kings2

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Hey,

Just looking at the match lists-- what is med/peds? How is it different from peds?

Also, what a preliminary hospital for residency (i.e. BU's match had diff hospitals for "preliminary" and regular)

Thanks, just a lowly undergrad trying to figure sh** out!

kings
 

Kalel

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Med/peds is a combined internal medicine/peds residency that allows you to be board certified in both specialties. It's a four year residency. Preliminary spots are intern year spots (first year out of medical school) in either medicine or surgery that people in certain specialties have to do before entering their chosen specialty (eg opthamologists, radiologists, anesthesiologists, and rad onc all have to do a one year internship in medicine or surgery before beginning their residency program in their respective specialty).
 

carrigallen

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Kalel covered it pretty well - med peds is ideal for those interested in pediatric medicine and want to further specialize in a medicine specialty. It is pediatric-oriented medicine..the disciplinary training is more comprehensive like medicine.
 
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Blade28

Originally posted by Yogi Bear
isn't med/peds = a specialized version of family pratice?
Nope. As the previous posts indicated, it's lumped together with medicine and peds. IIRC, the main fellowships available after an FP residency are sports medicine, geriatrics, OB, preventive medicine and rural medicine.
 

Whisker Barrel Cortex

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Med / Peds is a combined residency in internal medicine (medicine for adults) and pediatrics (medicine for kids). It takes 4 years (as opposed to 3 years each if done separately).

After you graduate, you can practice much like a family practioner without the obstetrics but with a little more in depth knowledge on other topics. Also, you are free to subspecialize in any of the fellowships for peds or medicine. This includes cardiology, gastroenterology, endocrinology, rheumatology, nephrology, etc and their pediatric counterparts. With something like family practice, you are NOT eligible to subspecialize in these fields.
 

Yogi Bear

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other than the fellowship training, how's a family practice doc different from an internal med doc w/o any fellowships?
 

Kalel

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Originally posted by Yogi Bear
other than the fellowship training, how's a family practice doc different from an internal med doc w/o any fellowships?
FP's do peds, ob, and IM. FP residencies are, in general, more out-patient based as well.
 

Whisker Barrel Cortex

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Originally posted by Yogi Bear
other than the fellowship training, how's a family practice doc different from an internal med doc w/o any fellowships?
FPs see everyone including kids, adults, and pregnant women. Internal medicine docs see only adults (over 18) and no obstretrics (they do perform gyn exams but pregnant patients are sent to OB/GYNs). Both are generally office based, although newer "hospitalist" general internal medicine docs focus on inpatient medicine.
 

Yogi Bear

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Originally posted by Whisker Barrel Cortex
FPs see everyone including kids, adults, and pregnant women. Internal medicine docs see only adults (over 18) and no obstretrics (they do perform gyn exams but pregnant patients are sent to OB/GYNs). Both are generally office based, although newer "hospitalist" general internal medicine docs focus on inpatient medicine.
so a fp can do everything that an ob/gyn can? from prenatal-->delivery, etc.?
 

Whisker Barrel Cortex

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Almost everything. They usually do not do C-sections (except in very rare and very rural ares). Also, if it is a high risk pregnancy, they usually refer. But other than that they can do the whole prenatal to delivery and then see the baby and mother afterwards. Unfortunately, I have heard that in many larger cities, they have stopped doing OB for liability reasons.
 

Adcadet

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I believe in the rural medical center I spent two days at, the FP doc would have the general surgeon on staff to do the C-sections while the FP's would assist. Anyone know how common this is?
 

Yogi Bear

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Originally posted by Adcadet
I believe in the rural medical center I spent two days at, the FP doc would have the general surgeon on staff to do the C-sections while the FP's would assist. Anyone know how common this is?
watching ER, it seems like only the EM docs deliver babies...ehhe.