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Is Sudanese considered URM or African? How about moroccan?
 

NotASerialKiller

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White. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. It includes people who indicate their race as "White" or report entries such as Irish, German, Italian, Lebanese, Arab, Moroccan, or Caucasian.

Black or African American. A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. It includes people who indicate their race as "Black, African Am., or Negro"; or report entries such as African American, Kenyan, Nigerian, or Haitian.

American Indian and Alaska Native. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. This category includes people who indicate their race as "American Indian or Alaska Native" or report entries such as Navajo, Blackfeet, Inupiat, Yup'ik, or Central American Indian groups or South American Indian groups.

Asian. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. It includes people who indicate their race as "Asian Indian," "Chinese," "Filipino," "Korean," "Japanese," "Vietnamese," and "Other Asian" or provide other detailed Asian responses.

Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. It includes people who indicate their race as "Native Hawaiian," "Guamanian or Chamorro," "Samoan," and "Other Pacific Islander" or provide other detailed Pacific Islander responses.

Two or more races. People may have chosen to provide two or more races either by checking two or more race response check boxes, by providing multiple responses, or by some combination of check boxes and other responses.

The concept of race is separate from the concept of Hispanic origin. Percentages for the various race categories add to 100 percent, and should not be combined with the percent Hispanic.

Non-Hispanic White alone persons. Individuals who responded "No, not Spanish/Hispanic/Latino" and who reported "White" as their only entry in the race question. Tallies that show race categories for Hispanics and non-Hispanics separately are also available.

You are white. This has nothing to do with skin tone. White is simply a category. I think that it is stupid to use a color as a label for a category, but as @LizzyM points out, you don't expect someone looking like the Hulk when someone says, "Mr. Green".
 

feather421

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Jan 12, 2015
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Moroccan, no, Sudanese potentially, depending on how you identify and present to people. If you're an African immigrant, you're not as tied into the AA community, so you should be able to talk about your experience of being black in America, and how that has affected you and your family.

The litmus question should always be: how would you feel briefly touching on your race/ethnicity in interviews? If you can talk about your experience in a sensitive, intelligent, and honest way, then you're fine. If you can't, then you have your answer. For example, "my mom is a Sudanese immigrant, that part of my heritage is very important to me, here's an example of what it means to me to be black in America" vs. "I went to Spain for a semester abroad, speak fluent Spanish, and have a lot of Hispanic friends, so I'm like an honorary hispanic" or "my family says my great grandmother was half Cherokee, isn't that cool?"
 
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Lawper

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White. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. It includes people who indicate their race as "White" or report entries such as Irish, German, Italian, Lebanese, Arab, Moroccan, or Caucasian.

Black or African American. A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. It includes people who indicate their race as "Black, African Am., or Negro"; or report entries such as African American, Kenyan, Nigerian, or Haitian.

American Indian and Alaska Native. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America) and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. This category includes people who indicate their race as "American Indian or Alaska Native" or report entries such as Navajo, Blackfeet, Inupiat, Yup'ik, or Central American Indian groups or South American Indian groups.

Asian. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. It includes people who indicate their race as "Asian Indian," "Chinese," "Filipino," "Korean," "Japanese," "Vietnamese," and "Other Asian" or provide other detailed Asian responses.

Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. It includes people who indicate their race as "Native Hawaiian," "Guamanian or Chamorro," "Samoan," and "Other Pacific Islander" or provide other detailed Pacific Islander responses.

Two or more races. People may have chosen to provide two or more races either by checking two or more race response check boxes, by providing multiple responses, or by some combination of check boxes and other responses.

The concept of race is separate from the concept of Hispanic origin. Percentages for the various race categories add to 100 percent, and should not be combined with the percent Hispanic.

Non-Hispanic White alone persons. Individuals who responded "No, not Spanish/Hispanic/Latino" and who reported "White" as their only entry in the race question. Tallies that show race categories for Hispanics and non-Hispanics separately are also available.

You are white. This has nothing to do with skin tone. White is simply a category. I think that it is stupid to use a color as a label for a category, but as @LizzyM points out, you don't expect someone looking like the Hulk when someone says, "Mr. Green".
AMCAS and medical schools designate URM based on the (flawed and inconsistent) race classification presented by the US Census Bureau. Moroccan is white; Sudanese is likely white unless you are from a region near South Sudan, then you are black.
 

Doug Underhill

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Sep 2, 2011
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You don't have to be natively part of the African-American community to be African-American. Nobody would doubt that President Obama is, despite being raised by his white grandparents on Hawaii.

If you look black, you can call yourself black or African-American.

The question gets a bit more confusing for biracial people.
 

Lawper

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You don't have to be natively part of the African-American community to be African-American. Nobody would doubt that President Obama is, despite being raised by his white grandparents on Hawaii.

If you look black, you can call yourself black or African-American.
Apparently, medical schools strictly follow the racial classification based on the US Census Bureau (so not on skin tone). So a black Arab, for instance, would be considered white, unless their parents themselves were black.
 

Goro

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My white Afrikaans-speaking neighbor, or my jewish friend from Zimbabwe are definitely African-Americans, but they are are NOT UR<.

Moroccan: not URM
Sudanese: If Arab, not URM. If Ku****e of Southern Sudan and/or as per black African, then yes.

You don't have to be natively part of the African-American community to be African-American. Nobody would doubt that President Obama is, despite being raised by his white grandparents on Hawaii.

If you look black, you can call yourself black or African-American.

The question gets a bit more confusing for biracial people.