tejaboss

10+ Year Member
Apr 21, 2008
2
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MD/PhD Student
Hi everybody in forum .i am new to this network.i have done graduation in 2004, and i have just completed my residency in internal medicine in india.I have come to know that residency program in US prefers fresh graduate,and do not want a 4 or 5 years old graduate,which technically speaking is my case.the reason given that old graduate lost their touch with recent advances.but i was in a teaching institute and was doing my post graduation,so i was not "out of touch".kindly advice what are my chances of getting a residency in US,in this regard,if i will get good scores in USMLE.
 

DarthNeurology

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Mar 20, 2008
780
10
Windy City
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Hi everybody in forum .i am new to this network.i have done graduation in 2004, and i have just completed my residency in internal medicine in india.I have come to know that residency program in US prefers fresh graduate,and do not want a 4 or 5 years old graduate,which technically speaking is my case.the reason given that old graduate lost their touch with recent advances.but i was in a teaching institute and was doing my post graduation,so i was not "out of touch".kindly advice what are my chances of getting a residency in US,in this regard,if i will get good scores in USMLE.
No one can state your chances, you have to apply to find out, a lot of posters post their "arguments" to what they think PDs don't want to see in an applicant and really just want support as they begin applying. No one can say for sure if you will get a US residency, you may, or you may not. It makes no sense to advise you with this small amount of information. Residency match is getting more and more competitive for FMGs like yourself each year, many hospitals require FMGs to have very high board scores to match, plus Step 2 CS is being made more difficult, as you haven't done any of these exams yet I can't advise you at all.
 
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T

tejaboss

10+ Year Member
Apr 21, 2008
2
0
Status
MD/PhD Student
:) thanks for the post.I agree with your logic.but the point i want to clear is that being an 5 year old graduate,will be taken as negative or not ,even if one remain in teaching program during those years.kindly give authentic information.:confused:
 

docrv

Attending
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jan 5, 2007
43
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Attending Physician
tejaboss, it depends on the program you are applying to as programs tend to have different requirements. You have to check each program in freida for their specific requirements. I don't think anyone can give you any authentic information here. Most programs evaluate each applicant as a whole: USMLE scores, years from graduation, visa issues, publications, US experience, etc.
 

barcalounger

10+ Year Member
Feb 3, 2008
65
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
thanks for the post.I agree with your logic.but the point i want to clear is that being an 5 year old graduate,will be taken as negative or not ,even if one remain in teaching program during those years.
If it does turn out to be a negative, are you going to go back in time to fix it? It is part of your record regardless, so I would suggest simply doing your best and not worrying it about it.
 
B

Blade28

If it does turn out to be a negative, are you going to go back in time to fix it? It is part of your record regardless, so I would suggest simply doing your best and not worrying it about it.
Agreed.

If you're serious about coming to train in the US, do as well as you can on the USMLE, look at FREIDA for information on each program's specific requirements, and make sure you have US clinical experience and US letters of recommendation.

Best of luck.
 

buckley

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jul 30, 2007
766
2
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Resident [Any Field]
Great advice given above.

Far off year of grad is a negative in many respects, but not something that cannot be overcome. For certain states however (i.e. Illinois), there are plenty of requirements you have to finish before you can start residency if you are beyond 2 or 5 years after graduation. Look into these carefully.

For the record, you can match without US clinical experience and without US letters. It is a HUGE advantage to have them, but not a necessity. Just do your research, programs say whether or not they require US experience. That said, if you have the chance to do some US rotations, that would be good I think so you don't end up to be that weird foreigner come internship start:D As for me, I resign to my fate...:laugh:
 

Brunette1981

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Jan 30, 2007
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East Coast
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I don't really know for certain but from what I have read it seems like years from graduation is less important if you have been continuously clinically involved since then (eg, did residency, began to work as an attending). It is much more of a red flag if you have gaps in clinical exposure, is my understanding - so it would be worse if you did exclusively teaching/research after residency in India as opposed to continuing to practice. If that is the case for you, I would recommend getting back into clinical work, either in India or in the US.

I've worked with surgical interns on rotations who were older and were practicing surgeons in their home countries before repeating residency here so it does happen.