dtrack22

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And why would they do that? My understanding is (correct me if I am wrong) the hospital DPM jobs are the ones sought after, because of exactly that- pay (200K+) and legitimacy (also get to use most of your training) compared to the rest of the opportunities out there. What would cause a large private hospital to want to increase pay and title of DPM's even more if their position is already in high demand as it stands?

Well because many of the largest hospital networks in the country still do not hire podiatrists. Your assertation is only correct if all of these networks already hired DPMs at all of their facilities. Unfortunately that is not even close to being the case. Providence hiring DPMs in the PNW (they currently do not, other than 2 who were already employees of a hospital they recently acquired) would have a way bigger impact on "legitimacy" or "competition" or "opportunity" for DPMs than anything the VA will do on a national scale.

And let's not pretend that a podiatrist gets to "use most of" their training by working at many of these VA facilities. We've all rotated through them. For every hospital that has a true Foot and Ankle service run by a podiatrist or 3, there is another that cuts off toenails and feet and does very little of anything else.

Giving roughly 400 podiatrists the opportunity to obtain supervisory positions in a hospital system is huge.

For those podiatrists, yes. But let me know when private hospital networks begin following the "VA model," or make any administrative or operational decisions based on what the VA does for that matter. I'll let you know the next time someone tries to copy the "Kaiser model." I will be calling you first...
 

dtrack22

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I think more private practice associates 2 or 3 years out that have been screwed over by partners and disillusioned with the profession and some of those stresses will take these jobs. Somebody with a few years experience will almost always get the job over a new grad even if they graduated from the Harvard of podiatry residency.

and this brings up one of those unintended consequences I think should be considered by current students, residents...

I agree that if new VA positions are opened or at least the current openings pay better, young DPMs that have been screwed by other podiatrists and older DPMs that are tired of running a business will be the ones filling the positions. Not new grads. So what's left for them? Oh, even more opportunities to work for a podiatry group. But won't the VA increasing pay somehow mean that podiatry groups will have to pay more to? No, besides the fact that this has never been the case even when ortho groups and hospitals started hiring, it defies the economic law of supply and demand. If new grads can't even get a VA job, current podiatry groups have even more potential applicants to choose from. Which means they are more likely to find someone to work for very little money.
 
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air bud

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and this brings up one of those unintended consequences I think should be considered by current students, residents...

I agree that if new VA positions are opened or at least the current openings pay better, young DPMs that have been screwed by other podiatrists and older DPMs that are tired of running a business will be the ones filling the positions. Not new grads. So what's left for them? Oh, even more opportunities to work for a podiatry group. But won't the VA increasing pay somehow mean that podiatry groups will have to pay more to? No, besides the fact that this has never been the case even when ortho groups and hospitals started hiring, it defies the economic law of supply and demand. If new grads can't even get a VA job, current podiatry groups have even more potential applicants to choose from. Which means they are more likely to find someone to work for very little money.

The new grads who would benefit are those that do VA residencies. I could see those becoming much more competitive since it is a way to funnel into the system. That doesn't mean you would get great training since you may go to one run by TFPs, but then you would graduate, becoming an attending there then be involved in moving the training forward.
 
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dtrack22

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The new grads who would benefit are those that do VA residencies. I could see those becoming much more competitive since it is a way to funnel into the system.

Yeah, I could see that happening. Especially if current attending(s) are involved in the hiring. Having that relationship and experience with the current staff could very well outweigh the experience and board certification that outside applicants would have.
 
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Jul 26, 2017
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What does it take to get to the "maximum" salary at any one of the three tiers?

For other physician specialties, this is a mix of time served in profession, comparable market data private sector in that location, and RVU generation per provider.

Tier 1 - non supervisory
Tier 2 - chief podiatrist (or other supervisory role)
Tier 3 - Chief of Surgery, Staff, etc.
 

de Ribas

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So it looks like this whole process may not have accomplished anything really. Just changed podiatry from GS scale to physician pay table. Supposedly podiatrists won’t get paid any less than they were before but might not be getting any raise, effectively accomplishing nothing. Outrageous!
What are you talking about averages were like 110K before. Now minimum will be about 110k and maximum was about 170k, now it will be about 262K.

If VA wants to keep and recruit qualified podiatric physicians, they will have to pay them as high as they can.

This was a proposed solution to an ongoing problem.
 
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What are you talking about averages were like 110K before. Now minimum will be about 110k and maximum was about 170k, now it will be about 262K.

If VA wants to keep and recruit qualified podiatric physicians, they will have to pay them as high as they can.

This was a proposed solution to an ongoing problem.

I would venture very few podiatrists will obtain 262K. Tier 3 will include very few podiatrists, especially at the outset. There will be many in Tier 1, and probably 20-30% in Tier 2.

My thoughts are this: I think most podiatrists will see a significant pay raise with this. I believe when market pay and performance pay are included, many are going to approach the upper end of their tier early on.
 
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heybrother

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The tricky thing for me is being an outsider looking in at these numbers trying to understand them.

You can look up payscale for any federal employee - 2017 numbers are available and you can filter by podiatrist. If you filter out the "00" -'s which I suspect are residents (could be wrong, but I saw a guy I know on the list) you essentially filter out all the people who make $40-50K.

The next lowest people are GS12s - I don't think there are many of them and they make ...$110K. What's strange to me is that when I look at some of the payscales for areas these numbers are actually significantly higher than what the payscales say so there must be some payment adjustments upward being made to people beyond the base tables.

Everyone seems to tap out at $150-160.

Title 38 Pay Schedules - Office of Human Resources Management (OHRM)

If you go to this link you can see current pay scales. Locality pay seems to be a part of the process - do the tiers/scales listed above include locality pay or is that added after the fact? (...I assume yes)

The current system seems to include things like - Associate, Full, Intermediate, Senior, Chief. I suppose all of that is going away in the new process because the physician/dentist pdfs don't have any of that in them.
 
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You are correct! The assumption is no pay is increase unless you facility deems you valuable and does not want to lose you. The philosophy now is that it is for retention and recruitment, and we should not assume any significant increase. We have not hit the lottery! Very sad!
 
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Well how did everyone fare on the initial determination? My direct salary went up ~30%, not including performance pay.

Our biggest initial barrier was lack of specific funding to our institution. Heard from numerous admin their determination was less than they wanted to give, relating to financial constraints.
 
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dpmgrad

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At my facility, we are looking at 30 - 35% increase (excluding performance pay). HR is still processing paperwork and has indicated that they will honor the increase. We will see when all of the paperwork is completed.
 
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