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Years Required for Different Residencies???

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by Sirworksalot, Apr 7, 2004.

  1. Sirworksalot

    Sirworksalot Junior Member
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    I am sure it has been asked before, but can someone please post a link or something that details how many years are required for all the different types of residencies. Also, When someone goes into categorical internal medicine, does this mean that they are going to be internal medicine physicians or can they go into other areas and what? Will it then take them longer, or is there certain specialty residencies that require categorical first?

    Thanks!
     
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  3. Kalel

    Kalel Membership Revoked
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  4. Sirworksalot

    Sirworksalot Junior Member
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  5. chirurgeon

    Physician Faculty 10+ Year Member

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    Here's a useful pdf with the training lengths, number of residents training (albeit a couple of years old), and # of years supported by Medicaid funding. Good luck!
     

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  6. periodic

    periodic Senior Member
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    It's Medicare that funds graduate medical education (residency), not Medicaid.

    Minor point in some regards but might be useful to know.
     
  7. Alexander99

    Alexander99 Ghetto Fabulous
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    I noticed a lot of the specialities require 50+ hour workweeks. Why is it that physicians can't just work 40 hour (9-5) schedules?

    Are these long hours by choice or do they somehow make you work that much? Personally, if I'm making good money, I'd prefer to make a little less and have more free time than to kill myself for a little more. Afterall, if you're making $200-$300k, what's an extra $50k?
     
  8. punjabiMD

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    b/c taking care of patients simply takes a lot of time and there is a high demand for physicians.
     
  9. carrigallen

    carrigallen 16th centry dutch painter
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    ummmm..

    you may need to learn more about your future career...it sounds like you may have some misconceptions about how your workload is structured, and how your income is derived.

    Needless to say, it is a bit more complex than you seem to suggest above.
     
  10. uclacrewdude

    uclacrewdude the uclacrewdude abides
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    carigallen is right. sure, you could wrap up your work and zip out of the office by 5 every day ... but pt care is a little more complicated than that. caring for people just takes time, so frequently a lot of docs try and squeeze in one more pt or work on one just a little bit longer, more b/c they want to more than b/c theyre getting paid for it.

    i guess, from a machiavellian point of view, youd be establishing trust in pts and therefore making yourself more marketable.

    from a more humanistic point of view, its just worth it to spend the extra hour taking care of pts (esp if the HMO is telling you not to spend more than 10 min/pt).
     
  11. IlianaSedai

    IlianaSedai Senior Member
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    I don't know about you, but I wasn't born between 9am and 5pm. Am guessing mom wasn't in labor from 9-5 for all of us, either. :p
     
  12. Platysma

    Platysma Junior Member
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    Suppose you are an office-based physician. Then you have to round on your patients in the hospital everyday. This can take a few hours. Generally you do that either before or after work. Then, you have to see your clinic patients. That usually is a 9-5 thing, although physicians are always running late (things take longer than planned). Then afterwards, you have to do paperwork- dictate notes, go over lab value reports and follow up if necessary, read correspondence from people that you referred, take care of other stuff. After that, then you go home. But, you may be on call, which means you may get phone calls about all sorts of stuff all night. I guess if you scheduled 10 patients a day, then you'd have enough time to do all this within the 9-5 schedule, but you simply wouldn't make enough money to cover your overhead- paying nurses, medical assistants, receptionists, rent, utilities, malpractice insurance, equipment.

    Suppose you work as a surgeon. Then you have to show up early in the morning (Cases often start at 7:30). You may come in even earlier to round on patients, unless you have residents doing it for you. In any case, you probably need to round on them after your cases are done. That takes a lot of time. In addition, cases also often take longer than you think, and then there's add-on cases to deal with all the time. You also need to dictate your op notes, send letters to the people who referred your patients, etc. Could you do one case a day? You could, but then you wouldn't be making 200,000 a year...

    If you don't want to work hard, try Derm-- you still have to show up, but few hospital patients, and probably slightly less paperwork. Anesthesiology- you wake up early, but no rounding to deal with. Radiology- the high demand make the hours higher than many think, but at least in theory you could work less in the right situation. Optho- few hospitalized patients, less rounding. Remember the ROAD to happiness and all will be well.
     
  13. UCLAMAN

    UCLAMAN Air Jordan Collector
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    but rounding on patients is starting to change isn't it? the hospitalist movement is gaining steam. most academic teaching hospitals now use a hospitalist system and i think by 2010 there will be just as many hospitalists as there are cardiologists. so i think there will be a shift to being able to spend more time in the office for general practitioners. no more rounding.
     
  14. ericdamiansean

    ericdamiansean High Profiler
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    anyone here know anything about geriatrics?

    and how much do they earn?
     
  15. Kalel

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    avg salary of geriatricians is ~140-160K, around the same as a general internist.
     
  16. ericdamiansean

    ericdamiansean High Profiler
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    wow..tat's pretty little right?
    I think anaes do less work,study for the same amount of time, and they earn more. btw, how much do geriatricians/internist get taxed? And which of the subspecialities of internal med earns the most? I hear that there are now too many cardiologist, not many geriatricians because it's boring dealing with the elderly.

    I'm not sure myself...I like to help the elderly, but I'm also taking into consideration of the amount of money I can earn to repay back the loans etc.

    Am planning to do geriatrics in the US, and then return to my country to practice. But if i were to do anaes, I don't think the market there would be big, and the pay as well. I think the geriatricians back in my country earn quite a bit, there are only about 5 of them spread out throughout the country. How many are there in the US?

    oh yeah, and how much to fresh grads from med school earn when they are matched and start working at the hospital?
     

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