My point was, it's not easy, and in many ways not very logical, to just jump in and start a practice....I agree with armorshell, you should transition if you're looking to one day have your own place. Or at least just work in an office for a few years to build up your skills, save some dinero, then get the ball rolling.
 

armorshell

One Man Freak Show
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2006
7,173
257
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
Agreed, but there is a learning curve to any business venture, and dentistry is no exception. Based on what I've been told, most d-schools do not focus on the business aspect of running a practice. Having owned two businesses of my own, I can tell you that many that just jump right in will face much higher stress levels compared to those doing a year or two working as an associate. Spending a year or two to get your bearings (and save a little cash) would be a better choice for most.

I definitely agree, and as I posted above that's exactly what I plan to do. I'm certainly not going to have enough time to learn how to run a business in dental school, and during my first few years out I'm going to do just that (while building up my skills,!)
 

zebrafish

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 3, 2007
115
1
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
I definitely agree, and as I posted above that's exactly what I plan to do. I'm certainly not going to have enough time to learn how to run a business in dental school, and during my first few years out I'm going to do just that (while building up my skills,!)
Or you can be buisness savy, maybe take some buisness classes before you get your DDS or DMS and if you lucky find someone who is willing to finance you practice or at least co-sign. I don't think that it is impossible to start a year out of school. I know some people who have done it and are very sucessful. It helps though if you have friends or family with money to finance your cause;) .
 

armorshell

One Man Freak Show
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2006
7,173
257
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
Or you can be buisness savy, maybe take some buisness classes before you get your DDS or DMS and if you lucky find someone who is willing to finance you practice or at least co-sign. I don't think that it is impossible to start a year out of school. I know some people who have done it and are very sucessful. It helps though if you have friends or family with money to finance your cause;) .

That's definitely an option if you've got the gift. I happen to not be particularly business saavy ;)
 

zebrafish

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 3, 2007
115
1
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
That's definitely an option if you've got the gift. I happen to not be particularly business saavy ;)
Hey don't discredit yourself...if your smart enough to get into Dental school, buisness is not as hard. Read up and you'll be great. It all comes down to cutting cost without comprimising your service, good advertising and crunching #'s...HAVE FAITH in yourself!:D
 

UJ007

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 16, 2007
270
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
That's definitely an option if you've got the gift. I happen to not be particularly business saavy ;)

I think ppl with science degrees (and high enough marks to get into d-school nonetheless) are more than capable of learning anything ppl in business programs learn. You just gotta be willing to invest the time and take some risk and i'm sure it will payoff.
 

zebrafish

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 3, 2007
115
1
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
I think ppl with science degrees (and high enough marks to get into d-school nonetheless) are more than capable of learning anything ppl in business programs learn. You just gotta be willing to invest the time and take some risk and i'm sure it will payoff.
I AGREE!!!! now don't get me wrong, not all buisness is easy, (my spouse is a finance major) there can be some pretty complicated formulas involved, however even if a practive grosses 1.5 million that is still a small buisness; with the right advisors or education we should all be able to manage.
 

ItsGavinC

Full Member
Moderator Emeritus
15+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2001
11,748
19
Arizona
Status (Visible)
  1. Dentist
but then again, i'm going military so I wouldnt know...it'll be nice after 4+ yrs having zero debt and buttloads of experience under my belt.

It's also nice having ones own practice right after graduating, not having to report to anybody else, and making 2-3x more than military dentists.

Who comes out ahead in this game? It all depends on what you value.
 

ItsGavinC

Full Member
Moderator Emeritus
15+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2001
11,748
19
Arizona
Status (Visible)
  1. Dentist
Just don't go crazy with the new digital technologies when you first came out. [/QUOTE]

Yeah, don't do that, because those digital thingies don't stand any chance of helping your patients better understand your tx. plan and dx. :rolleyes:
 

armorshell

One Man Freak Show
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Apr 13, 2006
7,173
257
Status (Visible)
  1. Non-Student
Isn't the ADA mandating that all practices be digital by 2015?

By the time we graduate we might as well go digital anyway...and besides by then it will probably be both cheaper and more commonplace.
 

OceanBlue

HA! I knew it.
10+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2007
508
1
South
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
Just don't go crazy with the new digital technologies when you first came out.

Yeah, don't do that, because those digital thingies don't stand any chance of helping your patients better understand your tx. plan and dx. :rolleyes:[/quote]


hey man! if you got the money then go with it. The more you're using money from the bank to get those expensive equipments, the more you have to pay back WITH INTEREST! What I heard from folks who started out successfully...they've been telling me the same things over and over again. Once you're set, then you can go digital and all of that if you want. This is just my opinion buddy. I know the type of neighborhood where i'm going to be working in and I can tell you that those patients probably don't care much about digital technologies. All they want to know are 2 things: 1) is it going to hurt 2) how much will it cost? Maybe you can roll differently...........
 

shamrock2006

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Oct 9, 2006
802
2
Nowhere and Everywhere
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
It's also nice having ones own practice right after graduating, not having to report to anybody else, and making 2-3x more than military dentists.

Who comes out ahead in this game? It all depends on what you value.

I guess so...I didn't decide to go military b/c of not having debt. I'm doing it b/c it's something that runs in my family and I know exactly what it has to offer. As I said before, if you can swing having your own place right out of school...then that's awesome, I hope it works out for the best. I simply think that all the "money" that can be made tends to blind a lot of students to all the crap that is to follow post d-school. I just think people tend to get ahead of themselves. and I understand you'll be making 2-3x that of a military dentist, but come four years from now most still will probably be in the 6 figure debt range...on top of other expenses. But like I said, if you can deal with all that...then more power to you. I hope you have nothing but success......Plus, i've spoken to many other dentists who always tell me that wish they would have gone military..b/c many of their professional friends who have done that came out and were getting all kinds of offers to buy into fantastic practices..and could do so b/c they had no school debts, and tons of experience...so there are both sides. I'm not saying military is the best way to go...it's just the best way to go for me.
 

JamieMac

Elite Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jul 7, 2005
356
1
Royal Oak
www.facebook.com
Status (Visible)
Or you can be business savvy, maybe take some business classes before you get your DDS or DMS and if you lucky find someone who is willing to finance you practice or at least co-sign.

Possessing business savvy is vastly different from just taking a few business classes prior to finishing d-school. Some are naturals and can pick up things very quickly, while others will need to rely on a key employee (office manager) to assist them with running/building a practice. I have a business degree with majors in finance and accounting...and I found that many who are teaching haven't actually "been" in business. They can teach and test you on theory all day long, but being "out there" is very different. I utilized as much of my education as possible, but I actually learned much more just being in business.

The best education that you can receive is by working for someone who is successful at what they do (in practicing and business management). If you keep your eyes and ears open while there, it will be the best paid education that you can get. Trust me...don't reinvent the wheel. For this reason alone, I plan to work for someone for a full year prior to obtaining my own practice. Best of luck!
 

JamieMac

Elite Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jul 7, 2005
356
1
Royal Oak
www.facebook.com
Status (Visible)
I think ppl with science degrees (and high enough marks to get into d-school nonetheless) are more than capable of learning anything ppl in business programs learn. You just gotta be willing to invest the time and take some risk and i'm sure it will payoff.

You might be right about the "learning" part, BUT the part you omitted is the applying part. Being in business has its challenges...many of which you will not learn about in any classroom. Many dentists are good at what they do, but due to poor business management, have a difficult time enjoying the fruits of their labor. I can assure you that being really smart doesn't provide a free ticket to running a successful business. If you acknowledge your strengths, weaknesses, and limitations, and find ways to balance them in a business model, it will allow you to maximize your potential as a <fill in the blank>. Good luck!
 

UJ007

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 16, 2007
270
0
Status (Visible)
  1. Dental Student
You might be right about the "learning" part, BUT the part you omitted is the applying part. Being in business has its challenges...many of which you will not learn about in any classroom. Many dentists are good at what they do, but due to poor business management, have a difficult time enjoying the fruits of their labor. I can assure you that being really smart doesn't provide a free ticket to running a successful business. If you acknowledge your strengths, weaknesses, and limitations, and find ways to balance them in a business model, it will allow you to maximize your potential as a <fill in the blank>. Good luck!

What i meant by my post was that if people are smart/hard working etc to obtain entrance to dental school they can learn not just theory about business but also how to apply it in real life. I just don't think that having a good business sense is something innate that you either have or don't have. I think you acquire it through learning and experience.
 
About the Ads
This thread is more than 14 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.