Jun 9, 2013
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So real quick about me, I’m 25 and hold a degree in Hospitality Management. I got into the field and worked for a few years and found that I really hated it. I’ve always been a math & science person and initially planned on going the medical route before settling on the hospitality degree early in college (I live in Las Vegas and figured it was more practical). I had a 3.8 gpa the first time around. Now I’ve decided to go back and get a Bio degree to satisfy the pre-reqs for med schools. I’m very confident that I can keep my gpa high and do well on the MCAT. I’m also confident in my essay-writing abilities and my interview skills. So that really just leaves the ECs.

Obviously I’m older than the standard pre-med and this requires me to work to pay bills and tuition (although my parents do help some). So I figured I’d try to build up some ECs while getting paid. I just got CNA certified, so I could work full-time as a CNA and get some clinical experience first in a nursing home and then a hospital.

However, I’m now facing a dilemma and the reason for this post. I’m still in the management position that I’ve held for the past 3 years. I run my own department in a large Vegas casino. I recently put in my notice, as I was planning on picking up a CNA job next month. Although I hate my job and the hospitality industry, the executives that I work under really like me for some reason. They just offered me more money to stay. They will work around my school schedule and understand that I’m going to leave eventually. I hate this job, but more money would be helpful. I have some credit cards to pay off, etc.

I guess I’m just trying to figure out which option is more worthwhile. If I did take the job, I would probably stick around long enough to pay off credit cards and save up some money. Then I would look for a CNA position in the fall. I plan on taking the MCAT and getting my applications going in Spring/Summer 2015.

I feel like if I stick around here, it is a good indication of my leadership skills. Even though I hate the job, I feel I could use it to my advantage in interviews.

Thanks in advance for any advice…
 

DokterMom

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Ah, the hospitality industry... Where brain cells go to die :laugh:

What about a hospital or nursing home administrative position while you're in school? Your degree and job experience qualify you to some extent. If that's not a viable option, I'd stay where the money is to pay down your debts and build up a tuition fund -- at least until you've got some strong grades in upper division science classes and a good MCAT score. No use hopping off the money train if your academic credentials don't measure up, and it sounds like your employer is willing to be flexible. Don't underestimate how much that will matter. Volunteer with a homeless shelter, nursing home or community clinic to show altruism
 

Catalystik

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I just got CNA certified, so I could work full-time as a CNA and get some clinical experience first in a nursing home and then a hospital.

However, I’m now facing a dilemma and the reason for this post. I’m still in the management position that I’ve held for the past 3 years. I run my own department in a large Vegas casino. I recently put in my notice, as I was planning on picking up a CNA job next month. Although I hate my job and the hospitality industry, the executives that I work under really like me for some reason. They just offered me more money to stay. They will work around my school schedule and understand that I’m going to leave eventually. I hate this job, but more money would be helpful. I have some credit cards to pay off, etc.

I guess I’m just trying to figure out which option is more worthwhile. If I did take the job, I would probably stick around long enough to pay off credit cards and save up some money. Then I would look for a CNA position in the fall. I plan on taking the MCAT and getting my applications going in Spring/Summer 2015.

I feel like if I stick around here, it is a good indication of my leadership skills. Even though I hate the job, I feel I could use it to my advantage in interviews.
Comments:

Stop saying, "I hate my job, " and transition to something more like, "A career in medicine would fulfill my . . . ." You don't want to sound like you're fleeing something (or whining), rather that you're running toward something better.

If you stick with the current job, applying with only 9 months of patient experience, despite the great number of hours you'd accumulate, might not go over well with some adcomms, who appreciate duration more than total hours of involvement. You'd be better off volunteering immediately for three hours a week where you can interact with patients, so you'd approach the average listed of 1.5 years of patient involvement, whether you eventually take the CNA job or not.

Hospitality management can also be a positive for your application, due to the necessary leadership, as you mentioned, but also because of the requisite teamwork, problem solving, and possibly client interaction (which has much in common with practice in many fields of medicine). Just be sure to describe the job as such.

Nonmedical community service is increasingly important to a lot of med schools. Get involved in hands-on help to the poor of your community in some way, even if only for an hour a week. This is especially important if you get your clinical experience through the work place.

Taking the science prerequisites require labs, which are time consuming. Working full-time and pulling off great grades may not be possible. Be sure your bosses are aware that you might be obliged to drop to part-time, and that such a scenario is OK with them before you decide which job to go with.
 
Last edited:

theseeker4

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My advice would be to not work, and save that time for studying for the boards (i.e. USMLE Step 1 and Step 2) that can affect your choice of residence and whether you are accepted to certain specialities/areas. I know of only one person who has ever successfully worked during medical school, and he worked in the ER with his EMT training (? it was some sort of medical training/certification) or something comparable, so the experience was directly relevant and actually helped him do well on the boards and match into a great program.
You might want to re-read the OP....he/she is talking about working during pre-med courses, NOT med school.
 
Apr 12, 2012
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You might want to re-read the OP....he/she is talking about working during pre-med courses, NOT med school.
I was in a rush and read his age and the first two to three sentences without reading it through. Mea culpa. You would have thought I would have at least read the title carefully! :eek:
I deleted my stupid comment.
 
Apr 12, 2012
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Even if you receive less money, I would kill two birds with one stone and look for a position that affords you clinical experiences (be it a CNA or paid scribe position) sooner rather than later. This is especially true if you already have limited ECs that are medically related.