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UT Chattanooga vs. Shenandoah DPT? state vs private U? Help!

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zoe14

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Hi to anyone who reads this (and if you do and have a nugget of wisdom to share, bless you! I am so torn between schools right now),

I was accepted to the DPT program at Shenandoah (out of state, private) and was very excited about my experience there. My interview was very relaxed and enjoyable, the faculty I met were personable, highly qualified and go above and beyond, facilities were top notch with every piece of equipment you could hope to use. Students boasted no competition between classmates existed. The program also offers several service and clinical experiences abroad (specifically Germany & Australia, two places I have always dreamed of living). My hope was that I could get the connections during my clinicals abroad to land a job there. I realize that is a very large goal, and it would take time and paperwork, but it is appealing nonetheless. Other pros: moving out of my hometown/ state. I have been wanting to move out of the South for years. Cons: tuition is about $90,000.

Very recently, I was accepted to UT Chattanooga, which would be in-state tuition (half the cost of SU), it's also a good program. However, I do not like that UTC doesn't hold interviews, so we don't get the opportunity to talk to faculty and current students. The passing rates are as good as SU's, the facilities are new like SU's though technology is not as current, the faculty are qualified, but after talking to a current student who was very honest, possibly not as personable as SU's and not all are currently practicing PT's. Cons: I'll stay in the city I have been trying to get out of for another 3 years, which I realize would be doable, just a little disappointing.

I do not have any undergraduate debt, but even so, it seems that every PT I talk to recommends the cheapest option. Do I pick the best price or the school I feel fits me better?

Any words of wisdom out there? Personal experiences of either programs/ recommendations? Sorry for the novel and thank you in advance!
 
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jblil

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I often see folks expressing their desire to work abroad after getting their degree. To be perfectly frank, it's a pipe dream, at least if you want to work in an industrialized country. The reason is because those countries have a high unemployment rate and want to protect their local job market. Work permits will be very hard, if not impossible, to obtain. Additionally, any medical career will require local specific vetting and licenses since you are dealing with other people's health. Just look into how hard it is for FMGs (foreign medical graduates - MDs from other countries) to obtain a license to practice in the US, and you'll see.
Source: I worked for the United Nations in several countries so I have first-hand experience with this stuff.

As for SU vs. UTC: I'll join the chorus of "go to the cheaper school."
 

jesspt

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Hi to anyone who reads this (and if you do and have a nugget of wisdom to share, bless you! I am so torn between schools right now),

I was accepted to the DPT program at Shenandoah (out of state, private) and was very excited about my experience there. My interview was very relaxed and enjoyable, the faculty I met were personable, highly qualified and go above and beyond, facilities were top notch with every piece of equipment you could hope to use. Students boasted no competition between classmates existed. The program also offers several service and clinical experiences abroad (specifically Germany & Australia, two places I have always dreamed of living). My hope was that I could get the connections during my clinicals abroad to land a job there. I realize that is a very large goal, and it would take time and paperwork, but it is appealing nonetheless. Other pros: moving out of my hometown/ state. I have been wanting to move out of the South for years. Cons: tuition is about $90,000.

Very recently, I was accepted to UT Chattanooga, which would be in-state tuition (half the cost of SU), it's also a good program. However, I do not like that UTC doesn't hold interviews, so we don't get the opportunity to talk to faculty and current students. The passing rates are as good as SU's, the facilities are new like SU's though technology is not as current, the faculty are qualified, but after talking to a current student who was very honest, possibly not as personable as SU's and not all are currently practicing PT's. Cons: I'll stay in the city I have been trying to get out of for another 3 years, which I realize would be doable, just a little disappointing.

I do not have any undergraduate debt, but even so, it seems that every PT I talk to recommends the cheapest option. Do I pick the best price or the school I feel fits me better?

Any words of wisdom out there? Personal experiences of either programs/ recommendations? Sorry for the novel and thank you in advance!
Would you rather pay $90,000 for a product, or pay $45,000 for a nearly identical product?
 

zoe14

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Thank you both for your input. All things my ego didn't want to hear but I'm sure my future self will thank me for. UTC it is.
 

starrsgirl

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Why not set up a second visit at UTC? Ask for a student tour and maybe sit in a class. You might get a different feel when you go again. We've had quite a few students do that for our program as they make their final decisions. Even if schools hold interviews, sometimes you are just too nervous to really take it all in.
 

pegasuscvc

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Your future self will indeed thank you for it. Personable professors, as nice as they are, aren't going to be hanging around with you ten-twenty years after graduation. Student loans will.
 
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