francefrys

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Hey guys,

I'm a sophomore econ major undergrad and have recently became interested in the possibility of pursing med school. I know research is pretty important for a successful application. This might seem like a pretty stupid question, but if I were to do a research project completely unrelated to the medical field and outside of a lab (an econ project), would that count for anything on an application, or are they looking for lab-based research? The reason I ask is because I would like to have the possibility of pursing a graduate degree in economics as a back up plan. Any help/advice appreciated.
 

Catalystik

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I'm a sophomore econ major undergrad and have recently became interested in the possibility of pursing med school. I know research is pretty important for a successful application. This might seem like a pretty stupid question, but if I were to do a research project completely unrelated to the medical field and outside of a lab (an econ project), would that count for anything on an application, or are they looking for lab-based research? The reason I ask is because I would like to have the possibility of pursing a graduate degree in economics as a back up plan. Any help/advice appreciated.
Any research area is fine, so long as the project arises from a hypothesis-driven, scholarly effort to advance knowledge, using the scientific method.
 

piii

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Research isn't that important for med school in general. For top research institutions, yes it is. What's more important? Doing things you're passionate about.
 
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Commer_Knocker

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Do research if you want to- but ONLY if you WANT to. Contrary to popular belief, you don't NEED research for medical school, unless a) you are going for a highly competitive (top 25) school b) you want a career in academic medicine or want an MD/PhD.

Just do what you're passionate about, and as long as it doesn't take time away from other things(namely MCAT,) rock on.
 

Goro

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Anything that teaches you about the scientific principle is a good thing.

But caveat: there's a reason why Economics is called "the dismal science".


The wise DrMidlife on research: “you've preferably had some exposure to research so you can be convinced that Wakefield used malicious dirtbag methods and is not the savior of the world's children.”


The wise Crayola227 on research: So tired about the whining over the foundation of knowledge that is expected in a physician. We're applied scientists ffs. Own that. If you can't own it and take pride in it, gtfo.



Hey guys,

I'm a sophomore econ major undergrad and have recently became interested in the possibility of pursing med school. I know research is pretty important for a successful application. This might seem like a pretty stupid question, but if I were to do a research project completely unrelated to the medical field and outside of a lab (an econ project), would that count for anything on an application, or are they looking for lab-based research? The reason I ask is because I would like to have the possibility of pursing a graduate degree in economics as a back up plan. Any help/advice appreciated.
 

Commer_Knocker

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Anything that teaches you about the scientific principle is a good thing.

But caveat: there's a reason why Economics is called "the dismal science".


The wise DrMidlife on research: “you've preferably had some exposure to research so you can be convinced that Wakefield used malicious dirtbag methods and is not the savior of the world's children.”


The wise Crayola227 on research: So tired about the whining over the foundation of knowledge that is expected in a physician. We're applied scientists ffs. Own that. If you can't own it and take pride in it, gtfo.
Pay no regard to that comment, OP. Economics research is a great thing to be involved in. I wish more pre-meds had more interest in exploring problems outside of the 'bread and butter' hard sciences.
 

Lawper

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The wise DrMidlife on research: “you've preferably had some exposure to research so you can be convinced that Wakefield used malicious dirtbag methods and is not the savior of the world's children.”


The wise Crayola227 on research: So tired about the whining over the foundation of knowledge that is expected in a physician. We're applied scientists ffs. Own that. If you can't own it and take pride in it, gtfo.
It would be nice if all medical schools have the resources capable of and desire to support their students' interest in pursuing research in medical school and beyond.

Sadly, research funding is limited (and largely concentrated among the research powerhouses) and many schools are averse to students pursuing research instead of serving the community.
 

Lawper

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But caveat: there's a reason why Economics is called "the dismal science".
Pay no regard to that comment, OP. Economics research is a great thing to be involved in. I wish more pre-meds had more interest in exploring problems outside of the 'bread and butter' hard sciences.
The reason why economics is called dismal science is that the guy who coined the term (Thomas Carlyle) was strongly in favor of slavery, and feared that economic principles of supply and demand suggested that slaves should be freed. He was unable to justify slavery using economics

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2013/12/why-economics-is-really-called-the-dismal-science/282454/
 

Commer_Knocker

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The reason why economics is called dismal science is that the guy who coined the term (Thomas Carlyle) was strongly in favor of slavery, and feared that economic principles of supply and demand suggested that slaves should be freed. He was unable to justify slavery using economics

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2013/12/why-economics-is-really-called-the-dismal-science/282454/
So basically, the seminal term thrown around by economics-haters hinges on the frustration of a guy who was upset about not being able to use the field's precepts to deny people human rights?

Interesting!
 

Lawper

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So basically, the seminal term thrown around by economics-haters hinges on the frustration of a guy who was upset about not being able to use the field's precepts to deny people human rights?

Interesting!
Yep. The other story that Carlyle was bashing Malthus' pessimistic views on human population outpacing global food supply and leading to worldwide famine was basically a myth. Unfortunately, the myth stuck as viewers and critics begin associating economics with doomsday predictions on future chaos.

Economics is really a very powerful, useful, and diverse field, so it's a shame that the gloomy myth of dismal science persisted.
 
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Goro

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This is why med schools want you to do research before coming to med school. Yale, I believe, wants you to do it during med school, and require it.


It would be nice if all medical schools have the resources capable of and desire to support their students' interest in pursuing research in medical school and beyond.

Sadly, research funding is limited (and largely concentrated among the research powerhouses) and many schools are averse to students pursuing research instead of serving the community.
 
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Lawper

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This is why med schools want you to do research before coming to med school. Yale, I believe, wants you to do it during med school, and require it.
? Yale is a research powerhouse though. I'm not denying the importance of research but it would help a lot if every med school has the interest and resources available to support research in school.
 

Goro

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If students can do research at my lowly DO school, then they can even at places like Mercer, IU, Drexel, and NYMC.


? Yale is a research powerhouse though. I'm not denying the importance of research but it would help a lot if every med school has the interest and resources available to support research in school.
 
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Lawper

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If students can do research at my lowly DO school, then they can even at places like Mercer, IU, Drexel, and NYMC.
Including mission/service-based schools?

And you're too modest, Goro. We all know you're at a DO school that's as strong as CCOM, PCOM, MSUCOM, Touros etc so it's no surprise that your students can do research. Idk about in cases of say LUCOM.
 

Goro

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Yes. My wife did her post-doc at SLU. They used to call it "the Slew". Gtown has a pretty decent research program, as does Tulane and BU.


Including mission/service-based schools?
 
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Including mission/service-based schools?

And you're too modest, Goro. We all know you're at a DO school that's as strong as CCOM, PCOM, MSUCOM, Touros etc so it's no surprise that your students can do research. Idk about in cases of say LUCOM.
Based on post history, I would be willing to be someone could figure out where all the adcom members on here work
 

Lawper

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Based on post history, I would be willing to be someone could figure out where all the adcom members on here work
Maybe. Not recommended though.

Yes. My wife did her post-doc at SLU. They used to call it "the Slew". Gtown has a pretty decent research program, as does Tulane and BU.
Hmm so every medical school has a built in research program? So when new schools pop up, they are guaranteed research funding?
 

Goro

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Pick a random school, go to their website, and so a search for "research". That will answer your question. Even if a school didn't have research, depending upon what city it's in, one might be able to fine a research venue.

Schools are NOT guaranteed funding...they'd have to come up with that on their own. And engaging in scholarly activity is an accreditation requirement for LCME. COCA seems to skate very lightly on it though.




Maybe. Not recommended though.



Hmm so every medical school has a built in research program? So when new schools pop up, they are guaranteed research funding?
 

Lawper

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Schools are NOT guaranteed funding...they'd have to come up with that on their own. And engaging in scholarly activity is an accreditation requirement for LCME. COCA seems to skate very lightly on it though.
Nice! That's a good reassurance
 

mwriter394

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Have you thought about doing research in health care economics? Might be a good way to blend the fields of interest together!

I'm a chemical engineering/economics major, and I definitely understand the desire to research something within economics.