samac

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Is a traffic violation a misdemeanor in your state? In mine it's just an infraction so didn't need to be reported, but all states are different
 
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If I get a ticket from my municipal government for not mowing my lawn because of city code, should I report that too?
 

IslandStyle808

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This is my opinion on the matter. If it is a misdemeanor, then it would be best to report it. A traffic infraction is different. If the school doesn't ask about traffic infractions, then it is not necessary to bring it up. The question to ask yourself is, "would this dilemma been the same if the incident happened before applications?" There was one secondary where I was actually asked about traffic infractions. So if you do get secondaries like this, then I believe it would be best to report it to the school.
 
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OrdinaryDO

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for individuals who receive a traffic violation after applying, do you have to alert AACOMAS or every individual school you submit a secondary to?? Or just the ones that ask in their secondaries?

I dont see anything on AACOMAS regarding updating a traffic violation unless one has been convicted of a misdemonor or felony. I have not been to court yet/convicted yet.
It doesn't matter if you add it or not, the ADCOMs will not give a hoot about a traffic violation. It would almost be unfair to factor that in since most states don't deem them as misdemeanors. My secondary applications specifically states to exclude all traffic violations when reporting your background criminal record and charges that applied to you.
 

dapdrow

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I would not report anything now because you have not been convicted of anything yet. If you need to update them after the fact, then so be it.
 
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IslandStyle808

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Concur with above. You need to let this play out first and then know what the final result is. Once this is known, then you need to inform the schools.
 

samac

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@samac @IslandStyle808 @OrdinaryDO : The violation is a misdemeanor if convicted. I have not been to court yet so I have only been charged with it. Do I report this now or after I have gone to court and been handed my verdict?

Anyone with knowledge or insight on this matter is much appreciated.
I would probably go on and inform them you have a a court date for a traffic violation and let that be that. Most schools won't care, but if it's a misdemeanor in your state I would want to be proactive and tell them before that's on my record. Most people lose traffic cases, so unless you have a legit reason it should be thrown out you probably won't win.
 
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A traffic violation is nothing to worry about, and if you did commit anything that was a criminal offense schools run background checks and they will find out about it anyway.
 

feeling-dizzy

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To put this to rest. I don't even remember how many traffic tickets I got, probably around 6 (for 12 years driving). I spread those across many states though. I only paid for those, never had to appear in court. I did not care to put them in my application because they are so minor as you live long enough to be a doctor, you probably will get one or two tickets in life time. Just dawn luck that one or few will get more than others (no, I'm not talking about DUI, just normal moving violation). Just because you want to be a doctor, does not mean you have to live perfect life. I don't think doctors any more superior being than a normal folk, and neither should you. So, chill.
 

mathnerd88

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To put this to rest. I don't even remember how many traffic tickets I got, probably around 6 (for 12 years driving). I spread those across many states though. I only paid for those, never had to appear in court. I did not care to put them in my application because they are so minor as you live long enough to be a doctor, you probably will get one or two tickets in life time. Just dawn luck that one or few will get more than others (no, I'm not talking about DUI, just normal moving violation). Just because you want to be a doctor, does not mean you have to live perfect life. I don't think doctors any more superior being than a normal folk, and neither should you. So, chill.
Out of state violations usually don't get reported to your home state, and usually don't show up in background checks. They don't even show up in driving records either and insurance companies don't usually know.
 
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http://www.dmv.org/articles/dealing-with-out-of-state-traffic-tickets/

44 states and the District of Columbia subscribe to the Driver License Compact (DLC), an interstate agreement used to exchange information on license suspensions and traffic violations by out-of-state drivers. Even non-participating states conform to the rules of the DLC, and there are similar compacts and agreements binding those states.

All of this makes it virtually impossible to receive a ticket out-of-state and not have your home state notified.
 
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mathnerd88

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http://www.dmv.org/articles/dealing-with-out-of-state-traffic-tickets/

44 states and the District of Columbia subscribe to the Driver License Compact (DLC), an interstate agreement used to exchange information on license suspensions and traffic violations by out-of-state drivers. Even non-participating states conform to the rules of the DLC, and there are similar compacts and agreements binding those states.

All of this makes it virtually impossible to receive a ticket out-of-state and not have your home state notified.
Yeah that's what I thought too...until I got into an at-fault accident out of state and a police report was filed and my insurance and state driving record never found out.

My friend got tickets out of state and they were never reported. The DLC is actually a loose term, and states generally won't report out of state.
 

oOKawaiiOo

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Ok, so anybody (doctor or not) raise your hand if you drive 6+ years and not ever receive a traffic ticket!!! Anybody?
I've been legally driving since I was 16 years of age, 11 years. 260,XXX miles on my 96 Honda accord.

No accidents, no traffic violations except for 3 parking tickets.

1st: My first time downtown for a lawyer intern, $40 dollars.
2nd: Late for a night class during undergrad. Thought the meter was free after 6 PM, this meter wasnt. I wrote a letter to appeal, and school dropped the ticket:thumbup:
3rd: On my way to the clubs. Traffic was at a dead stop, and I was within walking distance to the club. I was aware that I parked in an illegal space and played my luck. $50 parking ticket.
 

dapdrow

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To put this to rest. I don't even remember how many traffic tickets I got, probably around 6 (for 12 years driving). I spread those across many states though. I only paid for those, never had to appear in court. I did not care to put them in my application because they are so minor as you live long enough to be a doctor, you probably will get one or two tickets in life time. Just dawn luck that one or few will get more than others (no, I'm not talking about DUI, just normal moving violation). Just because you want to be a doctor, does not mean you have to live perfect life. I don't think doctors any more superior being than a normal folk, and neither should you. So, chill.
I have a ticket that if I pay, I get six points on my license automatically. (Speeding.) So I am trying for court anyway, even though I'll probably lose. First and only time I have been pulled over thus far and I was heading to work. To be fair, I was in blood bank that day and we had bleeders all week---and of course as soon as I walked in the door someone said, "THEY JUST PUT IN TWO ORDERS FOR BLOOD ON TWO PATIENTS." I feel like one of them might've even had an antibody. So that's my excuse. ;)

Since then I have stopped being so anxious to get to work on time.