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What Exactly Does This Mean?

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by JackD, Dec 2, 2008.

  1. JackD

    JackD -
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    Right now I am in an undergraduate psychology research course. The point of the class was to design and implement a study, then to write a research paper. I did all of that and submitted it a few weeks ago.

    Today, I was approached by the graduate assistant for the class. He said mine was one of the best studies, that the results were interesting, all of that. We were in a noisy hallway and I was more excited to find out that I did well on a project that is basically our entire grade for the course, that I missed the real point of what he was trying to say. He said something about potentially submitting it to a "undergraduate poster" (i think that is what he said). He said it could help with grad school applications and whatnot.

    My question is, what exactly does that mean? I have no real interest in becoming a researcher, so I am not totally sure what any of that meant. I have never looked into submitting research to anyone. Any ideas what he was suggesting I do?

    Normally I would just go back and ask what he meant but I don't think I will be able to get a hold of him for a few days.
     
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  3. erg923

    erg923 Regional Clinical Officer, Cenpatico National
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    Most decent size universities have "undergraduate research fairs" where undergrads can present their work (ie., honors thesis, indepedent research, etc.) in a public forum and share it with other interested parties (although most of this time this is just your fellow research nerd clasmates and the department faculty). Your research is usually presented as a large poster, consiting of an abstract, very brief lit review, breif findings, and brief discussion. It is done in this format so people can browse around and take a look at lots of different research in a short amount of time. No one wants to go to a fair and read a bunch of papers. This is good experience at presenting research (discussing it over and over with pople helps you understand it better), practicing your public speaking skills, and making connections and/or good impression on the faculty and your possible future LOR writers.
     
  4. JackD

    JackD -
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    Do you think it is actually worth doing, even though I do not plan on becoming a researcher? I have already applied to grad schools, ones which are 0% research oriented. All are professional schools, so obviously all clinical training. In fact, the grad student who suggested this to me, upon hearing which schools I had applied to, said that those universities would have no interest in hearing about research I have conducted.

    Would there really be any value to this, besides just the experience of presenting research?
     
  5. erg923

    erg923 Regional Clinical Officer, Cenpatico National
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    Although you may not want to produce it, you have to know it. Even PsyD programs require students to take stats and design classes, and you should know how to evaluate research and extrapolate it into practice (ie., see methodological limitations, poor designs, or be able to spot when an author is overreaching with his conclusions). Few MDs go on to pursue academic/research medicine, but I dont want to go to a doc that doesnt read up on the latest treatments, tests or medications for my illnesses, right? Same goes for psychologists. The only way to do this is to get some research expereince. Being able to effectively communciate/speak in a public forum is also a valued skill in this field, and presenting research is good practice for that. If presenting it is really that terrible, I still would encouage you to go, if nothing more than to expand your knowledge base and....learn. I love picking up new facts and findings that I otherwise might not get through the usual journals I subscribe to.

    PsyD. program will focus alot more on clinical application, no doubt, but even professional school students are required (or at least encouraged) to produce something while there. I see lots of PsyD students at professional conferences actually. I persoanly think clincial training is enhanced when one is digging into the literature and learning a theory from the bottom up, instead of the top down.
     
    #4 erg923, Dec 3, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2008
  6. WannaBeDrMe

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    Agreed. A lot of your competition will have research presentations and possibly publications. Interpretation of publised information is going to become a huge part of your life from this point forward.

    Once you are in the field, you will be able to immediately notice someone who isn't well read by the 3rd word out of their mouth. Ok, maybe that's a bit of an exaggeration... but it's out there. Probably not as much at the doctoral level... but my current peers are master's level clinicians and I'm in constant awe of how many people don't even know basics; let alone recently published stuff!

    It isn't that much work to do the poster. Putting together the paper is the hard part... the poster is fun! If it's a small conference, it won't be that big of a deal, you just answer questions. (They will ask questions)

    Go for it... like ERG said... the connections you make can be invaluable. You never know who might remember your work down the road and open up new doors for you!

    Good luck and congrats on being recognized.
     

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