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Aug 10, 2018
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Hey everyone. I'd appreciate hearing some advice because I am feeling stuck. To provide some background, I graduated from undergrad in 2016 w/ a degree in sociology. During my last year of college, I took some classes that were medically-focused and became interested in pursuing medicine. So, after graduating, I worked in a lab for a couple years and then matriculated to a pretty well-known formal post-bacc program. The post-bacc program did not go well - I did not manage my stress levels well and did not enjoy the culture of the program. Academically, I did fine though. I ended up leaving after a year I have since been working on myself and educating myself on how I can better manage stress. While I was enthusiastic about pursuing medicine prior to starting the post-bacc, I have since lost that same enthusiasm. I feel like a quitter and do not know what other career I want to pursue. I know I'd be a great doctor, but given how the post-bacc went, I have doubts about whether this is the right path for me. Has anyone been in a similar situation? Would it be prudent to try out another post-bacc program, or just throw in the towel on medicine and find something else to pursue.
 
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Rachapkis

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Medical school can be difficult and stressful. The preclinical classes in medical school move at substantially faster pace and are more in depth than undergrad premed classes. In addition, you have to take board exams that can have a meaningful impact on your ability to get into competitive residencies. Thus, if your stress is not under control, medical school could certainly exacerbate the problem and leave you feeling miserable. Plus, medical school is preparing you to become a doctor, which has the potential to be stressful in of itself (some specialities more than others). However, if your stress is under control, the things you get to learn and do in medical school (assuming you enjoy medicine) are outstanding. Plus, many schools have a pass/fail curriculum, which can help to alleviate stress. Of course, only you know whether your stress issues will make the journey worthwhile or not. I hope that you can get them under control and become a first-rate doctor. Good luck.
 
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stickgirl390

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As a current MS3, I can’t recommend medical school to someone unless they are fully committed prior to applying. There are numerous ways to serve as a healthcare provider that are less expensive, time consuming, and stressful. I would recommend a masters program, maybe OT or PA.
 
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Aug 10, 2018
3
1
Medical school can be difficult and stressful. The preclinical classes in medical school move at substantially faster pace and are more in depth than undergrad premed classes. In addition, you have to take board exams that can have a meaningful impact on your ability to get into competitive residencies. Thus, if your stress is not under control, medical school could certainly exacerbate the problem and leave you feeling miserable. Plus, medical school is preparing you to become a doctor, which has the potential to be stressful in of itself (some specialities more than others). However, if your stress is under control, the things you get to learn and do in medical school (assuming you enjoy medicine) are outstanding. Plus, many schools have a pass/fail curriculum, which can help to alleviate stress. Of course, only you know whether your stress issues will make the journey worthwhile or not. I hope that you can get them under control and become a first-rate doctor. Good luck.

Thank you very much for your response! I appreciate it!
 
Aug 10, 2018
3
1
As a current MS3, I can’t recommend medical school to someone unless they are fully committed prior to applying. There are numerous ways to serve as a healthcare provider that are less expensive, time consuming, and stressful. I would recommend a masters program, maybe OT or PA.

Thanks for the response!
 
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Goro

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Hey everyone. I'd appreciate hearing some advice because I am feeling stuck. To provide some background, I graduated from undergrad in 2016 w/ a degree in sociology. During my last year of college, I took some classes that were medically-focused and became interested in pursuing medicine. So, after graduating, I worked in a lab for a couple years and then matriculated to a pretty well-known formal post-bacc program. The post-bacc program did not go well - I did not manage my stress levels well and did not enjoy the culture of the program. Academically, I did fine though. I ended up leaving after a year I have since been working on myself and educating myself on how I can better manage stress. While I was enthusiastic about pursuing medicine prior to starting the post-bacc, I have since lost that same enthusiasm. I feel like a quitter and do not know what other career I want to pursue. I know I'd be a great doctor, but given how the post-bacc went, I have doubts about whether this is the right path for me. Has anyone been in a similar situation? Would it be prudent to try out another post-bacc program, or just throw in the towel on medicine and find something else to pursue.
You tried it, you didn't like it.

Hence, time for Plan B.
 
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