drsmirty

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Hi,
I just came across this site by accident and noticed how different your system is to the UK one. Hoping someone could satisfy a couple of my curiousities!
How many medical schools can you apply to? we can only apply to 4 here and each of you seem to be applying to loads.
Also, in the Uk we normally apply straight after we finish high school, is it the same in the US as i heard you had to university or something for a couple of years?
I also have never heard of osteopathic/allopathic, what's the difference?

Thanks peeps and good luck with your applications!
 

Brain

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drsmirty said:
Hi,
I just came across this site by accident and noticed how different your system is to the UK one. Hoping someone could satisfy a couple of my curiousities!
How many medical schools can you apply to? we can only apply to 4 here and each of you seem to be applying to loads.
Also, in the Uk we normally apply straight after we finish high school, is it the same in the US as i heard you had to university or something for a couple of years?
I also have never heard of osteopathic/allopathic, what's the difference?

Thanks peeps and good luck with your applications!
You can apply to as many med schools as you want in the US. I think the average applicant applies to 11.

Most med schools require a college degree to get in.

Osteopathic and allopathic physians are pretty similar. They just have a slightly different philosophy and osteopathic physicians are trained in something called osteopathic manipulative medicine. Hope this answers your questions
 

no exit

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drsmirty said:
Hi,
I just came across this site by accident and noticed how different your system is to the UK one. Hoping someone could satisfy a couple of my curiousities!
How many medical schools can you apply to? we can only apply to 4 here and each of you seem to be applying to loads.
Also, in the Uk we normally apply straight after we finish high school, is it the same in the US as i heard you had to university or something for a couple of years?
I also have never heard of osteopathic/allopathic, what's the difference?

Thanks peeps and good luck with your applications!
you can apply to all of the allopathic and osteopathic schools if you care to... it costs money to do so however..

you can apply to a seven or eight year program after high school, but the majority of applicants apply after earning a four year degree (you can apply and be accepted after your third year).

allopaths consitute the majority of physicians in the US. other than that, there are few differences between an allopath and an osteopath who finish the same residency.
 
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Scottish Chap

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Aug 3, 2003
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drsmirty said:
Hi,
I just came across this site by accident and noticed how different your system is to the UK one. Hoping someone could satisfy a couple of my curiousities!
How many medical schools can you apply to? we can only apply to 4 here and each of you seem to be applying to loads.
Also, in the Uk we normally apply straight after we finish high school, is it the same in the US as i heard you had to university or something for a couple of years?
I also have never heard of osteopathic/allopathic, what's the difference?

Thanks peeps and good luck with your applications!
Were you Intending to apply or are you just curious? I was educated in the U.K. and was recently accepted at a U.S. medical school. I'm very familiar with both systems. There are several hurdles for internationals. Feel free to pm me if you would like to chat. Best of luck! :thumbup:
 

freaker

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It's also worth noting that you can major in which ever subject you choose as an undergraduate (or several subjects, for that matter) before going to medical school in the US. Actually, English and history majors have higher acceptance rates than do biology majors.

There are still science requirements for getting into medical schools. Most US schools require 2 semesters of biology, 2 semesters of general chemistry, 2 semesters of organic chemistry, and 2 semesters of physics. Some also require credits in English, math (usually calculus), and biochemistry.

Probably 99% of US medical students have completed a 4-year degree program as an undergraduate, which you Brits call university and to which Americans generally refer to as college. A primary difference is that most universities in the US require students to take a variety of courses from numerous fields, which is usually done during the first two years. Thus, a student's schedule for a semester might consist of biology, economics, religion, history, and chemistry. This is a bit different than the English system, where students specialize from the beginning in their field of choice.

Osteopathic schools in the US usually take on a more wholistic approach to healing and are usually (though not rigidly) geared towards more general practice specialties. They are generally slightly less competitive than US allopathic schools, though the two degrees allow for equal professional freedom once one has attained a residency position.
 

FMGP8P

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Dec 15, 2004
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My english co-worker told me that the application process to get into a UK med school is much easier than in the United States. Apparently, there are no interviews and the grades and test scores determines which schools you can get into. I don't know if this is true or not and was hoping that you english folks could confirm this. If it is true, it sure would be less stressful to know that obtaining minimum requirements gaurentees a spot in med school.
 

Scottish Chap

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FMGP8P said:
My english co-worker told me that the application process to get into a UK med school is much easier than in the United States.
Not sure I'd agree with that. I've studied for four years at universities in both countries. Both systems are so entirely different that you cannot compare them very easily.

FMGP8P said:
Apparently, there are no interviews and the grades and test scores determines which schools you can get into.
From high school, there are generally no interviews (at least, in Scotland). However, the entrance exams are INSANELY difficult and the selection criteria is less subjective than the American medical school system which I found to be equallly thorough, but frighteningly arbitrary at some schools. British schools care more about grades and, interestingly, do not employ affirmitive action. I found the British university entrance exams harder than most exams I took at a British university.

To gain entry into medicine from high school in Scotland, you generally need AT LEAST AAABB in five "Scottish Higher" exams (chem/biol or phys/math/English and a language or social science or humanities subject) and these assess work over an entire year. Just to let you know how difficult they are: each exam is about five hours long and you 'only' need >70% for an 'A'....and that would be a C or less in many American universities. Also, unlike the SAT, ACT, or MCAT, it REALLY hurts you if you take the exam a second time - schools REALLLY care about how you do on your "first sitting" so, if you have a bad day, you're in BIG trouble. In England and Wales and parts of Ireland, applicants generally take three "A Level" subjects (assesses material over TWO years and in more depth than Scottish entrance exams). Most applicants need at least AAB in those exams to be eligible. A levels are probably as in-depth as 1st-2nd year subjects in an average American undergraduate school.

Several British universities are realizing that it's difficult for a person to know for sure that they want to be a doctor at the age of 16 or 17 and they are now opening up medical school places for people with undergraduate degrees. There is also an acute doctor shortage right now and this was thought to help alleviate the problem. Many British medical schools are now shortening their medical degree from 5 years to 4 years for graduates and some are even making the applicants take an entrance exam called the GAMSAT (not quite as hard or in-depth as the MCAT, but the structure is similar). I predict that British Universities will become more and more like the U.S. and Canada; that is, you will need an undergraduate degree before applying to medical school. The bottom line is this: two very different systems, two very different methods of selection for medical school, yet two successful systems for delivering medical care - each with their own strengths and weaknesses.
 

FMGP8P

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Thanks Scottish Chap

Your post was very informative.
 
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