Cerberus

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I hate ****ing labs, if i wanted to work in one i'd go get a PhD not an MD. I really don't see why there is so much emphasis on lab work. Most people don't plan on academic medicine, so what is the purpose of "research" being such a great EC?
 

Gleevec

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Originally posted by Cerberus
I hate ****ing labs, if i wanted to work in one i'd go get a PhD not an MD. I really don't see why there is so much emphasis on lab work. Most people don't plan on academic medicine, so what is the purpose of "research" being such a great EC?
The "top" schools we erroneously refer to are top research schools. Ideally, their goal is to train academic physicians to train the next generation of physicians and to pioneer new research, but ultimately they just train a lot of dermatologists and radiologists.

So everyone is being delusional in this case.
 

jhk43

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research brings in da money. schools want research oriented docs who will bring in da money. cha ching.
 
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Trekkie963

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I think having SOME lab experience is valuable. I worked in a lab for two months one summer. That was enough for me. I know I don't want to do labwork as a career, but I do feel like a learned a lot about how research is conducted and was able to familiarize myself with a whole lot of experimental methods. Now when I pick up a research article, it is much easier for me to understand what exactly the researchers were doing and how they reached their conclusions. That's the main value I derived from research experience.
 

relentless11

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Research and lab experience isn't something unique to PhD programs. Lab experience gives you what it says...EXPERIENCE. You can't understand a process as effectively without doing it yourself. I can read about microbiology all day, but if i never plated and stained my own organisms, how the heck will I remember that down the road. Clearly something useful to know as a physician.

Even the limited general bio labs help out somehow. Go over the very basic sciences, including the scientific method. It baffles me that many undergraduate seniors don't remember something so important.

With regards to research itself. The whole process is pivotal in becoming a good doctor. Even though one may not do research down the road, the skills are extremely important. For instance, finding, and reading journals. Additionally knowing which studies are relevant. I don't know if you guys have noticed but there is a thing called Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM). This is pretty much what medicine is these days. Everyone likes EBM. What does EBM involve, well clearly evidence, and pretty much that usually lies with journal articles. Textbooks on EBM encourage MD's to keep up with the latest articles all the time. So it behooves one to have the reading, and analytical skills to rapidly go through these.

Last but not least, research, and labs provides a very useful thing, or at least incentive to be ORGANIZED. The pile system in ones room starts to fail after some time..haha
 

meanderson

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Except at top schools, I don't think research is all that important(ie essential). It's still a great thing to have though....just like lots of EC's would be. Working as an emt isn't essential to get into medical school either, but it's a good thing to have also.
 

uclacrewdude

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1. proves you have a love of science.

2. its a fantastic safeguard against the question all interviewers love: "why medicine and not ______?", or why you have a love of people as well, not just a love of science.

the point being that you can actually justify not going into phd work; it serves as proof that you like to interact with people, want to see more immediate results from your work, and are more interested in the application of research rather than generating research itself.
 

Sharkfan

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Originally posted by uclacrewdude
1. proves you have a love of science.

2. its a fantastic safeguard against the question all interviewers love: "why medicine and not ______?", or why you have a love of people as well, not just a love of science.

the point being that you can actually justify not going into phd work; it serves as proof that you like to interact with people, want to see more immediate results from your work, and are more interested in the application of research rather than generating research itself.
Yes. Exactly. I hated every minute of it, but I feel that I benefited (sp?) from the experience. :D
 

maoeris

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Also as a doctor you will have to read lots of scientific literature. Doing research allows you to read literature effectively. Most labs have journal clubs and you benefit immensly from them, because you learn how to gather the most data and how to interpret the data.
 

jlee9531

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cerb.

theres a lot that get in without research.

i have no scientific research at all.

and i think ive done fairly well relative to the people with my numerical credentials at least.

if you really dont want to do it, then dont do it man. just do more of the other things you rather be doing. and interviewers ask why i dont have any research, i tell them, well i felt i would be doing much more of a service to my community by doing these activities and talked about some of the significant things i have done during my time in college...and they listen, comment favorably and its all good.
 

Spitting Camel

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Originally posted by jlee9531
cerb.

theres a lot that get in without research.

i have no scientific research at all.

and i think ive done fairly well relative to the people with my numerical credentials at least.

if you really dont want to do it, then dont do it man. just do more of the other things you rather be doing. and interviewers ask why i dont have any research, i tell them, well i felt i would be doing much more of a service to my community by doing these activities and talked about some of the significant things i have done during my time in college...and they listen, comment favorably and its all good.
jlee... don't you think that your circumstances are special, though? You might be giving people the wrong impression.
 

jlee9531

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Originally posted by AlreadyInDebt
jlee... don't you think that your circumstances are special, though? You might be giving people the wrong impression.
true...but cerb is kinda in my position as well.

regardless tho...you cant be saying that everyone who has been accepted to med school has done research. among the 15,000 that get accepted everywhere...there must be thousands that get in without any research. i met a lot of these people on the interview path as well. applicants with no research. its not a rare thing. its actually pretty common. there are plenty of people on sdn i remember since this is a somewhat common topic, that have gotten in to med schools with no research at all.

i would hate to give cerb bad advice, but im fairly confident that if thousands of applicants get in without research, so can he.
 
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