Jul 9, 2015
8
1
24
New York
Status
Pre-Veterinary
I go to a university known for it's research and was looking to take advantage of it. I met with a professor today who specializes in genetics and physiology and spoke to him about research opportunities. He said it would be difficult for me to get hands on experience with animals but I can start with research on the molecular level. Do you think this would be beneficial to me as a future veterinarian? I have a week to decide whether or not to do the research. Thanks!
 

Despoina

Future Guinea Pig Hoarder
Jul 24, 2015
23
9
Status
Pre-Veterinary
I'm not sure if I'm the best to answer this BUT I am a LVT working in animal research at the moment so I thought I'll drop my 2 cent. There are animal users that work with animals in my facility but they are under the PI, primary investigator's lab and not under Veterinary services. Also according to VMCAS, research based is considered "Research experience" and not veterinary experience (which is something a lot of places require). I don't think that research experience will hurt, if you are aiming to specialize in the research route, but I think your time can be better spent in a field that maybe you want to specialize in or so? Hope this helps!! :)
 

wheelin2vetmed

CSU c/o 2021
2+ Year Member
Jun 6, 2015
1,024
3,205
Exactly where I was sitting 5 minutes ago.
Status
Veterinary Student
I go to a university known for it's research and was looking to take advantage of it. I met with a professor today who specializes in genetics and physiology and spoke to him about research opportunities. He said it would be difficult for me to get hands on experience with animals but I can start with research on the molecular level. Do you think this would be beneficial to me as a future veterinarian? I have a week to decide whether or not to do the research. Thanks!
You should take advantage of any opportunity to get in at a true laboratory setting. I think it's not so much the animal portion that matters, but being around a research environment running protocols, working with equipment, etc.

I've been at a cancer biology lab at my university for a year and a half now and can run/analyze/conduct PCR, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, DNA electrophoresis, 3D cell culture, immunocytochemistry, etc on my own, things I would have never learned in a 1-unit genetics or biology lab.

Nonetheless, my favorite part is sending picture messages to my friends while at the lab with captions like: "Cooking up some good meth today."
 

Caiter92

2+ Year Member
Apr 1, 2015
4,762
7,432
Status
Veterinary Student
You should take advantage of any opportunity to get in at a true laboratory setting. I think it's not so much the animal portion that matters, but being around a research environment running protocols, working with equipment, etc.
Agreed. My undergrad research had nothing to do with vetmed (plant microbiology lab). I joined the lab before I had began to pursue vetmed, but I really enjoyed my time there and am thankful for the opportunity. I actually wrote about it in my PS. I was really fortunate to be working directly under the PI and on my own projects instead of with grad students like most of my friends.

Nonetheless, my favorite part is sending picture messages to my friends while at the lab with captions like: "Cooking up some good meth today."
Ha! I will admit to having done similar things :p
 

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
You should take advantage of any opportunity to get in at a true laboratory setting. I think it's not so much the animal portion that matters, but being around a research environment running protocols, working with equipment, etc.

I've been at a cancer biology lab at my university for a year and a half now and can run/analyze/conduct PCR, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, DNA electrophoresis, 3D cell culture, immunocytochemistry, etc on my own, things I would have never learned in a 1-unit genetics or biology lab.

Nonetheless, my favorite part is sending picture messages to my friends while at the lab with captions like: "Cooking up some good meth today."
Agreed. Schools even appreciate psychology, social work, etc. relatedresearch. It's more or less being experienced with the process of research. Even better if you're published!
 

pinkpuppy9

Illinois c/o 2019
5+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2013
5,583
3,887
Status
Veterinarian
I've been published quite a bit in the International Journal of Straight-Up Gangsta Science. It's pretty prestigious.
I cannot tell you how many times they've rejected my work. Something about a "distinct lack of street cred and general coolness."
 

Cephal0pod

c/o 2020
7+ Year Member
Nov 16, 2010
1,327
1,439
USA
Status
Veterinary Student
I cannot tell you how many times they've rejected my work. Something about a "distinct lack of street cred and general coolness."
Tell me about it. Reviewer #2 keeps insisting my statistical swag power is not strong enough to validate my findings... Pfft.
 
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Cephal0pod

c/o 2020
7+ Year Member
Nov 16, 2010
1,327
1,439
USA
Status
Veterinary Student
I go to a university known for it's research and was looking to take advantage of it. I met with a professor today who specializes in genetics and physiology and spoke to him about research opportunities. He said it would be difficult for me to get hands on experience with animals but I can start with research on the molecular level. Do you think this would be beneficial to me as a future veterinarian? I have a week to decide whether or not to do the research. Thanks!
Yes, go forth and science! Would definitely be beneficial. Getting a good feel for the scientific method and what all that entails, having to dig into and discuss primary literature, etc is very valuable. A good friend of mine was in a microbiology lab during undergrad and is now in vet school. The research subject matter definitely doesn't have to be directly related to animals.
 
Jan 18, 2006
16,877
14,956
Status
Veterinarian