kd5qdf

10+ Year Member
Jan 2, 2009
3
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Pre-Medical
Hey guys,

I am a high school senior and am trying to decide if I should follow a pre-med track in college. One thing I am worried about is that I have an uncorrectable visual disability (acuity about 20 / 70). I have been able to adapt very well (I simply need to be closer to objects to seem them as well as those with perfect vision). To provide a standard of comparison, I have a driver's license and can sight read music in my school's top orchestra. In addition, I have not been hurt academically (I will be the valedictorian of a class of 1000, have been accepted into Yale early action, and have conducted organic chemistry research at my state university).

I understand how difficult the medical school admissions process is, but I was wondering if my disability would hurt my chances of admission into medical school and/or would make it prohibitively difficult to succeed in medicine? I understand that I could never be a surgeon but am interested in oncology.
 

tennisball80

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Feb 5, 2008
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Hi Kd5qdf,

This is tennisball80 and I'm a high school senior too. I do not have very eye vision either so I can understand how your situation could be.

Since you have your driver license, I don't think it would be a great big deal during medical school admission. I will let other medical students or premeds to answer this question.

Congratz to Yale acceptance. Just wondering, how did you conduct organic chemistry research at your state university as a high school senior ?

This thread might you.
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=589389
 

Terpskins99

Fear... The Stig
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Mar 8, 2005
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I understand how difficult the medical school admissions process is, but I was wondering if my disability would hurt my chances of admission into medical school and/or would make it prohibitively difficult to succeed in medicine? I understand that I could never be a surgeon but am interested in oncology.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7318398

Nothing is impossible. :thumbup:
 
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scott8013

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Oct 22, 2007
28
1
Lawrence
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Pre-Medical
With your level of vision loss, I would imagine you will have to mention it at interviews, and when you are accepted there are practical standards in terms of your motor ability etc.. but I can't imagine that in your case it would have any impact whatsoever. You will be fine. Wouldn't even give it a second thought.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7318398

Good luck!
 

Terpskins99

Fear... The Stig
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Mar 8, 2005
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With your level of vision loss, I would imagine you will have to mention it at interviews, and when you are accepted there are practical standards in terms of your motor ability etc.. but I can't imagine that in your case it would have any impact whatsoever. You will be fine. Wouldn't even give it a second thought.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7318398

Good luck!
HAH! Beat ya to the punch. :p
 

Local

Stop the Shananigans!i!i!
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Oct 30, 2008
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Seeing as you have a drivers license, i figure it wouldnt be a problem.
But seriously, you've already done research????
 

kd5qdf

10+ Year Member
Jan 2, 2009
3
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I received a research grant after being admitted into a research program connected with the University of Texas at Austin. I was working on the proton exchange membranes in direct methanol fuel cells, attempting to increase the conductivity of the membrane with various additive imidazole compounds. Since I am interested in entering an MD/PhD program and conducting research (along with patient care), the high school research experience was very helpful in ensuring my research aspirations (although it was a little difficult to get used to a graduate lab environment).
 

tennisball80

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I received a research grant after being admitted into a research program connected with the University of Texas at Austin. I was working on the proton exchange membranes in direct methanol fuel cells, attempting to increase the conductivity of the membrane with various additive imidazole compounds. Since I am interested in entering an MD/PhD program and conducting research (along with patient care), the high school research experience was very helpful in ensuring my research aspirations (although it was a little difficult to get used to a graduate lab environment).

It really rare for a high school student to get such a good opportunity. I'm sure you have done a great research in the graduate lab environment. ;)

In fact, being involving in research was one of my high school dreams.

Did your teacher tell you the opportunity or you just found it from the school's website ?
 

kd5qdf

10+ Year Member
Jan 2, 2009
3
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I knew I wanted to do research and therefore took it upon myself to find a good program. I received help from my AP Chem teacher when I applied, but the burden of finding the program fell upon myself.

Thanks for all the help!

Any more thoughts?
 

yokurutu

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Jan 5, 2009
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Oh and I don't know if I should disclose my disability to undergraduate school.
I get extra timing and whatnot of some accommodation if I do, but I don't want to feel special or have people think I am special.
 
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JeetKuneDo

10+ Year Member
Oct 25, 2008
2,347
21
Status
Medical Student
hi. I have an eye condition that allows me to see only center.
I don't see anything in my peripheral. It's pretty much a tunnel vision.

I have too passed a driver's license vision test. I had trouble seeing blinking light, but they didn't seem to care. So here I am driving on the road.

My problem: I want to be a surgeon.:mad: I don't have problem with visual acuity. I'm hoping my vision stays the same...until I die.


Oh and I don't know if I should disclose my disability to undergraduate school.
I get extra timing and whatnot of some accommodation if I do, but I don't want to feel special or have people think I am special.

I don't know what to do here. :scared:
If your disability will affect your classes, then you should disclose it to your university. If you go to a big school, these accommodations and services are usually pretty confidential, so not too many people will even know about it.
 

abena301

10+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2007
13
1
Status
Pre-Medical
If your disability will affect your classes, then you should disclose it to your university. If you go to a big school, these accommodations and services are usually pretty confidential, so not too many people will even know about it.
Exactly, Definitely disclose it though to your undergraduate school once you enroll. Accepting the services can only help you.

Also, knowledge of any accommodations you will receive should be treated on a "need-to-know" basis. The disability dept. at your future school, your professors, and you (of course) are "need-to-know". No one else should have the right to disclose anything without your consent.

Classmates who may judge you if they knew: Your accommodations are none of their damn business anyway.
 
Jan 19, 2015
3
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Hey guys,

I am a high school senior and am trying to decide if I should follow a pre-med track in college. One thing I am worried about is that I have an uncorrectable visual disability (acuity about 20 / 70). I have been able to adapt very well (I simply need to be closer to objects to seem them as well as those with perfect vision). To provide a standard of comparison, I have a driver's license and can sight read music in my school's top orchestra. In addition, I have not been hurt academically (I will be the valedictorian of a class of 1000, have been accepted into Yale early action, and have conducted organic chemistry research at my state university). .

I understand how difficult the medical school admissions process is, but I was wondering if my disability would hurt my chances of admission into medical school and/or would make it prohibitively difficult to succeed in medicine? I understand that I could never be a surgeon but am interested in oncology..


Hi
I have a question, were you able to get in any medical school or your condition put u in negative place. I am in same situation and wondering my chances of getting in med school.
Thanks
 

Time Table

5+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2014
280
127
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)

Hi
I have a question, were you able to get in any medical school or your condition put u in negative place. I am in same situation and wondering my chances of getting in med school.
Thanks..
I don't think the corrective lenses is an issue at any medical school admission. And I doubt OP will answer considering he last came here 6 years ago.
 

RTC19

5+ Year Member
Jun 12, 2014
10,491
13,608
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]

Hi
I have a question, were you able to get in any medical school or your condition put u in negative place. I am in same situation and wondering my chances of getting in med school.
Thanks..

I second that the original poster is very unlikely to return, as this thread was created in 2009 and hasn't had any activity since then. However, I will add that medical schools have something called technical standards, which are physical requirements every student must meet. I would encourage you to google them for a few medical schools and see if you satisfy them. If you are able to satisfy technical standards, then your condition will in no way harm you in the admissions process.
 
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