What's the average BCMP (science gpa) for med schools?

lcr2108

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i got in this past cycle with a 3.4 bcpm. nothing's impossible
 

ucladoc2b

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I heard for Cali now it is more like a 3.8
The science GPA for admitted students claiming CA residency for 2009 was 3.58. I would imagine that the BCPM GPA for UCs to be somewhere between 3.6-3.7.

Source: http://www.aamc.org/data/facts/applicantmatriculant/table21-mcatgpastatemat09.pdf

Keep in mind, science GPA is highly variable based on major and courses taken (lower division courses tend to have lower GPAs and stricter curves, science majors tend to have higher science GPAs based on more science classes taken and easier curves in upper division courses, et cetera).
 

SweetRain

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The science GPA for admitted students claiming CA residency for 2009 was 3.58. I would imagine that the BCPM GPA for UCs to be somewhere between 3.6-3.7.

Source: http://www.aamc.org/data/facts/applicantmatriculant/table21-mcatgpastatemat09.pdf

Keep in mind, science GPA is highly variable based on major and courses taken (lower division courses tend to have lower GPAs and stricter curves, science majors tend to have higher science GPAs based on more science classes taken and easier curves in upper division courses, et cetera).
I'm not sure if I agree with the easier curve part. I guess it's different for every school and class but if they do have higher curves, it's because the material is actually more demanding.
 

alibai3ah

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I think the medians are more around 3.7 to 3.8 --- unfortunately, while 3.6 isn't crap, it is below the median for many schools.

EDIT: Observing the median gpa is more useful than averages.
That's not true. You are looking at the MSAR, which represents accepted students not matriculants.

3.6 is a perfectly acceptable bcpm for the vast majority of low/mid tier medical schools. The Top 20 schools tend to favor students with higher GPAs.

The UC's have a lot of variation in GPA and MCAT score. You could have lower numbers if you are a great fit with the school and get in, but at the same time you could have spectacular numbers and not get in. Each UC has its own special criteria (this topic has been discussed before).

I wouldn't worry about your GPA, it's good. Not concentrate on the other parts of the application. There are too many things that count here.
 

ucladoc2b

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I'm not sure if I agree with the easier curve part. I guess it's different for every school and class but if they do have higher curves, it's because the material is actually more demanding.
By easier curve, I mean the mean grade of the class is higher and the distribution is more generous. At least in several of my undergrad LD courses, no more than 18-20% of the class could recieve any type of A grade. The mean class GPA for these courses was around 2.5-2.8 (higher depending on overall class performance relative to previous classes). Upper level courses tend to have higher grades overall (I know that 70-80% of grades in upper division bio courses were As and Bs on average). This information is school specific and may be different at different schools (to state the obvious), but in my experience, most places tend to follow this model.

As for the material being more demanding, well, that's really a question for the individual student.
 
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