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When to quit full-time job?

Discussion in 'Nontraditional Students' started by UpAndUp, 05.13.14.

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  1. UpAndUp

    UpAndUp 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    09.03.12
    Messages:
    16
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Hi everyone,

    I'm hoping your balanced voices can lend some sanity to this decision. I am currently working full-time and taking Gen Chem and lab. I'm not overly concerned with the length of my post-bacc (i.e. not looking for the quickest road to med school) but I do want to maximize my chances for success.

    I think I've been clinging to the idea that my time in the workforce (1.25 years since graduation) will help offset my abysmal 2.37 cGPA. I've been doing much better in school recently, but obviously have an uphill battle. Would returning to school full-time in the fall of 2014 for a year and a half (with the intent of earning as close to a 4.0 as possible) be more favorable in the eyes of adcoms? Or would another 3+ years of FT work and part-time classes be enough, if my grades stay high? I will have volunteering hours in both scenarios.

    Thanks for your input!
     
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  3. Leslie_Knope

    Leslie_Knope

    Joined:
    03.09.14
    Messages:
    796
    MDApps:
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    I had to keep working so I did. I took 1-2 classes per semester while working, volunteering, and doing some research. Since you're in no rush maybe keep working. Otherwise, what is your plan to pay for your post-bacc?
     
  4. Jewels86

    Jewels86 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    04.07.13
    Messages:
    187
    Location:
    Texas
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Personally, I'd keep working. One, you do have an uphill battle with that 2.37 cGPA. Two, it'll be tougher to get back into anything that's worth a darn if you take time off, especially now that you graduated. It'll look better that you worked because if you quit full time work, it will appear as if "I'm trying to find myself". That's how hiring managers that pay anything better than minimum will see it when they interview you, despite the progression of your coursework. It's a brutal world; minimize the hits.

    Take your time. I know you already stated this but, take your time. Enjoy your life. You'll get there.
     
    Being likes this.
  5. ridethecliche

    ridethecliche Meep Meep Meep 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Status:
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    You're going to have to play your cards perfectly to get DO grade replacement to work. I doubt you'll have an MD shot.
     
  6. jaguar33

    jaguar33 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    11.05.13
    Messages:
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    Location:
    The South
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I would recommend putting all of your focus on top grades and extracurriculars if you are serious about med school. If you absolutely need the money or your job is medically related think about going part time.
     
  7. UpAndUp

    UpAndUp 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    09.03.12
    Messages:
    16
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I just got advice from @leslieknope ?!? So proud. Your theme song is my ringtone. I am thinking about taking out a loan and moving back with my parents and going to a state school. Not ideal, but not paying rent and getting in-state tuition would minimize the size of the loan I'd need. I'm going to a private school at the moment.

    Thanks @Jewels86 I definitely keep reminding my self that this is a marathon not a sprint. I'm so busy now that I feel like I can't focus on either thing: work or school. So you think that having work experience will help offset my low GPA? (With strong current grades)

    My happiness and debt levels aside, I'm just wondering what is more likely to get me in the door of a US medical school (I'm fine with DO).
     
  8. ridethecliche

    ridethecliche Meep Meep Meep 5+ Year Member

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    If you're fine with DO, which is a good option for you, focus on exactly the same things, i.e. best grades possible. DO's do grade replacement, so it's possible to bring your grades WAY up. MD's will average them, which will do little to help.
     
  9. milski

    milski 1K member 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    Where the rain grows
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    It is close but not exactly the same. What they actually do is they take both of your scores for the amount of credits each class was. So in your case you will have a 3 credits A and a 3 credits F. This is the same as having 6 credits of C. Note that for your overall GPA this is slightly worse than having 3 credits of C, which would be the case if you took the course once and got a C.
     
  10. Being

    Being

    Joined:
    10.09.13
    Messages:
    177
    What caused you to do so poorly? Why do you want to go to medical school all of a sudden? Undergrad major?

    I second the advice to work for a while. It will make it easier to sell the "I'm a whole new person and I'm ready to take on this challenge" and the "based on X experiences, I have come to the conclusion that medicine is the right field for me" stories.
     
  11. milski

    milski 1K member 5+ Year Member

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    Because it contrasts with the way DO applications do it - they will completely disregard your previous grade. "Averaging" is only an averagely accurate terminology. ;)

    And yes, your example is correct.
     
    Last edited: 05.14.14
  12. UpAndUp

    UpAndUp 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    @Being thanks for the reply.

    I did poorly because I tried to work 2 part time jobs, and had no real direction or motivation. I didn't have any clue what type of career I wanted. One of my part time jobs was as a software developer at a hospital, which is what started to open my eyes to the fact that there are career paths out there that really motivate me. My study habits have drastically improved, now that I know exactly what I'm working for.

    I have been working in non-profit healthcare organizations for several years now so that may be something (albeit a small thing) to draw on when it comes time to convince an admissions committee that medicine is the career for me.
     

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