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transition metals

Discussion in 'MCAT Study Question Q&A' started by pepocho, 05.19.14.

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  1. pepocho

    pepocho 2+ Year Member

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    Last edited: 04.11.16
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  3. tdod

    tdod 2+ Year Member

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    No, you absolutely do not need to know transition metals

    you must know that, in order:
    elementals have an oxidation # of 0
    F, in a compound has an oxidation of –1
    H has an oxidation of +1, unless bound to metals
    O has an oxiation of –2, unless its a peroxide, in which case it is –1.

    should probably also know that alkali and alkaline earth metals are usu. +1 and +2
     
  4. Czarcasm

    Czarcasm Hakuna matata, no worries. 2+ Year Member

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    If you remember the ranking order of oxidation states, you should be fine.
     
  5. pepocho

    pepocho 2+ Year Member

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    Last edited: 04.11.16
  6. Teleologist

    Teleologist 2+ Year Member

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    Meh, useless. If you had realized that oxidation numbers were simply a formalism holding that all bonds were ionic, then you would simply be able to use electronegativity considerations to assign oxidation numbers. A lot easier than memorizing arbitrary rules. EN considerations easily explain why oxygen has an oxidation state of -2 and -1 instead in peroxides. EN considerations also explain any other oxidation state without your having to memorize a single rule. You'll forget a rule before I screw up an electronegativity consideration. There is no "most" or "usually" or "sometimes" rules with EN; EN always wins because it's the underlying concept in assigning oxidation numbers.
     
  7. tdod

    tdod 2+ Year Member

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    i never said anything about memorization or understanding. i just answered his question.
     

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